drizzle vs moisten what difference

what is difference between drizzle and moisten

English

Etymology

Perhaps a back-formation from dryseling, a dissimilated variant of Middle English drysning (a falling of dew), from Old English drysnan (to extinguish), related to Old English drēosan (to fall, to decline), making it cognate to modern English droze and drowse. Compare also dialectal Swedish drösla.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɹɪz.l/
  • Rhymes: -ɪzəl
  • Hyphenation: driz‧zle

Verb

drizzle (third-person singular simple present drizzles, present participle drizzling, simple past and past participle drizzled)

  1. (impersonal) To rain lightly.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To shed slowly in minute drops or particles.
    • 1579, Edmund Spenser, The Shepheardes Calender, London, Januarye, Aegloga prima,[1]
      And from mine eyes the drizling teares descend,
      As on your boughes the ysicles depend.
    • c. 1594, William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet, Act III, Scene 5,[2]
      When the sun sets, the air doth drizzle dew;
      But for the sunset of my brother’s son
      It rains downright.
  3. (cooking, transitive) To pour slowly and evenly, especially oil or honey in cooking.
  4. (cooking, transitive) To cover by pouring in this manner.
  5. (slang) To urinate. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  6. (dated) To carry out parfilage, the process of unravelling.

Translations

Noun

drizzle (countable and uncountable, plural drizzles)

  1. Light rain.
  2. (physics, weather) Very small, numerous, and uniformly dispersed water drops, mist, or sprinkle. Unlike fog droplets, drizzle falls to the ground.
  3. (slang) Water.
  4. (baking) A cake onto which icing, honey or syrup has been drizzled in an artistic manner.
    • April 19, 2013,Felicity Cloake, “How to Cook the Perfect Lemon Drizzle Cake” in The Guardian
      Drizzle is not normally good news. Not when it’s falling from the sky, not when it’s replacing a decent helping of sauce, and especially not when it’s found on a menu in close proximity to the words “balsamic vinegar”. Deliciously sticky, sweet and sour lemon drizzle cake is the one, and very honourable, exception.

Derived terms

  • drizzly
  • drizzler

Translations

Anagrams

  • rizzled


English

Etymology

From moist +‎ -en.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɔɪsən/
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪsən

Verb

moisten (third-person singular simple present moistens, present participle moistening, simple past and past participle moistened)

  1. (transitive) To make moist or moister.
  2. (intransitive) To become moist or moister.

Translations

Anagrams

  • mestino, misnote

Finnish

Alternative forms

  • moisien

Adjective

moisten

  1. Genitive plural form of moinen.

Anagrams

  • monesti, moniste

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • moiste, moystyn, moysten, moyst, mooysten

Etymology

From moiste +‎ -en (infinitival suffix).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɔi̯stən/

Verb

moisten

  1. to moisten (make moister)
  2. to supply or provide with moisture.
  3. (rare) to invigorate; to enliven.
  4. (rare) to become moist or moister.

Conjugation

Descendants

  • English: moist (obsolete as a verb)

References

  • “moisten, v.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

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