dupe vs gull what difference

what is difference between dupe and gull

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /djuːp/
  • (US) IPA(key): /duːp/
  • Hyphenation: dupe

Etymology 1

From French duper, from Middle French duppe.

Noun

dupe (plural dupes)

  1. A person who has been deceived.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:dupe
Related terms
  • dupery
Translations

Verb

dupe (third-person singular simple present dupes, present participle duping, simple past and past participle duped)

  1. To swindle, deceive, or trick.
Translations

Etymology 2

Abbreviation of duplicate.

Noun

dupe (plural dupes)

  1. (photography) A duplicate of a photographic image.
  2. (restaurant industry) A duplicate of an order receipt printed for kitchen staff.
  3. (informal) A duplicate.

Verb

dupe (third-person singular simple present dupes, present participle duping, simple past and past participle duped)

  1. (transitive) To duplicate.
Synonyms
  • double; see also Thesaurus:duplicate
Antonyms
  • dedupe, halve

Anagrams

  • E’d up, pued

Bube

Noun

dupe

  1. ghost

Descendants

  • English: duppy

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from French dupe, from Middle French [Term?].

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdypə/
  • Hyphenation: du‧pe

Noun

dupe m (plural dupes)

  1. victim

Synonyms

  • slachtoffer

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dyp/
  • (Quebec) IPA(key): /dzʏp/

Verb

dupe

  1. first-person singular present indicative of duper
  2. third-person singular present indicative of duper
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of duper
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of duper
  5. second-person singular imperative of duper

Noun

dupe f (plural dupes)

  1. A person who has been deceived, see dupe.

Further reading

  • “dupe” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *dupę

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dûpe/

Noun

dȕpe n (Cyrillic spelling ду̏пе)

  1. (vulgar) ass
    Synonym: gùzica

Declension



English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: gŭl, IPA(key): /ˈɡʌl/
  • Rhymes: -ʌl

Etymology 1

From Middle English gulle, from a Brythonic language, from Proto-Brythonic *gwuɨlann, from Proto-Celtic *wēlannā (seagull). Cognate with Welsh gwylan, Cornish goolan, Breton gouelan, Old Irish faílenn. Compare French goéland, a borrowing from Breton.

Noun

gull (plural gulls)

  1. A seabird of the genus Larus or of the family Laridae.
  2. Any of various pierid butterflies of the genus Cepora.
Synonyms
  • (seabird): mew, seamew, seagull
Derived terms
  • Audouin’s gull (Ichthyaetus ichthyaetus)
  • black-headed gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
  • Bonaparte’s gull (Chroicocephalus philadelphia)
  • Caspian gull (Larus cachinnans)
  • common gull (Larus canus)
  • Dominican gull (Larus dominicanus)
  • flood gull (Rynchops nigra)
  • Franklin’s gull (Leucophaeus pipixcan)
  • glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus)
  • great black-backed gull (Larus marinus)
  • gull-billed tern (Gelochelidon nilotica)
  • gull chaser (Stercorarius pomarius)
  • gullfeed (Scaevola plumieri)
  • herring gull (Larus spp.)
  • Iceland gull (Larus glaucoides)
  • ivory gull (Pagophila eburnea)
  • kelp gull (Larus dominicanus)
  • lesser black-backed gull (Larus fuscus)
  • land gull (Larus marinus)
  • laughing gull (Xema ridibundus, Leucophaeus atricilla)
  • little gull (Larus minutus)
  • Mediterranean gull (Ichthyaetus melanocephalus)
  • mew gull (Larus canus)
  • Pacific gull (Larus pacificus)
  • Pallas’s gull (Ichthyaetus ichthyaetus)
  • red-billed gull (Chroicocephalus scopulinus)
  • ring-billed gull (Larus delawarensis)
  • Ross’s gull (Rhodostethia rosea)
  • Sabine’s gull (Xema sabini)
  • seagull (Laridae spp.)
  • silver gull (Chroicocephalus novaehollandiae)
  • slaty-backed gull (Larus schistisagus)
  • slender-billed gull (Chroicocephalus genei)
  • white-eyed gull (Ichthyaetus leucophthalmus)
  • yellow-legged gull (Larus michahellis)
Translations

Etymology 2

Perhaps from an obsolete term gull (swallow).

