droop vs sag what difference

what is difference between droop and sag

English

Etymology

From Middle English droupen, from Old Norse drúpa (to droop), from Proto-Germanic *drūpaną, *drupōną (to hang down, drip, drop), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰrewb- (to drip, drop).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: drūp, IPA(key): /ˈdɹuːp/
  • Rhymes: -uːp
  • Homophone: drupe

Verb

droop (third-person singular simple present droops, present participle drooping, simple past and past participle drooped)

  1. (intransitive) To hang downward; to sag.
    • 1866, John Keegan Casey, “Maire My Girl” in A Wreath of Shamrocks, Dublin: Robert S. McGee, p. 20,[1]
      On the brown harvest tree
      Droops the red cherry.
    • a. 1992, quote attributed to Sylvester Stallone
      I’m not handsome in the classical sense. The eyes droop, the mouth is crooked, the teeth aren’t straight, the voice sounds like a Mafioso pallbearer, but somehow it all works.
  2. (intransitive) To slowly become limp; to bend gradually.
    • c. 1605, William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act III, Scene 2,[2]
      Good things of day begin to droop and drowse;
      While night’s black agents to their preys do rouse.
    • 1676, Thomas Hobbes (translator), Homer’s Iliads in English, London: William Crook, Book 18, p. 289,[3]
      The Grapes that on it hung were black, and all
      The Vines supported and from drooping staid
      With silver Props, that down they could not fall []
    • Long after his cigar burnt bitter, he sat with eyes fixed on the blaze. When the flames at last began to flicker and subside, his lids fluttered, then drooped; but he had lost all reckoning of time when he opened them again to find Miss Erroll in furs and ball-gown kneeling on the hearth [].
  3. (intransitive) To lose all energy, enthusiasm or happiness; to flag.
    • c. 1596, William Shakespeare, King John, Act V, Scene 1,[4]
      But wherefore do you droop? why look you sad?
    • 1685, John Dryden, Threnodia Augustalis, London: Jacob Tonson, XII, p. 17,[5]
      Amidst the peaceful Triumphs of his Reign,
      What wonder if the kindly beams he shed
      Reviv’d the drooping Arts again []
    • 1711, Jonathan Swift, “The Accomplishment of the First of Mr. Bickerstaff’s Predictions” in Miscellanies, London: John Morphew, p. 284,[6]
      I saw him accidentally once or twice about 10 Days before he died, and observed he began very much to Droop and Languish []
    • 1713, Joseph Addison, Cato, a Tragedy, London: J. Tonson, Act I, Scene 2, p. 5,[7]
      I’ll animate the Soldier’s drooping Courage,
      With Love of Freedom, and Contempt of Life.
  4. (transitive) To allow to droop or sink.
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 1, Act II, Scene 5,[8]
      [] pithless arms, like to a wither’d vine
      That droops his sapless branches to the ground;
    • 1892, Arthur Christopher Benson, “Knapweed” in Le Cahier Jaune: Poems, Eton: privately printed, p. 62,[9]
      Down in the mire he droops his head;
      Forgotten, not forgiven.
  5. To proceed downward, or toward a close; to decline.
    • 1674, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 11, lines 175-178,[10]
      [] let us forth,
      I never from thy side henceforth to stray,
      Wherere our days work lies, though now enjoind
      Laborious, till day droop []
    • 1847, Alfred Tennyson, “The Princess” in The Princess; a Medley, London: Edward Moxon, p. 46,[11]
      [] and now when day
      Droop’d, and the chapel tinkled, mixt with those
      Six hundred maidens clad in purest white []

Derived terms

  • droopage

Translations

Noun

droop (plural droops)

  1. Something which is limp or sagging.
  2. A condition or posture of drooping.
  3. (aviation) A hinged portion of the leading edge of an aeroplane’s wing, which swivels downward to increase lift during takeoff and landing.

