earth vs land what difference

what is difference between earth and land

English

Alternative forms

  • airth (chiefly Scotland)
  • erd (dialect, rare)
  • yearth (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English erthe, from Old English eorþe (earth, ground, soil, dry land), from Proto-West Germanic *erþu, from Proto-Germanic *erþō (earth, ground, soil) (compare West Frisian ierde, Low German Eerd, Dutch aarde, Dutch Low Saxon eerde, German Erde, Danish, Swedish and Norwegian jord), related to *erwô (earth) (compare Old High German ero, perhaps Old Norse jǫrfi), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁er- (compare Ancient Greek *ἔρα (*éra) in ἔραζε (éraze, on the ground), perhaps Tocharian B yare (gravel).

Probably unrelated, and of unknown etymology, is Old Armenian երկիր (erkir, earth). Likewise, the phonologically similar Proto-Semitic *ʔarṣ́- – whence Arabic أَرْض(ʾarḍ), Hebrew אֶרֶץ(ʾereṣ) – is probably not related.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɜːθ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɝθ/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)θ

Proper noun

earth

  1. Alternative letter-case form of Earth; Our planet, third out from the Sun.

Usage notes

  • The word earth is capitalized to Earth when used in context with other celestial bodies.

Translations

Noun

earth (countable and uncountable, plural earths)

  1. (uncountable) Soil.
  2. (uncountable) Any general rock-based material.
  3. The ground, land (as opposed to the sky or sea).
  4. (Britain) A connection electrically to the earth ((US) ground); on equipment: a terminal connected in that manner.
  5. The lair or den (as a hole in the ground) of an animal such as a fox.
  6. A region of the planet; a land or country.
  7. Worldly things, as against spiritual ones.
  8. The world of our current life (as opposed to heaven or an afterlife).
  9. The people on the globe.
  10. (archaic) The human body.
  11. (alchemy, philosophy and Taoism) The aforementioned soil- or rock-based material, considered one of the four or five classical elements.
  12. (chemistry, obsolete) Any of certain substances now known to be oxides of metal, which were distinguished by being infusible, and by insolubility in water.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

Verb

earth (third-person singular simple present earths, present participle earthing, simple past and past participle earthed)

  1. (Britain, transitive) To connect electrically to the earth.
    Synonym: ground
  2. (transitive) To bury.
  3. (transitive) To hide, or cause to hide, in the earth; to chase into a burrow or den.
  4. (intransitive) To burrow.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Tickell to this entry?)

Derived terms

  • earthing
  • unearth

Translations

Anagrams

  • Erath, Harte, Heart, Herat, Herta, Rathe, Taher, Terah, Thera, hater, heart, rathe, rehat, th’are, thare


English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: lănd, IPA(key): /lænd/, [ɫeə̯nd]
  • Rhymes: -ænd

Etymology 1

From Middle English lond, land, from Old English land, lond (earth, land, soil, ground; defined piece of land, territory, realm, province, district; landed property; country (not town); ridge in a ploughed field), from Proto-West Germanic *land, from Proto-Germanic *landą (land), from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Cognate with Scots laund (land), West Frisian lân (land), Dutch land (land, country), German Land (land, country, state), Norwegian and Swedish land (land, country, shore, territory), Icelandic land (land). Non-Germanic cognates include Old Irish lann (heath), Welsh llan (enclosure), Breton lann (heath), Old Church Slavonic лѧдо (lędo), from Proto-Slavic *lęda (heath, wasteland) and Albanian lëndinë (heath, grassland).

Noun

land (countable and uncountable, plural lands)

