ease vs relief what difference

what is difference between ease and relief

English

Etymology

From Middle English ese, ays, etc., from Anglo-Norman ese (ease), from Old French eise and aise (elbow room; opportunity), of uncertain and obscure origin. Cognate with Provencal ais, Italian agio and asio, Sicilian aciu and Portuguese azo. Sometimes ascribed to Latin *asia or *asium, possibly from ansa (handle; occasion) but more likely from a Vulgar Latin *adjace(m), from Latin adjacēns, present participle of adjaceō. Alternatively, possibly from a non-Latin source such as Germanic or Celtic on the basis of the conflicting forms which appear in various Romance languages. Compare Old English īeþe (easy), Gothic ???????????????????? (azēti, ease; pleasure), *???????????????????? (*azēts, easy), Breton eaz, ez (easy), Irish adhais (easy; leisure). Compare also Frankish *ansiju (loophole, eyelet; handle, arms akimbo, elbow room). See also eath.

The verb is from Middle English esen, ultimately of the same origin.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /iːz/
  • (US) enPR: ēz, IPA(key): /iz/,
  • Rhymes: -iːz
  • Homophones: ees, E’s, ‘e’s

Noun

ease (uncountable)

  1. Ability, the means to do something, particularly:
    1. (obsolete) Opportunity, chance.
      • a. 1200, Ancrene Riwle (Cleopatra MS C.vi), p. 213:
        …Ȝef þer is eise to fulle þe dede…
    2. Skill, dexterity, facility.
  2. Comfort, a state or quality lacking unpleasantness, particularly:
    1. Freedom from pain, hardship, and annoyance, sometimes (derogatory, archaic) idleness, sloth.
    2. Freedom from worry and concern; peace; sometimes (derogatory, archaic) indifference.
    3. Freedom from difficulty.
    4. Freedom from effort, leisure, rest.
    5. Freedom from financial effort or worry; affluence.
    6. Freedom from embarrassment or awkwardness; grace.
  3. Relief, an end to discomfort, particularly:
    1. Followed by of or from: release from or reduction of pain, hardship, or annoyance.
    2. (euphemistic, obsolete) Release from intestinal discomfort: defecation.
    3. Release from constraint, obligation, or a constrained position.
    4. (clothing) Additional space provided to allow greater movement.
  4. (obsolete) A convenience; a luxury.
  5. (obsolete) A relief; an easement.

Synonyms

  • (ability): ability, dexterity, facility, skill
  • (comfort): comfort, peace
  • (freedom from worry): peace of mind
  • (freedom from effort): free time, leisure, relaxation, rest

Derived terms

Related terms

  • easy, easiness

Translations

Verb

ease (third-person singular simple present eases, present participle easing, simple past and past participle eased)

  1. (transitive) To free (something) from pain, worry, agitation, etc.
    • Elyse Saugstad, a professional skier, wore a backpack equipped with an air bag, a relatively new and expensive part of the arsenal that backcountry users increasingly carry to ease their minds and increase survival odds in case of an avalanche.
  2. (transitive) To alleviate, assuage or lessen (pain).
  3. (transitive) To give respite to (someone).
  4. (nautical, transitive) To loosen or slacken the tension on a line.
  5. (transitive) To reduce the difficulty of (something).
  6. (transitive) To move (something) slowly and carefully.
  7. (intransitive) To lessen in severity.
  8. (intransitive) To proceed with little effort.

Synonyms

  • (free (something) from pain, worry, agitation, etc): assuage, salve
  • (alleviate, assuage or lessen (pain)): allay, alleviate, assuage, lessen, reduce
  • (give respite to (someone)): give someone a break (informal), lay off (informal)
  • (loosen or slacken the tension on (something)): loosen, relax, slacken
  • (reduce the difficulty of (something)): facilitate, simplify
  • (lessen in severity): lessen, reduce
  • (proceed with little effort): cruise

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • ESEA

Middle English

Noun

ease (plural eases)

  1. Alternative spelling of ese


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɹɪˈliːf/
  • Rhymes: -iːf

Etymology 1

From Old French relief (assistance), from Old French relever (to relieve), from Latin relevare (to raise up, make light). See also relieve.

Noun

relief (countable and uncountable, plural reliefs)

  1. The removal of stress or discomfort.
  2. The feeling associated with the removal of stress or discomfort.
  3. Release from a post or duty, as when replaced by another.
  4. The person who takes over a shift for another.
  5. Aid or assistance offered in time of need.
  6. (law) Court-ordered compensation, aid, or protection, a redress.
  7. A lowering of a tax through special provisions; tax relief.
  8. A certain fine or composition paid by the heir of a tenant upon the death of the ancestor.
Synonyms
  • (removal of stress and discomfort): ease, alleviation, liss, respite
  • (feeling of removal of stress and discomfort): ease, alleviation, liss
  • (person who takes over a shift): stand-in, substitute, backup, fill-in
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Italian rilevare (to raise), from Latin relevare (to raise).

Noun

relief (countable and uncountable, plural reliefs)

  1. A type of sculpture or other artwork in which shapes or figures protrude from a flat background.
  2. The apparent difference in elevation in the surface of a painting or drawing made noticeable by a variation in light or color.
  3. The difference of elevations on a surface.
    the relief on that part of the Earth’s surface
  4. (heraldry) The supposed projection of a charge from the surface of a field, indicated by shading on the sinister and lower sides.
Synonyms
  • (type of artwork): embossing
  • (difference of elevations on a surface): texture, topography
Derived terms
  • relief map
Translations

Adjective

relief (comparative more relief, superlative most relief)

  1. (of a surface) Characterized by surface inequalities.
  2. Of or used in letterpress.

Anagrams

  • Leifer, e-filer, liefer, refile, relfie, relife

French

Etymology

Old French, from relever.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁə.ljɛf/

Noun

relief m (plural reliefs)

  1. projection, relief
  2. (geography, mineralogy) relief, surface elevation
  3. (figuratively) contrast, definition, offset (against something else)
  4. (sculpture) relief

Derived terms

  • bas-relief

Further reading

  • “relief” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Polish

Etymology

From French relief, from Old French relief (assistance), from relever (to relieve), from Latin relevare (to raise up, make light).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): //ˈrɛl.jɛf//

Noun

relief m inan

  1. relief

Declension


Romanian

Etymology

From French relief.

Noun

relief n (plural reliefuri)

  1. relief (difference of elevations on the Earth’s surface)

Related terms

  • reliefa
  • reliefare
  • reliefat

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