ease vs still what difference

what is difference between ease and still

English

Etymology

From Middle English ese, ays, etc., from Anglo-Norman ese (ease), from Old French eise and aise (elbow room; opportunity), of uncertain and obscure origin. Cognate with Provencal ais, Italian agio and asio, Sicilian aciu and Portuguese azo. Sometimes ascribed to Latin *asia or *asium, possibly from ansa (handle; occasion) but more likely from a Vulgar Latin *adjace(m), from Latin adjacēns, present participle of adjaceō. Alternatively, possibly from a non-Latin source such as Germanic or Celtic on the basis of the conflicting forms which appear in various Romance languages. Compare Old English īeþe (easy), Gothic ???????????????????? (azēti, ease; pleasure), *???????????????????? (*azēts, easy), Breton eaz, ez (easy), Irish adhais (easy; leisure). Compare also Frankish *ansiju (loophole, eyelet; handle, arms akimbo, elbow room). See also eath.

The verb is from Middle English esen, ultimately of the same origin.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /iːz/
  • (US) enPR: ēz, IPA(key): /iz/,
  • Rhymes: -iːz
  • Homophones: ees, E’s, ‘e’s

Noun

ease (uncountable)

  1. Ability, the means to do something, particularly:
    1. (obsolete) Opportunity, chance.
      • a. 1200, Ancrene Riwle (Cleopatra MS C.vi), p. 213:
        …Ȝef þer is eise to fulle þe dede…
    2. Skill, dexterity, facility.
  2. Comfort, a state or quality lacking unpleasantness, particularly:
    1. Freedom from pain, hardship, and annoyance, sometimes (derogatory, archaic) idleness, sloth.
    2. Freedom from worry and concern; peace; sometimes (derogatory, archaic) indifference.
    3. Freedom from difficulty.
    4. Freedom from effort, leisure, rest.
    5. Freedom from financial effort or worry; affluence.
    6. Freedom from embarrassment or awkwardness; grace.
  3. Relief, an end to discomfort, particularly:
    1. Followed by of or from: release from or reduction of pain, hardship, or annoyance.
    2. (euphemistic, obsolete) Release from intestinal discomfort: defecation.
    3. Release from constraint, obligation, or a constrained position.
    4. (clothing) Additional space provided to allow greater movement.
  4. (obsolete) A convenience; a luxury.
  5. (obsolete) A relief; an easement.

Synonyms

  • (ability): ability, dexterity, facility, skill
  • (comfort): comfort, peace
  • (freedom from worry): peace of mind
  • (freedom from effort): free time, leisure, relaxation, rest

Derived terms

Related terms

  • easy, easiness

Translations

Verb

ease (third-person singular simple present eases, present participle easing, simple past and past participle eased)

  1. (transitive) To free (something) from pain, worry, agitation, etc.
    • Elyse Saugstad, a professional skier, wore a backpack equipped with an air bag, a relatively new and expensive part of the arsenal that backcountry users increasingly carry to ease their minds and increase survival odds in case of an avalanche.
  2. (transitive) To alleviate, assuage or lessen (pain).
  3. (transitive) To give respite to (someone).
  4. (nautical, transitive) To loosen or slacken the tension on a line.
  5. (transitive) To reduce the difficulty of (something).
  6. (transitive) To move (something) slowly and carefully.
  7. (intransitive) To lessen in severity.
  8. (intransitive) To proceed with little effort.

Synonyms

  • (free (something) from pain, worry, agitation, etc): assuage, salve
  • (alleviate, assuage or lessen (pain)): allay, alleviate, assuage, lessen, reduce
  • (give respite to (someone)): give someone a break (informal), lay off (informal)
  • (loosen or slacken the tension on (something)): loosen, relax, slacken
  • (reduce the difficulty of (something)): facilitate, simplify
  • (lessen in severity): lessen, reduce
  • (proceed with little effort): cruise

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • ESEA

Middle English

Noun

ease (plural eases)

  1. Alternative spelling of ese


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɪɫ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪl

Etymology 1

From Middle English stille (motionless, stationary), from Old English stille (still, quiet, calm; without motion, at rest, not moving from a place, not disturbed; moving little or gently; silent; not loud; secret; unchanging, undisturbed, stable, fixed; not vehement, gentle), from Proto-West Germanic *stillī (quiet, still), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)telH- (to be silent; to be still). Cognate with Scots stil (still), Saterland Frisian stil (motionless, calm, quiet), West Frisian stil (quiet, still), Dutch stil (quiet, silent, still), Low German still (quiet, still), German still (still, quiet, tranquil, silent), Swedish stilla (quiet, silent, peaceful), Icelandic stilltur (set, quiet, calm, still). Related to stall.