  1. The part of Earth which is not covered by oceans or other bodies of water.
    Most insects live on land.
  2. Real estate or landed property; a partitioned and measurable area which is owned and on which buildings can be erected.
    There are 50 acres of land in this estate.
  3. A country or region.
    They come from a faraway land.
  4. A person’s country of origin and/or homeplace; homeland.
  5. The soil, in respect to its nature or quality for farming.
    wet land; good or bad land for growing potatoes
  6. (often in combination) realm, domain.
    I’m going to Disneyland.
    Maybe that’s how it works in TV-land, but not in the real world.
  7. (agriculture) The ground left unploughed between furrows; any of several portions into which a field is divided for ploughing.
  8. (Irish English, colloquial) A shock or fright.
    He got an awful land when the police arrived.
  9. (electronics) A conducting area on a board or chip which can be used for connecting wires.
  10. On a compact disc or similar recording medium, an area of the medium which does not have pits.
    • 1935, H. Courtney Bryson, The Gramophone Record (page 72)
      Now, assume that the recording is being done with 100 grooves per inch, and that the record groove is .006 inch wide. This means that the land on either side on any given groove in the absence of sound waves is .004 inch.
  11. (travel) The non-airline portion of an itinerary. Hotel, tours, cruises, etc.
    Our city offices sell a lot more land than our suburban offices.
  12. (obsolete) The ground or floor.
  13. (nautical) The lap of the strakes in a clinker-built boat; the lap of plates in an iron vessel; called also landing.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  14. In any surface prepared with indentations, perforations, or grooves, that part of the surface which is not so treated, such as the level part of a millstone between the furrows.
    1. (ballistics) The space between the rifling grooves in a gun.
  15. (Scotland, historical) A group of dwellings or tenements under one roof and having a common entry.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Verb

land (third-person singular simple present lands, present participle landing, simple past and past participle landed)

  1. (intransitive) To descend to a surface, especially from the air.
    The plane is about to land.
  2. (dated) To alight, to descend from a vehicle.
    • 1859, “Rules adopted by the Sixth Avenue Railway, N. Y.”, quoted in Alexander Easton, A Practical Treatise on Street or Horse-Power Railways, page 108:
      10. You will be civil and attentive to passengers, giving proper assistance to ladies and children getting in or out, and never start the car before passengers are fairly received or landed.
  3. (intransitive) To come into rest.
  4. (intransitive) To arrive on land, especially a shore or dock, from a body of water.
  5. (transitive) To bring to land.
    It can be tricky to land a helicopter.
    Use the net to land the fish.
  6. (transitive) To acquire; to secure.
  7. (transitive) To deliver. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  8. (intransitive) To go down well with an audience.
    Some of the comedian’s jokes failed to land.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old English hland.

Noun

land (uncountable)

  1. lant; urine

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch land, from Old Dutch lant, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lant/, [länt], [lant]

Noun

land (plural lande)

  1. country; nation

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lanˀ/, [lanˀ]
  • Rhymes: -and

Etymology 1

From Old Danish land, from Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, cognate with English land, German Land.

Noun

land n (singular definite landet, plural indefinite lande)

  1. country (a geographical area that is politically independent)
    Synonyms: stat, nation
  2. (uncountable, chiefly definite singular) country, countryside (rural areas outside the cities with agricultural production)
  3. land (part of Earth that is not covered in water)
  4. (as the last part of compounds) a large area or facility dedicated to a certain type of activity or merchandise
Usage notes

In compounds: land-, lande-, lands-.

Inflection
Derived terms

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

land

  1. imperative of lande

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɑnt/
  • Hyphenation: land
  • Rhymes: -ɑnt

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch lant, from Old Dutch lant, from Proto-West Germanic *land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Noun

land n (plural landen, diminutive landje n)

  1. land; country
  2. land (part of Earth not covered by water)
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: land
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: alanda, landi
  • Negerhollands: land, lant, lan
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: land, lantta
  • Sranan Tongo: lanti

Etymology 2

Verb

land

  1. first-person singular present indicative of landen
  2. imperative of landen

Elfdalian

Etymology

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath). Cognate with Swedish land.

Noun

land n

  1. country; nation

Declension


Faroese

Etymology 1

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Noun

land n (genitive singular lands, plural lond)

  1. land
  2. coast
  3. country, nation
  4. ground, soil
  5. the state
Declension
Related terms
  • landa

Etymology 2

From Old Norse hland, from Proto-Germanic *hlandą, from Proto-Indo-European *klān- (liquid, wet ground). Cognate with Lithuanian klanas (pool, puddle, slop).

Noun

land n (genitive singular lands, uncountable)

  1. (uncountable) urine
Declension

Gothic

Romanization

land

  1. Romanization of ????????????????

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lant/
  • Rhymes: -ant

Noun

land n (genitive singular lands, nominative plural lönd)

  1. (uncountable) land, earth, ground (part of the Earth not under water)
  2. (countable) country
  3. (uncountable) countryside, country
  4. (uncountable) land, as a mass noun, measurable in quantity
  5. (countable) tracts of land, an estate

Declension

Derived terms


Middle English

Noun

land

  1. Alternative form of lond

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɑnː/
  • Rhymes: -ɑnː

Etymology 1

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Noun

land n (definite singular landet, indefinite plural land, definite plural landa or landene)

  1. country
  2. land
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Verb

land

  1. imperative of lande

References

  • “land” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɑnː/, /lɑnd/ (example of pronunciation)

Etymology 1

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath). Akin to English land.

