dross vs slag what difference

what is difference between dross and slag

English

Alternative forms

  • drosse (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English drosse, dros, from Old English drōs, an apocopated variant of Old English drōsna, drōsne (a ground, sediment, lees, dregs, dirt, ear wax), from *drēcg +‎ -sn, from Proto-Germanic *drōhsnǭ, from *dragjō +‎ *-snō, (“yeast, sediment”; compare *dragjō (yeast)), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰrā́ks (sediment, yeast). Cognate with Scots dros, drose, drosse (small particles, fragments, dross), Middle Dutch droes (dregs), Dutch droesem (dregs), German Drusen (lees, dregs), Latin fracēs (grounds or dregs of oil). Related also to drast, dregs.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /dɹɒs/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /dɹɔs/
  • (Canada, cotcaught merger) IPA(key): /dɹɑs/
  • Rhymes: -ɒs, -ɔːs
  • Rhymes: -ɔːs

Noun

dross (usually uncountable, plural drosses)

  1. Waste or impure matter.
  2. Residue that forms on the surface of molten metal from oxidation.
  3. The impurities in metal.
  4. A waste product from working with metal.
    • 2008, Narendra B. Dahotre, Sandip Harimkar, Laser Fabrication and Machining of Materials, Springer Science & Business Media (→ISBN), page 176
    • 2008, André Ditze, Christiane Scharf, Recycling of Magnesium, Ditze & Scharf (→ISBN), page 25
  5. (figuratively) Worthless or trivial matter.
    Synonyms: junk, rubbish

Quotations

  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:dross.

Derived terms

  • drosser
  • drossless
  • drossy

Translations

Verb

dross (third-person singular simple present drosses, present participle drossing, simple past and past participle drossed)

  1. (transitive) To remove dross from.

Anagrams

  • sords

Latvian

Adjective

dross (definite drosais, comparative drosāks, superlative visdrosākais, adverb drosi)

  1. (dialectal) brave, safe, sure; alternative form of drošs

Declension



English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle Low German slagge (whence also Dutch slak, German Schlacke, Swedish slagg); originally, the splinters struck off from the metal by hammering; compare slay.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /slæɡ/
  • Rhymes: -æɡ

Noun

slag (countable and uncountable, plural slags)

  1. Waste material from a mine.
    • 2011, Vivienne Dockerty, A Woman Undefeated, page 54,
      After the big village, the scenery had returned to grass and woodland, but this had now given way to ugly mounds of discarded slag. Beyond the slag was a colliery with its machinery and smoking chimney, making the whole area look grim and austere.
  2. Scum that forms on the surface of molten metal.
    • 2006, Melisa W. Lai, Michele Burns Ewald, Chapter 95: Silver, Martin J. Wonsiewicz, Karen G. Edmonson, Peter J. Boyle (editors), Goldfrank′s Toxicologic Emergencies, 8th Edition, page 1358,
      In Asia Minor and on islands in the Aegean Sea, dumps of slag (scum formed by molten metal surface oxidation) demonstrate that silver was being separated from lead as early as 5000 BC.
    • 2009, John Hoerr, Monongahela Dusk, page 255,
      He leans out over the track and skims slag off the top of the boiling steel, risking what is called “catching a flyer,” which occurs when hot metal explodes out of the mold, spraying everyone in the vicinity.
  3. Impurities formed and separated out when a metal is smelted from ore; vitrified cinders.
    • 2008, Barbara S. Ottaway, Ben Roberts, The Emergence of Metalworking, Andrew Jones (editor), Prehistoric Europe: Theory and Practice, page 207,
      Consequently, mounds of large ‘cakes’ of slag are often found near the smelting sites of the Late Bronze Age, as for example at Ramsau in Austria (Doonan et al. 1996).
    Synonyms: dross, recrement, scoria
  4. Hard aggregate remaining as a residue from blast furnaces, sometimes used as a surfacing material.
    • 2006, Jan R. Prusinski, 44: Slag as a Cementitious Material, Joseph F. Lamond, James H. Pielert (editors), Significance of Tests and Properties of Concrete and Concrete-Making Materials, page 517,
      During blast furnace operations, the plant operator pays careful attention to the slag chemistry (both composition and variability) as slag behavior is a major consideration in ensuring the quality of hot metal (molten iron).
    • 2010, Yuri N. Toulouevski, Ilyaz Y. Zinurov, Innovation in Electric Arc Furnaces, Springer, page 16,
      All these properties are determined by slag composition and its temperature. In basic slags, foaming ability increases as SiO2 concentration grows.
  5. Scoria associated with a volcano.
  6. (Britain, derogatory, dated) A coward.
  7. (Britain, chiefly Cockney, derogatory) A contemptible person, a scumbag.
    • 1996, Sarah Kane, Phaedra′s Love, Scene 8, 2001, Sarah Kane: Complete Plays, page 100,
      Kill him. Kill the royal slag.
    • 2012, Danny Dyer, tweet, quoted by Alexis Petridis, “Danny Dyer: why them 9/11 slags are freaking his nut”, The Guardian
      Can’t believe it’s been nearly 11 years since them slags smashed into the twin towers
  8. (Britain, derogatory) A prostitute.
    • 1984, Tristan Jones, Heart of Oak, 1997, paperback edition, page 260,
      We never talked about that, of course; we talked about how we could find a woman in the Dilly, and if the Yanks had taken them all, how we could always resort to the peroxided older slags who hung out around the side doors to Waterloo station and did knee tremblers for the Yanks.
  9. (Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, slang, derogatory) A woman (sometimes a man) who has loose morals relating to sex; a slut.
    • 2002, Josephine Cox, The Woman Who Left, 2012, ebook, unnumbered page,
      Slag! Wait till I tell Jacob what we′ve been doing – and I will, you mark my words! He′ll want nowt to do with you then, will he, eh? He′ll see you for what you really are. A cheap and nasty little bitch!’
    • 2008, Ashley Lister, Swingers – Female Confidential, page 31,
      [] He was a lovely man but, when I told him I wanted to continue swinging, he freaked out and called me a slag.’
    • 2010, The Coast, Halifax, Canada, [2],
      [] To the lady that came in to my coffee shop today and ripped on me and my fellow employees for being too slow: eat shit, you miserable slag!’

