easy vs loose what difference

what is difference between easy and loose

English

Alternative forms

  • aisy (dialectal, archaic)
  • easie (obsolete)
  • eazy (eye dialect)
  • EZ (abbreviation, US, informal)

Etymology

From Middle English eesy, esy, partly from Middle English ese (ease) + -y, equivalent to ease +‎ -y, and partly from Old French aisié (eased, at ease, at leisure), past participle of aisier (to put at ease), from aise (empty space, elbow room, opportunity), of uncertain origin. See ease. Merged with Middle English ethe, eathe (easy), from Old English īeþe, from Proto-Germanic *auþuz, from Proto-Indo-European *aut- (empty, lonely). Compare also Old Saxon ōþi, Old High German ōdi, Old Norse auðr, all meaning “easy, vacant, empty.” More at ease, eath.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈiːzi/, /ˈiːzɪ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈizi/
  • Rhymes: -iːzi

Adjective

easy (comparative easier or more easy, superlative easiest or most easy)

  1. (now rare except in certain expressions) Comfortable; at ease.
  2. Requiring little skill or effort.
  3. Causing ease; giving comfort, or freedom from care or labour.
    Rich people live in easy circumstances.
    an easy chair
  4. Free from constraint, harshness, or formality; unconstrained; smooth.
    easy manners; an easy style
  5. (informal, derogatory, of a woman) Consenting readily to sex.
  6. Not making resistance or showing unwillingness; tractable; yielding; compliant.
    • He gain’d their easy hearts.
  7. (finance, dated) Not straitened as to money matters; opposed to tight.
    The market is easy.

Synonyms

  • (comfortable): relaxed, relaxing
  • (not difficult): light, eath
  • (consenting readily to sex): fast
  • (requiring little skill or effort): soft, trivial
  • See also Thesaurus:easy

Antonyms

  • (comfortable, at ease): uneasy, anxious
  • (requiring little skill or effort): difficult, hard, uneasy, uneath, challenging

Derived terms

Related terms

  • ease

Descendants

  • Faroese: isi
  • Finnish: iisi

Translations

Adverb

easy (comparative easier, superlative easiest)

  1. In a relaxed or casual manner.
  2. In a manner without strictness or harshness.
  3. Used an intensifier for large magnitudes.
  4. Not difficult, not hard. (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Derived terms

  • breathe easy

Noun

easy (plural easies)

  1. Something that is easy

Verb

easy (third-person singular simple present easies, present participle easying, simple past and past participle easied)

  1. (rowing) Synonym of easy-oar

Anagrams

  • Ayes, Saye, Seay, ayes, eyas, saye, yaes, yeas

Middle English

Adjective

easy

  1. Alternative form of esy

Adverb

easy

  1. Alternative form of esy


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English loos, los, lous, from Old Norse lauss, from Proto-Germanic *lausaz, whence also -less, leasing; from Proto-Indo-European *lewH-, *lū- (to untie, set free, separate), whence also lyo-, -lysis, via Ancient Greek.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: lo͞os, IPA(key): /luːs/
  • Rhymes: -uːs

Verb

loose (third-person singular simple present looses, present participle loosing, simple past and past participle loosed)

  1. (transitive) To let loose, to free from restraints.
  2. (transitive) To unfasten, to loosen.
  3. (transitive) To make less tight, to loosen.
  4. (intransitive) Of a grip or hold, to let go.
  5. (archery) To shoot (an arrow).
  6. (obsolete) To set sail.
    • 1611: King James Bible, Acts 13:13
      Now when Paul and his company loosed from Paphos, they came to Perga in Pamphylia: and John departing from them returned to Jerusalem.
  7. (obsolete) To solve; to interpret.
    • he had red her riddle, which no wight
      Could ever loose
Synonyms
  • (let loose): free, release
  • (unfasten): loosen, unbind, undo, unfasten, untie
  • (make less tight): loosen, relax, slacken
  • (of grip or hold): let go, release
  • (archery): fire, shoot
Antonyms
  • (let loose): bind, constrain
  • (unfasten): bind, fasten, tie
  • (make less tight): tighten
  • (of grip or hold): tighten
  • (archery): fast

