dweeb vs grind what difference

what is difference between dweeb and grind

English

Etymology

From 1968 US college slang, probably related to feeb.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dwiːb/
  • Rhymes: -iːb

Noun

dweeb (plural dweebs)

  1. (US, originally college slang, now general slang, derogatory) A boring, studious, or socially inept person. [From 1968.]
    • 2005, Edmund White, My Women
      No way, man, the biggest dweeb of them all with . . . Marilyn!
    • 1996, Spice Girls, Richard Stannard, Matt Rowe (writers), Spice Girls, If U Can’t Dance
      There never is a Keanu but a dweeb looking at me.
    • 1994, Dexter Holland (writer), The Offspring, Self Esteem
      I may be dumb, but I’m not a dweeb.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:dork
  • Sometimes used alongside nerd and geek; however, dweeb does not carry the same connotations of intelligence.

Derived terms

  • dweebery
  • dweebness
  • dweeby

References

Anagrams

  • bedew, bewed


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English grynden, from Old English grindan, (cognate with Dutch grinden (to grind, rare) and grind (gravel, shingle), from Proto-Germanic *grindaną, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrendʰ- (crushing). Compare Saterland Frisian griene (to grind; mill), Albanian grind (to brawl, fight).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɹaɪnd/
  • Rhymes: -aɪnd

Verb

grind (third-person singular simple present grinds, present participle grinding, simple past and past participle ground or grinded) (see usage notes below)

  1. (transitive) To reduce to smaller pieces by crushing with lateral motion.
  2. (transitive) To shape with the force of friction.
  3. (metalworking) To remove material by rubbing with an abrasive surface.
  4. (intransitive) To become ground, pulverized, or polished by friction.
  5. To move with much difficulty or friction; to grate.
  6. (sports, intransitive) To slide the flat portion of a skateboard or snowboard across an obstacle such as a railing.
  7. (transitive) To oppress, hold down or weaken.
  8. (slang, intransitive) To rotate the hips erotically.
  9. (slang) To dance in a sexually suggestive way with both partners in very close proximity, often pressed against each other.
  10. (video games, intransitive) To repeat a task a large number of times in a row to achieve a specific goal.
  11. (transitive) To operate by turning a crank.
  12. To produce mechanically and repetitively as if by turning a crank.
  13. (computing, dated) To automatically format and indent code.
  14. To instill through repetitive teaching.
  15. (slang, Hawaii) To eat.
  16. (intransitive, slang) To work or study hard; to hustle or drudge.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Farrar to this entry?)
  17. (transitive, slang) To annoy or irritate (a person); to grind one’s gears.
Usage notes
  • In the sports and video game senses, the past participle and past tense form grinded is often used instead of the irregular form ground.
  • Historically, there also existed a past participle form grounden, but it is now archaic or obsolete.
  • When used to denote sexually suggestive dancing between two partners, the past participle and past tense form grinded is almost always used.
Conjugation
Strong conjugation
Weak conjugation
Derived terms
  • bump and grind
  • grind down
  • have an axe to grind
Translations

Noun

grind (countable and uncountable, plural grinds)

  1. The act of reducing to powder, or of sharpening, by friction.
  2. Something that has been reduced to powder, something that has been ground.
  3. A specific degree of pulverization of coffee beans.
  4. A tedious and laborious task.
    Synonym: chore
  5. A grinding trick on a skateboard or snowboard.
  6. (archaic, slang) One who studies hard.
    Synonym: swot
  7. (uncountable, music) Clipping of grindcore (subgenre of heavy metal).
  8. (slang) Hustle. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
Translations

Etymology 2

From Faroese grind (pilot-whale meat).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɹɪnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɪnd

Noun

grind (plural grinds)

  1. A traditional communal pilot whale hunt in the Faroe Islands.
Synonyms
  • grindadráp

Anagrams

  • D-ring, dring

Albanian

Etymology

Either a nasal variant of grij or gërdhij, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrendʰ- (compare English grind, Lithuanian gréndžiu (to scrape, scratch). Same sense development as with grih.

Verb

grind (first-person singular past tense grinda, participle grindur)

  1. to brawl, to fight, to wrangle over

Related terms

  • grij
  • gërryej
  • gërdhij

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣrɪnt/
  • Hyphenation: grind
  • Rhymes: -ɪnt

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch grint, grinde, from Old Dutch *grinda, from Proto-Germanic *grindō (sand, pebbles).

Alternative forms

  • grinde, grinte (obsolete)
  • grint

Noun

grind n (uncountable)

  1. (geology) The materials gravel, shingle or pebbles.
Derived terms
  • grindbed
  • grindbeton
  • grinden
  • grindig
  • grindpad
  • grindweg
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: grint

Etymology 2

Germanic, perhaps from the above root as a crusty rash

Alternative forms

  • grinde

Noun

grind n (uncountable)

  1. (archaic, pathology) The diseases scabies (human), mange (canine)
Synonyms
  • schurft m
Derived terms
  • grindig (adjective)

Anagrams

  • dring

Faroese

Etymology 1

From Old Norse grind (gate)

Pronunciation

Noun

grind f (genitive singular grindar, plural grindir)

  1. A framework
  2. A grille
Declension

Etymology 2

The term is a Faroese invention. A school of pilot whales reminds of a framework (see grind above) in the sea, by swimming very close to each other. The Faroese term was loaned in many other languages; compare German Grindwal, Danish grindehval or Dutch griend.
More likely the word is related to the English word ground and refers to the whales frequently being grounded or easily driven onto ground.

Noun

grind f (genitive singular grindar, plural grindir)

  1. A school of grindahvalur (pilot whales)
  2. The tvøst (meat) and spik (blubber) of the pilot whales
  3. The act of pilot whaling, grindadráp
  4. (figuratively) An unexpected meal
Declension
Descendants
  • Belarusian: гры́нда (hrýnda)
  • Danish: grindehval
  • Dutch: griend
  • German: Grindwal
  • Icelandic: grind
  • Russian: гри́нда (grínda)
  • Ukrainian: гри́нда (hrýnda)

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /krɪnt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪnt

Etymology 1

From Old Norse grind

Noun

grind f (genitive singular grindar, nominative plural grindur)

  1. lattice, grid, grille
  2. framework
  3. (order theory) lattice
Declension

Etymology 2

From Faroese grind.

Noun

grind f (genitive singular grindar, nominative plural grindur)

  1. pilot whale

Declension

Synonyms
  • (pilot whale): grindahvalur, marsvín

Anagrams

  • girnd

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse grind

Noun

grind f or m (definite singular grinda or grinden, indefinite plural grinder, definite plural grindene)

  1. A hinged gate across a road or path where it is intersected by a fence.
  2. A framework
  3. A grille

Derived terms

References

  • “grind” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “grind” in The Ordnett Dictionary

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse grind.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡrɪnd/, /ɡrɪnː/ (example of pronunciation)

Noun

grind f (definite singular grinda, indefinite plural grinder, definite plural grindene)

  1. A hinged gate across a road or path where it is intersected by a fence.
  2. A framework
  3. A grille

Inflection

Derived terms

  • leikegrind
  • takgrind
  • trappegrind

References

  • “grind” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Norse

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *grindiz.

Noun

grind f (genitive grindar, plural grindr)

  1. a gate made of spars or bars
  2. haven, dock
  3. storehouses

Declension

Descendants

References

  • grind in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish grind, from Old Norse grind, from Proto-Germanic *grindiz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrendʰ-.

Noun

grind c

  1. A gate; door-like structure outside a building
  2. (computing) A gate, logical pathway

Declension

Anagrams

  • ringd

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