dwell vs inhabit what difference

what is difference between dwell and inhabit

English

Etymology

From Middle English dwellen (delay, live, remain, persist), from Old English dwellan (to mislead, deceive; be led into error, stray), from Proto-Germanic *dwaljaną (to hold up, delay; hesitate), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰwelH- (to whirl, swirl, blur, obfuscate), which is cognate with Old Norse dvelja and related to Proto-Germanic *dwelaną (to go astray), which underwent semantic change in its descendants. Cognates include Danish dvæle (to linger, dwell) and Swedish dväljas (to dwell, reside).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: dwĕl, IPA(key): /dwɛl/
  • Rhymes: -ɛl

Noun

dwell (plural dwells)

  1. (engineering) A period of time in which a system or component remains in a given state.
  2. (engineering) A brief pause in the motion of part of a mechanism to allow an operation to be completed.
  3. (electrical engineering) A planned delay in a timed control program.
  4. (automotive) In a petrol engine, the period of time the ignition points are closed to let current flow through the ignition coil in between each spark. This is measured as an angle in degrees around the camshaft in the distributor which controls the points, for example in a 4-cylinder engine it might be 55° (spark at 90° intervals, points closed for 55° between each).

Verb

dwell (third-person singular simple present dwells, present participle dwelling, simple past and past participle dwelt or (mostly US) dwelled)

  1. (intransitive, now literary) To live; to reside.
    • 1622, Henry Peacham (Jr.), The Compleat Gentleman
      I am fully resolved to go dwell in another house.
    • 1871, Charles John Smith, Synonyms Discriminated: A Complete Catalogue of Synonymous Words in the English Language
      The poor man dwells in a humble cottage near the hall where the lord of the domain resides.
  2. (intransitive) To linger (on) a particular thought, idea etc.; to remain fixated (on).
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      So it came about that long ere Ailie reached home it was on young Heriotside that her mind dwelled, and it was the love of him that made her eyes glow and her cheeks redden.
  3. (intransitive, engineering) To be in a given state.
  4. (intransitive) To abide; to remain; to continue.
    • 1802, William Wordsworth, Milton!-
      Thy soul was like a star and dwelt apart.

Synonyms

  • (live, reside): See also Thesaurus:reside

Derived terms

  • bedwell
  • indwell

Related terms

  • dwelling
  • dwell on, dwell upon

Translations

See also

  • abide
  • live
  • reside
  • stay

References

  • dwell in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • dwell in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Maltese

Etymology

From Italian duello, from Latin duellum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dwɛll/

Noun

dwell m (plural dwellijiet or dwelli)

  1. duel

Derived terms

  • ddwella

Middle English

Verb

dwell

  1. Alternative form of dwellen


English

Alternative forms

  • enhabit (obsolete)

Etymology

From Old French enhabiter, from Latin inhabitare (in + habitare).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈhæbɪt/
  • Hyphenation: in‧hab‧it
  • Rhymes: -æbɪt

Verb

inhabit (third-person singular simple present inhabits, present participle inhabiting, simple past and past participle inhabited)

  1. (transitive) To live or reside in.
    • 1813, Thomas Moore, The Last Rose of Summer
      O, who would inhabit this bleak world alone?
  2. (transitive) To be present in; to occupy.

Synonyms

  • (to live or reside in some place): bedwell; See also Thesaurus:reside
  • (to be present in some place): occupy

Derived terms

  • inhabitable

Related terms

  • inhabitant

Translations


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