Derived terms

  • loose off
Translations

Adjective

loose (comparative looser, superlative loosest)

  1. Not fixed in place tightly or firmly.
  2. Not held or packaged together.
  3. Not under control.
  4. Not fitting closely
  5. Not compact.
  6. Relaxed.
  7. Not precise or exact; vague; indeterminate.
    • 1858, William Whewell, The history of scientific ideas
      The comparison employed [] must be considered rather as a loose analogy than as an exact scientific explanation.
  8. Indiscreet.
  9. (somewhat dated) Free from moral restraint; immoral, unchaste.
    • 1819, Lord Byron, Don Juan, I:
      In all these he was much and deeply read; / But not a page of any thing that’s loose, / Or hints continuation of the species, / Was ever suffer’d, lest he should grow vicious.
  10. (not comparable, sports) Not being in the possession of any competing team during a game.
  11. (dated) Not costive; having lax bowels.
  12. (of volumes of materials) Measured loosely stacked or disorganized (such as of firewood).
    Coordinate terms: stacked, solid
Synonyms
  • (not fixed in place tightly or firmly): unfastened, unsecured; see also Thesaurus:loose
  • (not held or packaged together): separate, unpackaged
  • (not bound or tethered or leashed): free, untethered
  • (not fitting closely): baggy; see also Thesaurus:loose-fitting
  • (not compact): diffuse, spaced out; see also Thesaurus:diffuse
  • (relaxed): loose-limbed, relaxed; see also Thesaurus:carefree
  • (indiscreet): indiscreet
  • (promiscuous): polygamous, promiscuous, slutty, tarty, whorish; see also Thesaurus:promiscuous
Antonyms
  • (not fixed in place tightly or firmly): firm, tight; see also Thesaurus:tight
  • (not held or packaged together): packaged
  • (not bound or tethered or leashed): bound, leashed, tethered, tied, tied up
  • (not fitting closely): close-fitting, snug, tight; see also Thesaurus:close-fitting
  • (not compact): compact, firm; see also Thesaurus:compact
  • (relaxed): tense, tensed
  • (indiscreet): discreet
  • (promiscuous): faithful, monogamous
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

loose (plural looses)

  1. (archery) The release of an arrow.
  2. (obsolete) A state of laxity or indulgence; unrestrained freedom, abandonment.
  3. (rugby) All play other than set pieces (scrums and line-outs).
    • 2011, Tom Fordyce, Rugby World Cup 2011: England 12-19 France [4]
      The defeat will leave manager Martin Johnson under pressure after his gamble of pairing Jonny Wilkinson and Toby Flood at 10 and 12 failed to ignite the England back line, while his forwards were repeatedly second best at the set-piece and in the loose.
  4. Freedom from restraint.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Prior to this entry?)
    • Vent all its griefs, and give a loose to sorrow.
    • The doctor now interposed, and prevented the effects of a wrath which was kindling between Jones and Thwackum; after which the former gave a loose to mirth, sang two or three amorous songs, and fell into every frantic disorder which unbridled joy is apt to inspire []
  5. A letting go; discharge.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ben Jonson to this entry?)
Derived terms
  • give a loose

Interjection

loose

  1. (archery) begin shooting; release your arrows
Antonyms
  • (archery: begin shooting): fast
Translations

Related terms

  • forlorn
  • lyo-, ly-
  • -lysis
  • lysis

Etymology 2

Verb

loose

  1. Misspelling of lose.
    I’m going to loose this game.
Derived terms
  • looser

Anagrams

  • oleos

French

Etymology

Hypercorrectively from English lose or from looseur.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /luz/

Noun

loose f (uncountable)

  1. Great pettiness, shabbiness

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