(noun: Falkland Islander): Military slang, short for still a Benny, since the military had been instructed not to refer to the islanders by the derogatory term Benny (which see).

Alternative forms

  • stil
  • stille, styll, stylle (obsolete)

Adjective

still (comparative stiller or more still, superlative stillest or most still)

  1. Not moving; calm.
  2. Not effervescing; not sparkling.
  3. Uttering no sound; silent.
    • c. 1711, Joseph Addison, How are thy Servants blest, O Lord!
      The sea that roared at thy command, / At thy command was still.
  4. (not comparable) Having the same stated quality continuously from a past time
  5. Comparatively quiet or silent; soft; gentle; low.
  6. (obsolete) Constant; continual.
Synonyms
  • (not moving): fixed, stationary, unmoving, static, inert, stagnant; see also Thesaurus:stationary or Thesaurus:immobile
  • (not effervescing): flat, uneffervescent; see also Thesaurus:noneffervescent
  • (uttering no sound): noiseless, soundless; see also Thesaurus:silent
  • (having the same stated quality):
  • (comparatively quiet): hushed, tranquil; see also Thesaurus:quiet
  • (constant, continual): incessant, ongoing, unremitting; see also Thesaurus:continuous
Derived terms
  • still life
  • stillness
  • unstill
Related terms
  • be still my heart
  • be still my beating heart
  • still waters run deep
Translations

Adverb

still (not comparable)

  1. Without motion.
  2. (aspect) Up to a time, as in the preceding time.
  3. (degree) To an even greater degree. Used to modify comparative adjectives or adverbs.
    (“still” and “taller” can easily swap places here)
  4. (conjunctive) Nevertheless.
    • 1817, Thomas Moore, Lalla-Rookh
      As sunshine, broken in the rill, / Though turned astray, is sunshine still.
  5. (archaic, poetic) Always; invariably; constantly; continuously.
    • The desire of fame betrays an ambitious man into indecencies that lessen his reputation; he is still afraid lest any of his actions should be thrown away in private.
    • 1661, Robert Boyle, Unsucceeding Experiments
      Chemists would be rich if they could still do in great quantities what they have sometimes done in little.
  6. (extensive) Even, yet.
Synonyms
  • (without motion): akinetically, motionlessly, stock still, stockishly
  • (up to a time): yet
  • (to an even greater degree): yet, even
  • (nevertheless): nonetheless, though, yet; see also Thesaurus:nevertheless
  • (always): consistently, invariably, uniformly; See also Thesaurus:uniformly
  • (even, yet):
Translations

Noun

still (plural stills)

  1. A period of calm or silence.
  2. (photography) A photograph, as opposed to movie footage.
  3. (slang) A resident of the Falkland Islands.
  4. A steep hill or ascent.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of W. Browne to this entry?)
Synonyms
  • (period of calm): lull, rest, respite; quiet, tranquility
  • (resident of the Falkland Islands): Benny, Falklander, Kelper
Translations

Etymology 2

Via Middle English [Term?], ultimately from Latin stilla.

Noun

still (plural stills)

  1. A device for distilling liquids.
  2. (catering) A large water boiler used to make tea and coffee.
  3. (catering) The area in a restaurant used to make tea and coffee, separate from the main kitchen.
  4. A building where liquors are distilled; a distillery.
Translations
See also
  • pot still

Etymology 3

From Old English stillan.

Verb

still (third-person singular simple present stills, present participle stilling, simple past and past participle stilled)

  1. To calm down, to quiet.
Synonyms
  • becalm, lull, quell; see also Thesaurus:pacify
Translations

Etymology 4

Aphetic form of distil, or from Latin stillare.

Verb

still (third-person singular simple present stills, present participle stilling, simple past and past participle stilled)

  1. (obsolete) To trickle, drip.
  2. To cause to fall by drops.
  3. To expel spirit from by heat, or to evaporate and condense in a refrigeratory; to distill.

Translations

Anagrams

  • Tills, lilts, tills

German

Etymology

From Middle High German [Term?], from Old High German stilli.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃtɪl/

Adjective

still (comparative stiller, superlative am stillsten)

  1. quiet, silent

Declension

Adverb

still

  1. quietly, silently

Further reading

  • “still” in Duden online

Hunsrik

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃtil/

Adjective

still

  1. quiet, silent

Further reading

  • Online Hunsrik Dictionary

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɪl/
  • Rhymes: -ɪl

Verb

still

  1. imperative of stille

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

Verb

still

  1. imperative of stilla

Etymology 2

Adjective

still (masculine and feminine still, neuter stilt, definite singular and plural stille, comparative stillare, indefinite superlative stillast, definite superlative stillaste)

  1. Alternative form of stille

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /esˈtil/, [esˈt̪il]

Noun

still m (plural stills)

  1. (photography) still

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