Noun

gull (plural gulls)

  1. (slang) A cheating trick; a fraud.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act 2 Scene 3
      BENEDICK. [Aside] I should think this a gull, but that the white-bearded fellow speaks it: knavery cannot, sure, hide itself in such reverence.
  2. One easily cheated; a dupe.
  3. (obsolete, Oxford University slang) A swindler or trickster.
Synonyms
  • (dupe): See also Thesaurus:dupe
  • (swindler): See also Thesaurus:fraudster

Verb

gull (third-person singular simple present gulls, present participle gulling, simple past and past participle gulled)

  1. To deceive or cheat.
    • O, but to ha’ gulled him / Had been a mastery.
    • 1660, John Dryden, Astraea Redux
      The vulgar, gulled into rebellion, armed.
    • c. 1798, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Wallenstein
      I’m not gulling him for the emperor’s service.
    • 1819, John Keats, Otho the Great, Act IV, Scene I, verse 162-165
      [] speak your curses out
      Against me, who would sooner crush and grind
      A brace of toads, than league with them to oppress
      An innocent lady, gull an Emperor []
  2. (US, slang) To mislead.
  3. (US, slang) To trick and defraud.
Synonyms
  • (to deceive): See also Thesaurus:deceive
Derived terms
  • gullcatcher
  • gullible
  • gullibility
Translations

References

Further reading

  • gull on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Larus on Wikispecies.Wikispecies

Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse gull, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kʊtl/

Noun

gull n (genitive singular guls, uncountable)

  1. gold
  2. (in proverbs) richness, money, livestock
  3. gold medal, first place (sports, etc.)

Declension


Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse gull (gold), from Proto-Germanic *gulþą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kʏtl/
  • Rhymes: -ʏtl

Noun

gull n (genitive singular gulls, nominative plural gull)

  1. (uncountable) gold (chemical element)
  2. (countable) a cherished thing
  3. (countable) a gold medal or prize

Declension

Derived terms

  • ekki er allt gull sem glóir
  • glópagull
  • gull af manni
  • morgunstund gefur gull í mund

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse gull, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʉlː/

Noun

gull n (definite singular gullet, uncountable)

  1. gold

Derived terms

Related terms

  • forgylle, forgylt

References

  • “gull” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse gull and goll, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą. Akin to English gold.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʉlː/

Noun

gull n (definite singular gullet, uncountable)

  1. gold

Derived terms

References

  • “gull” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Norse

Alternative forms

  • goll

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *gulþą (gold). Cognate with Old English gold, Old Frisian gold, Old Saxon gold, Old Dutch golt, Old High German gold, Gothic ???????????????? (gulþ). See also Finnish kulta. Ultimately from Pre-Germanic *ǵʰl̥tóm (gold), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰelh₃- (yellow; gleam; to shine).

Pronunciation

  • (12th century Icelandic) IPA(key): /ˈɡulː/

Noun

gull n (genitive gulls, plural gull)

  1. (uncountable, singular only) gold
    • Laurentius saga 65, in 1858, Jón_Sigurðsson, Guðbrandur_Vigfússon, Biskupa sögur, Volume I. Copenhagen, page 877:
      Vér viljum ok gefa þér gull vort, []
      We also want to give you our gold, []
  2. (countable) a jewel, thing of value, especially a finger-ring
    • Stjórn 78, in 1862, C. R. Unger, Stjórn: gammelnorsk Bibelhistorie: fra Verdens Skabelse til det babyloniske Fangenskab. Christiania, page 254:
      Enn þegar sem hon bar þetta gull, []
      But when she wore that ring, []

Declension

Derived terms

Descendants

References

  • gull in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • gull in An Icelandic-English Dictionary, R. Cleasby and G. Vigfússon, Clarendon Press, 1874, at Internet Archive.
  • gull in A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, G. T. Zoëga, Clarendon Press, 1910, at Internet Archive.

Swedish

Alternative forms

  • guld (modern form)

Etymology

From Old Norse gull, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą.

Noun

gull n

  1. (poetic, archaic) gold
    Har du silver har du gull, / har du kistorna full?

    Do you have silver and gold, / are your treasure chests full? (song lyrics)
    Wilt thw wara tik sielffuir hull, / tw älska friiheet meer än gull (Old Swedish, poem by bishop Tomas, 1439)

    Vill du vara dig själver huld, / du älska frihet mer än guld (translated to standard Swedish)

    If you want to help yourself, you should love freedom more than gold
  2. (colloquial) baby, darling, someone dear and cute (gullig), someone to cuddle (gulla med)
    mina små gull

    my little darlings
    Kom nu gullet, det är finfint väder ute

    Come on baby, it’s a perfect sunny day

Usage notes

  • The form gull is archaic or poetic outside compound words and fixed expressions, where it has taken the sense of beloved or favorable as in gullgosse (golden boy), gullegris (darling, pet), gullunge (beloved child), etc.

Declension


Westrobothnian

Etymology

From Old Norse gull, goll, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą.

Noun

gull n (definite gullä)

  1. (uncountable) gold

Derived terms

  • gullfinger
  • gullskre
  • gulltypp
  • gyllerfeinger

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