drub vs lick what difference

what is difference between drub and lick

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɹʌb/
  • Rhymes: -ʌb

Etymology 1

From Middle English *drob, drof, from Old English *drōb, drōf (turbid; dreggy; dirty), from Proto-Germanic *drōbuz (turbid).

Noun

drub (usually uncountable, plural drubs)

  1. (dialectal, Northern England) carbonaceous shale; small coal; slate, dross, or rubbish in coal.

Derived terms

  • drubly

Etymology 2

1625, of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Arabic ضَرَبَ(ḍaraba, to beat, to hit), or perhaps originally from a dialectal word (Kent) drab, variant of drop, dryp, drib (to beat), from Middle English drepen (preterit drop, drap, drape “to strike, kill”) from Old English drepan (to strike), from Proto-Germanic *drepaną (to beat, bump, strike, slay), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰreb- (to strike, crush, kill). Akin to Old Frisian drop (a blow, beat), Old High German treffan (to hit), Old Norse drepa (to strike, slay, kill). Compare also dub. More at drape.

Verb

drub (third-person singular simple present drubs, present participle drubbing, simple past and past participle drubbed) (transitive)

  1. To beat (someone or something) with a stick.
  2. To defeat someone soundly; to annihilate or crush.
  3. To forcefully teach something.
  4. To criticize harshly; to excoriate.

Derived terms

  • drubbing

Translations

Anagrams

  • BrdU, Burd, brud, burd


English

Etymology

From Middle English likken, from Old English liccian, from Proto-West Germanic *likkōn, from Proto-Germanic *likkōną (compare Saterland Frisian likje, Dutch likken, German lecken), from Proto-Indo-European *leyǵʰ- (compare Old Irish ligid, Latin lingō (lick), ligguriō (to lap, lick up), Lithuanian laižyti, Old Church Slavonic лизати (lizati), Ancient Greek λείχω (leíkhō), Old Armenian լիզեմ (lizem), Persian لیسیدن(lisidan), Sanskrit लेढि (léḍhi), रेढि (réḍhi)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Noun

lick (plural licks)

  1. The act of licking; a stroke of the tongue.
  2. The amount of some substance obtainable with a single lick.
  3. A quick and careless application of anything, as if by a stroke of the tongue.
  4. A place where animals lick minerals from the ground.
  5. A small watercourse or ephemeral stream. It ranks between a rill and a stream.
  6. (colloquial) A stroke or blow.
  7. (colloquial) A small amount; a whit.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:modicum
    • 2011 Allen Gregory, “Pilot” (season 1, episode 1):
      Allen Gregory DeLongpre: Why don’t I call Jean-Michel at Il Portofino? We’ll get a table outside? Ooh, I’m not getting a lick of service. Babe, can I hop on your landline?
  8. (informal) An attempt at something.
  9. (music) A short motif.
  10. (informal) A rate of speed. (Always qualified by good, fair, or a similar adjective.)
  11. (slang) An act of cunnilingus.

Translations

Verb

lick (third-person singular simple present licks, present participle licking, simple past and past participle licked)

  1. (transitive) To stroke with the tongue.
  2. (transitive) To lap; to take in with the tongue.
  3. (colloquial) To beat with repeated blows.
  4. (colloquial) To defeat decisively, particularly in a fight.
  5. (colloquial) To overcome.
  6. (vulgar, slang) To perform cunnilingus.
  7. (colloquial) To do anything partially.
  8. (of flame, waves etc.) To lap.
    • 1895, H. G. Wells, The Time Machine Chapter XI
      Now, in this decadent age the art of fire-making had been altogether forgotten on the earth. The red tongues that went licking up my heap of wood were an altogether new and strange thing to Weena.

Translations

Derived terms


Yola

Etymology

From Middle English liken, from Old English līcian, from Proto-West Germanic *līkēn.

Verb

lick

  1. like

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith

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