droop vs loll what difference

what is difference between droop and loll

English

Etymology

From Middle English droupen, from Old Norse drúpa (to droop), from Proto-Germanic *drūpaną, *drupōną (to hang down, drip, drop), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰrewb- (to drip, drop).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: drūp, IPA(key): /ˈdɹuːp/
  • Rhymes: -uːp
  • Homophone: drupe

Verb

droop (third-person singular simple present droops, present participle drooping, simple past and past participle drooped)

  1. (intransitive) To hang downward; to sag.
    • 1866, John Keegan Casey, “Maire My Girl” in A Wreath of Shamrocks, Dublin: Robert S. McGee, p. 20,[1]
      On the brown harvest tree
      Droops the red cherry.
    • a. 1992, quote attributed to Sylvester Stallone
      I’m not handsome in the classical sense. The eyes droop, the mouth is crooked, the teeth aren’t straight, the voice sounds like a Mafioso pallbearer, but somehow it all works.
  2. (intransitive) To slowly become limp; to bend gradually.
    • c. 1605, William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act III, Scene 2,[2]
      Good things of day begin to droop and drowse;
      While night’s black agents to their preys do rouse.
    • 1676, Thomas Hobbes (translator), Homer’s Iliads in English, London: William Crook, Book 18, p. 289,[3]
      The Grapes that on it hung were black, and all
      The Vines supported and from drooping staid
      With silver Props, that down they could not fall []
    • Long after his cigar burnt bitter, he sat with eyes fixed on the blaze. When the flames at last began to flicker and subside, his lids fluttered, then drooped; but he had lost all reckoning of time when he opened them again to find Miss Erroll in furs and ball-gown kneeling on the hearth [].
  3. (intransitive) To lose all energy, enthusiasm or happiness; to flag.
    • c. 1596, William Shakespeare, King John, Act V, Scene 1,[4]
      But wherefore do you droop? why look you sad?
    • 1685, John Dryden, Threnodia Augustalis, London: Jacob Tonson, XII, p. 17,[5]
      Amidst the peaceful Triumphs of his Reign,
      What wonder if the kindly beams he shed
      Reviv’d the drooping Arts again []
    • 1711, Jonathan Swift, “The Accomplishment of the First of Mr. Bickerstaff’s Predictions” in Miscellanies, London: John Morphew, p. 284,[6]
      I saw him accidentally once or twice about 10 Days before he died, and observed he began very much to Droop and Languish []
    • 1713, Joseph Addison, Cato, a Tragedy, London: J. Tonson, Act I, Scene 2, p. 5,[7]
      I’ll animate the Soldier’s drooping Courage,
      With Love of Freedom, and Contempt of Life.
  4. (transitive) To allow to droop or sink.
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 1, Act II, Scene 5,[8]
      [] pithless arms, like to a wither’d vine
      That droops his sapless branches to the ground;
    • 1892, Arthur Christopher Benson, “Knapweed” in Le Cahier Jaune: Poems, Eton: privately printed, p. 62,[9]
      Down in the mire he droops his head;
      Forgotten, not forgiven.
  5. To proceed downward, or toward a close; to decline.
    • 1674, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 11, lines 175-178,[10]
      [] let us forth,
      I never from thy side henceforth to stray,
      Wherere our days work lies, though now enjoind
      Laborious, till day droop []
    • 1847, Alfred Tennyson, “The Princess” in The Princess; a Medley, London: Edward Moxon, p. 46,[11]
      [] and now when day
      Droop’d, and the chapel tinkled, mixt with those
      Six hundred maidens clad in purest white []

Derived terms

  • droopage

Translations

Noun

droop (plural droops)

  1. Something which is limp or sagging.
  2. A condition or posture of drooping.
  3. (aviation) A hinged portion of the leading edge of an aeroplane’s wing, which swivels downward to increase lift during takeoff and landing.

Coordinate terms

(part of aeroplane wing):

  • slat

Translations

Derived terms

  • brewer’s droop
  • droop nose
  • droop snoot

Related terms

  • drooped
  • drooping
  • droopy

References

  • droop at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Podor

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -oːp

Verb

droop

  1. singular past indicative of druipen


English

Etymology

From Middle English lollen, lullen (to lounge idly, hang loosely), of uncertain origin; the Middle English Dictionary suggests a derivation from Middle Dutch lollen, lullen (to doze; to mumble, talk nonsense), though the words could merely be cognate. Compare modern Dutch lol (fun)), Icelandic lolla (to act lazily). See also lull.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /lɒl/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /lɑl/
  • Rhymes: -ɒl

Verb

loll (third-person singular simple present lolls, present participle lolling, simple past and past participle lolled)

  1. (intransitive) To act lazily or indolently while reclining; to lean; to lie at ease. [from mid-14th c.]
    • 1726, Aulus Persius Flaccus; John Dryden, transl., “The Second Satyr”, in The Satyrs of Aulus Persius Flaccus. Made English by Mr. Dryden, published in The Satyrs of Decimus Junius Juvenalis: And of Aulus Persius Flaccus. Translated into English Verse by Mr. Dryden, and Several Other Eminent Hands. To which is Prefix’d a Discourse concerning the Original and Progress of Satyr, 5th edition, London: Printed for J[acob] Tonson, at Shakespear’s Head over-against Catherine-street in the Strand, →OCLC, page 251:
      And think’ſt thou, Jove himſelf, with Patience then / Can hear a Pray’r condemn’d by wicked Men? / That, void of Care, he lolls ſupine in State, / And leaves his Bus’neſs to be done by Fate?
  2. (intransitive) To hang extended from the mouth, like the tongue of an animal heated from exertion. [from 1610s]
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To let (the tongue) hang from the mouth in this way.

Synonyms

  • (to act lazily or indolently): relax, slack, slacken

Translations

References


Estonian

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *lolli. Cognate to Votic lollo (fool, idiot) and dialectal Finnish lolli (fool; stupid, fat, lazy).

Adjective

loll (genitive lolli, partitive lolli)

  1. stupid

Noun

loll (genitive lolli, partitive lolli)

  1. a stupid person; a fool

Declension

Antonyms

  • tark

See also

  • nõme
  • rumal

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