eardrum vs tympanum what difference

what is difference between eardrum and tympanum

English

Alternative forms

  • ear drum

Etymology

ear +‎ drum

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɪəˌdɹʌm/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈiɚˌdɹʌm/
  • Rhymes: -ɪədɹʌm

Noun

eardrum (plural eardrums)

  1. (anatomy) A thin membrane that separates the outer ear from the middle ear and transmits sound from the air to the malleus.

Synonyms

  • membrana tympanica
  • tympanic membrane

Translations



English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin tympanum (a drum, timbrel, tambourine; the eardrum). Doublet of timbre and timpani.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɪm.pən.əm/
  • Rhymes: -ɪmpənəm

Noun

tympanum (plural tympanums or tympana)

  1. (archaic) a drum
  2. (anatomy, zootomy) Any of various anatomic structures in various animals with analogy to a drum head:
    1. (anatomy, zootomy) the eardrum (tympanic membrane, membrana tympanica).
    2. (anatomy, zootomy) the main portion of the middle ear: the tympanic cavity (cavitas tympani).
    3. (zootomy, entomology) a thin tense membrane covering the hearing organ on the leg or body of some insects, sometimes adapted (as in cicadas) for producing sound.
    4. (zootomy) a membranous resonator in a sound-producing organ in frogs and toads.
    5. (zootomy) (in certain birds) the labyrinth at the bottom of the windpipe.
  3. (architecture) a vertical recessed triangular space between the sides of a pediment, typically decorated
    1. the recessed triangular space within an arch, and above a lintel or a subordinate arch, spanning the opening below the arch
  4. (engineering) a drum-shaped wheel with spirally curved partitions by which water is raised to the axis when the wheel revolves with the lower part of the circumference submerged; used for raising water, as for irrigation

Derived terms

Translations

References

  • “tympanum”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  • “tympanum”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.

Latin

Etymology

Borrowed from Ancient Greek τῠ́μπᾰνον (túmpanon, a kettledrum, drum), from τῠ́πτω (túptō, to strike, beat, smite).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈtym.pa.num/, [ˈt̪ʏmpänʊ̃ˑ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈtim.pa.num/, [ˈt̪impɑnum]

Noun

tympanum n (genitive tympanī); second declension

  1. (literally, music) drum, timbrel, tambour, tambourine
    1. (figuratively) timbrel as a figure of something effeminate or enervating
  2. (transferred sense) (of things of a like shape):
    1. drum or wheel in machines for raising weights, in water organs, etc.
    2. (architecture):
      1. triangular area of a pediment
      2. panel of a door
      3. part of the clepsydra
        Synonym: phellos

Inflection

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Derived terms

  • tympanium

Related terms

Descendants

Note: see τῠ́μπᾰνον (túmpanon) for later re-borrowings from Byzantine.

References

  • von Wartburg, Walther (1928–2002), “tympanum”, in Französisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), volume 132, page 455
  • tympanum in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • tympanum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • tympanum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • tympanum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • tympanum in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • tympanum in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • tympanum in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

tympanum n

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2005; superseded by tympanon

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