earthquake vs quake what difference

what is difference between earthquake and quake

English

Etymology

From Middle English erthequake, erd-quake, corresponding to earth +‎ quake. Compare similar formations in eorþbeofung (earthquake, literally earth-shaking), eorþdyne (earthquake, literally earth-din), eorþstyring (earthquake, literally earth-stirring), eorþhrērness (earthquake, literally earth-stirring).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɜːθkweɪk/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɝθkweɪk/

Noun

earthquake (plural earthquakes)

  1. A shaking of the ground, caused by volcanic activity or movement around geologic faults. [from 14th c.]
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.2:
      Her alablaster brest she soft did kis, / Which all that while shee felt to pant and quake, / As it an Earth-quake were: at last she thus bespake.
    • 2006, Declan Walsh, The Guardian, 6 Oct 2006:
      Last year’s earthquake crushed his house, his livelihood and very nearly his leg, he said, pointing to a plastered limb that refuses to heal.
  2. (planetary geology) Such a quake specifically occurring on the planet Earth, as opposed to other celestial bodies. [from 20th c.]
    • 1988, Jürgen Oberst and Yosio Nakamura, “A seismic risk for the lunar base” in The Second Conference on Lunar Bases and Space Activities of the 21st Century, Vol. 1, p. 231-233, NASA:
      Since the response of some man-made structures to the ground motion near the epicenter is highly dependent on frequency, a significant difference in potential damage to the structures is expected between earthquakes and moonquakes.

Synonyms

Derived terms

Related terms

  • moonquake
  • seaquake
  • starquake

Translations

Verb

earthquake (third-person singular simple present earthquakes, present participle earthquaking, simple past and past participle earthquaked)

  1. (intransitive) To undergo an earthquake.
    • 1993, Gyeorgos C. Hatonn, The Best of Times: The Worst of Times (page 129)
      Watch the Philippines very closely for the next little while. There is rumbling and earthquaking deep within Pinatubo and increased earthquaking within Mayon.

See also

  • aftershock
  • earthquake engineering
  • fault line
  • Richter scale
  • seismic
  • seismograph
  • seismologist
  • seismology
  • tremor
  • tsunami

Further reading

  • earthquake on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Tectonic hazards/Earthquake on Wikiversity.Wikiversity
  • Category:Animations of earthquake impact on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons

Anagrams

  • heartquake

Scots

Alternative forms

  • yirthquake, yearthquawk

Noun

earthquake (plural earthquakes)

  1. earthquake
    Synonym: yirdquauk


English

Etymology

From Middle English quaken, from Old English cwacian (to quake, tremble, chatter), from Proto-Germanic *kwakōną (to shake, quiver, tremble), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷog- (to shake, swing), related to Old English cweċċan (to shake, swing, move, vibrate, shake off, give up) (see quitch), Dutch kwakkelen (to ail, be ailing), German Quackelei (chattering), Danish kvakle (to bungle), Latin vēxō (toss, shake violently, jostle, vex), Irish bogadh (a move, movement, shift, change).

Pronunciation

  • (General American, Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kweɪk/
  • Rhymes: -eɪk

Noun

quake (plural quakes)

  1. A trembling or shaking.
    We felt a quake in the apartment every time the train went by.
  2. An earthquake, a trembling of the ground with force.
    California is plagued by quakes; there are a few minor ones almost every month.

Translations

Verb

quake (third-person singular simple present quakes, present participle quaking, simple past and past participle quaked or (archaic) quoke or (obsolete) quook)

  1. (intransitive) To tremble or shake.
    • 1575-86, Sir Philip Sidney, The Countess of Pembroke’s Arcadia
      Dorus threw Pamela behind a tree; where she stood quaking like the partridge on which the hawk is even ready to seize.
  2. (intransitive, figuratively) To be in a state of fear, shock, amazement, etc., such as might cause one to tremble.
    • Turning back, then, toward the basement staircase, she began to grope her way through blinding darkness, but had taken only a few uncertain steps when, of a sudden, she stopped short and for a little stood like a stricken thing, quite motionless save that she quaked to her very marrow in the grasp of a great and enervating fear.
    • 1598-99, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act I, Scene I
      If Cupid have not spent all his quiver in / Venice, thou wilt quake for this shortly.
    • 1599-1602, William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Act III, Scene II
      Now could I drink hot blood / And do such bitter business as the bitter day / Would quake to look on.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, part 2, Act IV, Scene VIII
      Who honours not his father, Henry the fifth, that made all France to quake, Shake he his weapon at us, and pass by.
    • Son of man, eat thy bread with quaking, and drink thy water with trembling and carefulness.

Derived terms

  • quakebreech
  • quakebuttock
  • Quaker

Translations


German

Pronunciation

Verb

quake

  1. inflection of quaken:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. singular imperative
    3. first/third-person singular subjunctive I

Middle English

Verb

quake

  1. Alternative form of quaken

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