dreaminess vs languor what difference

what is difference between dreaminess and languor

English

Etymology

From dreamy +‎ -ness.

Noun

dreaminess (usually uncountable, plural dreaminesses)

  1. The characteristic of being dreamy.

Related terms

  • dreamy
  • dreamily


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈlæŋɡə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈlæŋ(ɡ)ɚ/
  • Rhymes: -æŋɡə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: lan‧guor

Etymology 1

The noun is derived from Middle English langore, langour (disease, illness; misery, sadness; suffering; condition or event causing sadness, suffering, etc.; unwholesomeness; idleness, inertia; depression, self-disgust; expression of grief) [and other forms], from Middle French languer, langueur, langour, and Anglo-Norman langor, langour, langur, Old French langueur, languour (disease, illness; suffering; emotional fatigue, sadness; listlessness; stagnation) (modern French langueur (langour)), and from their etymon Latin languor (faintness, feebleness; languor; apathy), from languēre, the present active infinitive of langueō (to feel faint or weak; (figurative) to be idle, inactive; to be listless), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *(s)leg-, *(s)leh₁g-. The English word is cognate with Catalan llangor, Italian languore (faintness, weakness; languor), langore (obsolete), Old Occitan langor (modern Occitan langor), Portuguese langor, languor (obsolete), Spanish langor.

Noun

languor (countable and uncountable, plural languors)

  1. (uncountable) A state of the body or mind caused by exhaustion or disease and characterized by a languid or weary feeling; lassitude; (countable) an instance of this.
    Synonym: torpor
  2. (uncountable) Melancholy caused by lovesickness, sadness, etc.; (countable) an instance of this.
  3. (uncountable) Dullness, sluggishness; lack of vigour; stagnation.
  4. (uncountable) Listless indolence or inactivity, especially if enjoyable or relaxing; dreaminess; (countable) an instance of this.
  5. (uncountable) Heavy humidity and stillness of the air.
  6. (uncountable, obsolete) Sorrow; suffering; also, enfeebling disease or illness; (countable, obsolete) an instance of this.
Alternative forms
  • languour
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 2

The verb is derived from Middle English langouren (to be ill; to languish, suffer; to cause to suffer) [and other forms], from Anglo-Norman langurer and Middle French langorer, langorir, langourer (to languish; to be languorous), from Old French languerer, from langueur (disease, illness; suffering; emotional fatigue, sadness; listlessness; stagnation); see further at etymology 1 above. Later uses of the verb have been influenced by the noun.

Verb

languor (third-person singular simple present languors, present participle languoring, simple past and past participle languored)

  1. (intransitive) To languish.
Derived terms
  • languoring (adjective)
  • languoring (noun) (obsolete)
  • languorment (obsolete)
Translations

References

Further reading

  • languor in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • languor in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • languor at OneLook Dictionary Search

Latin

Etymology

From langueō.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈlan.ɡʷor/, [ˈɫ̪äŋɡʷɔɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈlan.ɡwor/, [ˈlɑŋɡwɔr]

Noun

languor m (genitive languōris); third declension

  1. faintness, feebleness, languor, apathy

Declension

Third-declension noun.

Descendants

References

  • languor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • languor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • languor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin languor.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lanˈɡwoɾ/, [lãŋˈɡwoɾ]

Noun

languor m (plural languores)

  1. (rare) languor

Related terms

  • lánguido

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