Synonyms

  • (woman with loose sexual morals): see Thesaurus:promiscuous woman

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • clinker

Verb

slag (third-person singular simple present slags, present participle slagging, simple past and past participle slagged)

  1. (transitive) To produce slag.
  2. (intransitive) To become slag; to agglomerate when heated below the fusion point.
  3. (transitive) To reduce to slag.
  4. (slang, transitive, sometimes with “off”) To talk badly about; to malign or denigrate (someone).
    • 2010, Courtenay Young, Help Yourself Towards Mental Health, page 344:
      If you slag off the other person, then—to the extent that your child identifies with that person as their parent—you are slagging off a part of them.
    • 2011, John Davies, Slings and Arrows (page 109)
      Rather than wait for her to start slagging my mother, I would disappear for a couple of days and inevitably, because I was getting no love at home, I began to stray once again.
  5. (intransitive, Australia, slang) To spit.

Derived terms

Translations

References

  • slag in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “slag”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • GALS, Glas, LGAs, gals, lags

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse slag, slagr from Proto-Germanic *slagą, *slagiz, cognate with German Schlag.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /slaːˀɣ/, [ˈsl̥æˀj], [ˈsl̥æˀ], (in the sense “game” and some fixed expressions) IPA(key): /slaɣ/, [ˈsl̥ɑw]

Noun

slag n (singular definite slaget, plural indefinite slag)

  1. A hit, punch
  2. A beat
  3. A battle (between two armies or, metaphorically two competing parties)
  4. A game.

Derived terms

References

  • “slag” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch slach, from Old Dutch slag, from Proto-West Germanic *slagi, from Proto-Germanic *slagiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /slɑx/
  • Hyphenation: slag
  • Rhymes: -ɑx

Noun

slag m (plural slagen, diminutive slagje n)

  1. A blow, knock, strike
  2. A stroke, limb movement; a style of movement, notably style of swimming
  3. A twist, turn
  4. A beat, pulsation
  5. A stroke, blow, hit, physical impact
  6. A count, occurrence; the striking of a clock
  7. A battle, violent confrontation
  8. (ball sports) A strike, hit
    Antonym: wijd
  9. A strike, fast move

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Negerhollands: slaa

Noun

slag n (plural slagen, diminutive slagje n)

  1. A kind, type, sort.
  2. A parcel, plot, premise (stretch of land).

Anagrams

  • glas

Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse slag, from Proto-Germanic *slagiz (hit, blow).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /slɛaː/

Noun

slag n (genitive singular slags, plural sløg)

  1. A hit; punch.
  2. (medicine) A cardiac stroke.
  3. A battle between two armies, navies or air forces
  4. A kind; sort.
  5. (biology, taxonomy) A species.

Declension

Derived terms

Related terms

References

  • Lívfrøðilig frøðinevni (Jens-Kjeld Jensen & Marjun A. Simonsen) (nomenclature)
  • Øktur føroyskur frøðinevnalisti (Jens-Kjeld Jensen) (Extended List of Nomenclature)

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse slag, from Proto-Germanic *slagiz (hit, blow).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stlaːɣ/
  • Rhymes: -aːɣ

Noun

slag n (genitive singular slags, nominative plural slög)

  1. A beat, stroke, blow (an act of hitting, beating, striking).
  2. (music) A beat.

Declension

Derived terms

  • slegill

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse slag, and slagr (sense 4).

Noun

slag n (definite singular slaget, indefinite plural slag, definite plural slaga or slagene)

  1. A hit; punch.
  2. (medicine) A cardiac stroke.
  3. A battle between two armies, navies or air forces.
  4. A kind; sort.

Derived terms

References

  • “slag” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /slɑːɡ/ (example of pronunciation)

Etymology 1

From Old Norse slag.

Noun

slag n (definite singular slaget, indefinite plural slag, definite plural slaga)

  1. a blow, a strike, a punch.
  2. a battle.
  3. (medicine) a stroke
  4. (nautical) a bilge
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Norse slagr.

Noun

slag n (definite singular slaget, indefinite plural slag, definite plural slaga)

  1. A type, a kind, a sort.
Derived terms

References

  • “slag” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • lags

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse slag, from Proto-Germanic *slagiz (hit, blow).

Pronunciation

Noun

slag n

  1. A hit; punch.
  2. A hit of a ball by a bat or a racket.
  3. A battle between two armies, navies or air forces
    Synonym: fältslag
  4. A stroke; the striking of a clock
  5. stroke; the time when a clock strikes
  6. (medicine) stroke; a loss of brain function arising when the blood supply to the brain is suddenly interrupted.
  7. A kind; sort.
    Synonym: sort
  8. A while; moment; a short period of time.
    Synonym: stund
  9. A fold on the legs of a pair of trousers, where about an inch of the leg is folded upwards.

Declension

See also

  • få slag

Anagrams

  • algs, glas, lags

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