Noun

land n (definite singular landet, indefinite plural land, definite plural landa)

  1. country
    Noreg er eit land i nord.

    Norway is a country in the north.
  2. land
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Norse hland, from Proto-Germanic *hlandą.

Noun

land n (definite singular landet, indefinite plural land, definite plural landa)

  1. urine from livestock

References

  • “land” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą.

Noun

land n (genitive lanz, plural land)

  1. land
    • 1241, Codex Holmiensis, prologue.
      Mæth logh skal land byggæs.

      With law shall land be built.

Declension

Descendants

  • Danish: land

Old English

Alternative forms

  • lond, lænd

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath). Cognate with Old Saxon land, Old Frisian land, lond, Old Dutch lant (Dutch land), Old High German lant (German Land), Old Norse land (Swedish land), Gothic ???????????????? (land). The Proto-Indo-European root is also the source of Proto-Celtic *landā (Welsh llan (enclosure), Breton lann (heath)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɑnd/

Noun

land n

  1. land (dry portion of the Earth’s surface)
  2. a country
  3. region within a country: district, province
  4. the country, countryside
  5. owned or tilled land, an estate

Declension

Derived terms

Related terms

  • belandian (to bereave of land, dispossess)
  • belendan (to bereave of land, dispossess)
  • ġelandian (to land, to become land)
  • ġelendan (to near, land, or come into lands as wealth)
  • lendan (to come to land)

Descendants

  • Middle English: lond
    • English: land
    • Scots: laund, land
    • Yola: lhoan, lone

References

  • Joseph Bosworth and T. Northcote Toller (1898), “land”, in An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Old Irish

Noun

land ?

  1. Alternative spelling of lann

Mutation


Old Norse

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath). Cognate with Old Saxon land, Old Frisian land, lond, Old English land, lond, Old Dutch lant, Old High German lant, Gothic ???????????????? (land).

Noun

land n (genitive lands, plural lǫnd)

  1. land

Declension

Descendants

  • Icelandic: land
  • Faroese: land
  • Norn: land
  • Norwegian: land
  • Old Swedish: land
    • Elfdalian: land
    • Swedish: land
  • Old Danish: land
    • Danish: land
  • Scanian: lann
  • Gutnish: land, lande, landi

References

  • land inGeir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *land.

Cognate with Old English land, lond, Old Frisian land, lond, Dutch land, Old High German lant (German Land), Old Norse land (Swedish land), Gothic ???????????????? (land). The Proto-Indo-European root is also the source of Proto-Celtic *landā (Welsh llan (enclosure), Breton lann (heath)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɑnd/

Noun

land n

  1. land

Declension


Descendants

  • Middle Low German: lant
    • Dutch Low Saxon: laand
    • German Low German: Land
      • Plautdietsch: Launt

Old Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą.

Noun

land n

  1. land

Declension

Descendants

  • Elfdalian: land
  • Swedish: land

Polish

Etymology

From German Land, from Middle High German lant, from Old High German lant, from Proto-West Germanic *land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lant/

Noun

land m inan

  1. Land (federal state in Austria and Germany)
  2. (Poznań) countryside (rural area)
    Synonyms: prowincja, wieś

Declension

Further reading

  • land in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • land in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

Etymology

From German Land

Noun

land n (plural landuri)

  1. land (German and Austrian province)

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

From German Land.

Noun

land m (plural lands)

  1. one of the federal states of Germany

Further reading

  • “land” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish land, from Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /land/, [l̪an̪ːd̪], (colloquial) /lan/
  • Rhymes: -and

Noun

land n

  1. a land, a country, a nation, a state
  2. (uncountable) land, ground, earth, territory; as opposed to sea or air
  3. (uncountable) land, countryside, earth, ground suitable for farming; as opposed to towns and cities
  4. a garden plot, short for trädgårdsland; small piece of ground for growing vegetables, flowers, etc.

Declension

Synonyms

  • (country): nation
  • (neither sea nor air): backe, landbacke, mark
  • (ground suitable for farming): mark (owned land in general, for farming or not)

Derived terms

References

  • land in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)

Zealandic

Etymology

From Middle Dutch lant

Noun

land n (plural [please provide])

  1. land

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