dupe vs victim what difference

what is difference between dupe and victim

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /djuːp/
  • (US) IPA(key): /duːp/
  • Hyphenation: dupe

Etymology 1

From French duper, from Middle French duppe.

Noun

dupe (plural dupes)

  1. A person who has been deceived.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:dupe
Related terms
  • dupery
Translations

Verb

dupe (third-person singular simple present dupes, present participle duping, simple past and past participle duped)

  1. To swindle, deceive, or trick.
Translations

Etymology 2

Abbreviation of duplicate.

Noun

dupe (plural dupes)

  1. (photography) A duplicate of a photographic image.
  2. (restaurant industry) A duplicate of an order receipt printed for kitchen staff.
  3. (informal) A duplicate.

Verb

dupe (third-person singular simple present dupes, present participle duping, simple past and past participle duped)

  1. (transitive) To duplicate.
Synonyms
  • double; see also Thesaurus:duplicate
Antonyms
  • dedupe, halve

Anagrams

  • E’d up, pued

Bube

Noun

dupe

  1. ghost

Descendants

  • English: duppy

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from French dupe, from Middle French [Term?].

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdypə/
  • Hyphenation: du‧pe

Noun

dupe m (plural dupes)

  1. victim

Synonyms

  • slachtoffer

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dyp/
  • (Quebec) IPA(key): /dzʏp/

Verb

dupe

  1. first-person singular present indicative of duper
  2. third-person singular present indicative of duper
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of duper
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of duper
  5. second-person singular imperative of duper

Noun

dupe f (plural dupes)

  1. A person who has been deceived, see dupe.

Further reading

  • “dupe” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *dupę

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dûpe/

Noun

dȕpe n (Cyrillic spelling ду̏пе)

  1. (vulgar) ass
    Synonym: gùzica

Declension



English

Etymology

From Middle French victime, from Latin victima (sacrificial animal).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈvɪktɪm/
  • (weak vowel merger) IPA(key): /ˈvɪktəm/
  • Hyphenation: vic‧tim

Noun

victim (plural victims)

  1. One that is harmed—killed, injured, subjected to oppression, deceived, or otherwise adversely affected—by someone or something, especially another person or event, force, or condition; in particular:
    the youngest victims of the brutal war
    victim of a bad decision by a rushed and overworked judge
    • 2014, Holger H. Herwig, The First World War: Germany and Austria-Hungary 1914-1918, A&C Black (→ISBN), page 116:
      Flexibility, one of the hallmarks of German military doctrine, was a victim of the war.
    1. One who is harmed or killed by a crime or scam.
      victims of assault; the murderer’s victims
      became another victim of the latest scam
    2. One who is harmed or killed by an accident or illness.
      a fundraiser for victims of AIDS; a victim of a car crash
    3. One who is harmed or killed as a result of other people’s biases, emotions or incompetence, or their own.
      a victim of his own pride; a victim of her own incompetence
      the newcomer never managed to make friends, a victim of the town’s deep distrust of outsiders
      a victim of sexism; victims of a racist system
    4. One who is harmed or killed as a result of a natural or man-made disaster or impersonal condition.
      relief efforts to help victims of the hurricane
      victim of an optical illusion; victim of a string of bad luck
      local businesses were the main victims of the economic downturn
      • 1970 March 12, United States House Committee on Education and Labor, Summary of Legislative Action of the House Education and Labor Committee for the 91st Congress (1st Session) / Educational Technology Act of 1969: Hearing, Ninety-first Congress, Second Session on H.R. 8838 … March 12, 1970:
        To some extent the schools and colleges are victims of conditions beyond their control: rapid population growth and mobility, country; to-city migration, unpredictable economic and social changes wrought by technology, []
  2. A living being which is slain and offered as a sacrifice, usually in a religious rite.
    1. (by extension, Christianity) The transfigured body and blood of Christ in the Eucharist.

Usage notes

Many people advise against describing a disabled person as being a victim of the condition that relates to their status as a disabled person and suggest describing a disabled person as having or experiencing that condition instead.

Synonyms

  • injured party

Antonyms

  • offender

Related terms

  • victimize, victimise
  • victimization, victimisation
  • victimism
  • victimist

Translations

References

  • victim at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • victim in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • victim in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

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