Coordinate terms

(part of aeroplane wing):

  • slat

Translations

Derived terms

  • brewer’s droop
  • droop nose
  • droop snoot

Related terms

  • drooped
  • drooping
  • droopy

References

  • droop at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Podor

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -oːp

Verb

droop

  1. singular past indicative of druipen


English

Etymology 1

From late Middle English saggen, probably of Scandinavian/Old Norse origin (compare Norwegian Nynorsk sagga (move slowly)); probably akin to Danish and Norwegian sakke, Swedish sacka, Icelandic sakka, Old Norse sokkva. Compare also Dutch zakken and German sacken (from Low German).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: săg, IPA(key): /sæɡ/
  • Rhymes: -æɡ

Noun

sag (countable and uncountable, plural sags)

  1. The state of sinking or bending; a droop.
  2. The difference in elevation of a wire, cable, chain or rope suspended between two consecutive points.
  3. The difference in height or depth between the vertex and the rim of a curved surface, specifically used for optical elements such as a mirror or lens.
Translations

Verb

sag (third-person singular simple present sags, present participle sagging, simple past and past participle sagged)

  1. To sink, in the middle, by its weight or under applied pressure, below a horizontal line or plane.
  2. (by extension) To lean, give way, or settle from a vertical position.
  3. (figuratively) To lose firmness, elasticity, vigor, or a thriving state; to sink; to droop; to flag; to bend; to yield, as the mind or spirits, under the pressure of care, trouble, doubt, or the like; to be unsettled or unbalanced.
  4. To loiter in walking; to idle along; to drag or droop heavily.
  5. (transitive) To cause to bend or give way; to load.
  6. (informal) To wear one’s trousers so that their top is well below the waist.
  7. (informal, Canada) To pull down someone else’s pants.
Quotations
  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:sag.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Noun

sag (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of saag
    • 2003, Charles Campion, The Rough Guide to London Restaurants (page 173)
      The dal tarka (£5) is made from whole yellow split peas, while sag aloo (£5) brings potatoes in a rich and oily spinach puree.

Anagrams

  • AGS, AGs, Ags., GAs, GSA, Gas, SGA, gas

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch zacht.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /saχ/, [säχ], [sɐχ]

Adjective

sag (attributive sagte, comparative sagter, superlative sagste)

  1. soft

Danish

Etymology

From Old Danish sak, from Old Norse sǫk, from Proto-Germanic *sakō. Cognate with Swedish sak, Icelandic sök, English sake, Dutch zaak, German Sache.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /saːɡ/, [sæːˀj]
  • Rhymes: -aːɡ

Noun

sag c (singular definite sagen, plural indefinite sager)

  1. matter, affair
    Jeg er ikke bekendt med alle sagens detaljer.

    I am not acquainted with all the details of the matter.
  2. cause
    Jeg er villig til at dø for sagen.

    I am willing to die for the cause.
  3. thing
    Jeg går lige ind og pakker mine sager ud.

    I’ll go inside and pack out my things.
  4. case, lawsuit
    Den 27-årige nægtede sig skyldig i spritkørsel, så sagen måtte udsættes.

    The 27-year-old pleaded not guilty to drunk driving, so the case had to be adjourned.
  5. file
    Jeg tog mine papirer og sager med mig hjem.

    I took my papers and cases home with me.
  6. food (only in plural)
    Tjeneren var ved at stable en masse lækre sager op på bordet.

    The waiter was stacking a lot of delicious things on the table.

Inflection

Synonyms

  • (legal case): retssag

Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse sǫg, from Proto-Germanic *sagō, from Proto-Indo-European *sek- (to cut).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛaː/
  • Homophone: sæð

Noun

sag f (genitive singular sagar, plural sagir)

  1. saw; a tool with a toothed blade used for cutting hard substances, in particular wood or metal

Declension

Related terms

  • sagarblað
  • sagarmaður
  • sagartonn

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /zaːk/ (standard)
  • IPA(key): /zax/ (northern and central Germany; very common)
  • Rhymes: -aːk, -ax

Verb

sag

  1. singular imperative of sagen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of sagen

Icelandic

Etymology

From the verb saga (to saw).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /saːɣ/
  • Rhymes: -aːɣ

Noun

sag n (genitive singular sags, no plural)

  1. sawdust

Declension

Anagrams

  • gas

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse sǫg, from Proto-Germanic *sagō, from Proto-Indo-European *sek- (to cut).

Noun

sag f or m (definite singular saga or sagen, indefinite plural sager, definite plural sagene)

  1. (tools) a saw
  2. sawmill
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Verb

sag

  1. imperative of sage

References

  • “sag” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse sǫg

Noun

sag f (definite singular saga, indefinite plural sager, definite plural sagene)

  1. (tools) a saw

Derived terms

References

  • “sag” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Latin sagum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sâːɡ/

Noun

sȃg m (Cyrillic spelling са̑г)

  1. carpet, rug

Declension

Synonyms

  • tèpih

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