dunghill vs midden what difference

what is difference between dunghill and midden

English

Alternative forms

  • dung-hill, (obsolete) dunghil

Etymology

dung +‎ hill

Noun

dunghill (plural dunghills)

  1. A heap of dung, especially one for agricultural purposes.
    Synonyms: muckheap, dungheap
  2. (figuratively, derogatory) Any wretchedly mean, dirty or loathsome place, situation or condition.

Translations



English

Etymology

From Middle English midding, myddyng, from Old Danish mykdyngja, (a compound of Old Norse myk, myki (muck, manure) and dyngja (dung, dungpile)), whence also Danish møgdynge and mødding, Norwegian mødding, dialectal Swedish mödding.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɪdən/
  • Rhymes: -ɪdən

Noun

midden (plural middens)

  1. A dungheap.
  2. A refuse heap usually near a dwelling.
  3. (archaeology) A prehistoric pile of bones and shells.
  4. (zoology) A shelter made of vegetation and other materials by packrats.
  5. (zoology) An accumulation of dried urine and fecal deposits made by hyraxes.

Translations

Derived terms

  • spiritual midden

Anagrams

  • minded

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch midden, from Old Dutch *middi, from Proto-West Germanic *midi, from Proto-Germanic *midjaz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *medʰyo-.

Pronunciation

Adverb

midden

  1. in the middle

Derived terms

  • in het midden van
  • middenst

Luxembourgish

Adjective

midden

  1. inflection of midd:
    1. strong/weak nominative/accusative masculine singular
    2. weak dative masculine/neuter singular
    3. strong/weak dative plural

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian midde, from Proto-West Germanic *midi.

Noun

midden c or n (no plural)

  1. middle (part between beginning and end)

Further reading

  • “midden (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

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