easy vs pleasant what difference

what is difference between easy and pleasant

English

Alternative forms

  • aisy (dialectal, archaic)
  • easie (obsolete)
  • eazy (eye dialect)
  • EZ (abbreviation, US, informal)

Etymology

From Middle English eesy, esy, partly from Middle English ese (ease) + -y, equivalent to ease +‎ -y, and partly from Old French aisié (eased, at ease, at leisure), past participle of aisier (to put at ease), from aise (empty space, elbow room, opportunity), of uncertain origin. See ease. Merged with Middle English ethe, eathe (easy), from Old English īeþe, from Proto-Germanic *auþuz, from Proto-Indo-European *aut- (empty, lonely). Compare also Old Saxon ōþi, Old High German ōdi, Old Norse auðr, all meaning “easy, vacant, empty.” More at ease, eath.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈiːzi/, /ˈiːzɪ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈizi/
  • Rhymes: -iːzi

Adjective

easy (comparative easier or more easy, superlative easiest or most easy)

  1. (now rare except in certain expressions) Comfortable; at ease.
  2. Requiring little skill or effort.
  3. Causing ease; giving comfort, or freedom from care or labour.
    Rich people live in easy circumstances.
    an easy chair
  4. Free from constraint, harshness, or formality; unconstrained; smooth.
    easy manners; an easy style
  5. (informal, derogatory, of a woman) Consenting readily to sex.
  6. Not making resistance or showing unwillingness; tractable; yielding; compliant.
    • He gain’d their easy hearts.
  7. (finance, dated) Not straitened as to money matters; opposed to tight.
    The market is easy.

Synonyms

  • (comfortable): relaxed, relaxing
  • (not difficult): light, eath
  • (consenting readily to sex): fast
  • (requiring little skill or effort): soft, trivial
  • See also Thesaurus:easy

Antonyms

  • (comfortable, at ease): uneasy, anxious
  • (requiring little skill or effort): difficult, hard, uneasy, uneath, challenging

Derived terms

Related terms

  • ease

Descendants

  • Faroese: isi
  • Finnish: iisi

Translations

Adverb

easy (comparative easier, superlative easiest)

  1. In a relaxed or casual manner.
  2. In a manner without strictness or harshness.
  3. Used an intensifier for large magnitudes.
  4. Not difficult, not hard. (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Derived terms

  • breathe easy

Noun

easy (plural easies)

  1. Something that is easy

Verb

easy (third-person singular simple present easies, present participle easying, simple past and past participle easied)

  1. (rowing) Synonym of easy-oar

Anagrams

  • Ayes, Saye, Seay, ayes, eyas, saye, yaes, yeas

Middle English

Adjective

easy

  1. Alternative form of esy

Adverb

easy

  1. Alternative form of esy


English

Etymology

Partly from Old French plaisant, partly from Middle English [Term?], present participle of English please. Related to Dutch plezant (full of fun or pleasure).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈplɛzənt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛzənt

Adjective

pleasant (comparative pleasanter or more pleasant, superlative pleasantest or most pleasant)

  1. Giving pleasure; pleasing in manner.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Psalm 133.1,[1]
      Behold, how good and pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity!
    • 1871, Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass, Chapter ,[2]
      “O Oysters, come and walk with us!”
      The Walrus did beseech.
      “A pleasant walk, a pleasant talk,
      Along the briny beach:
    • 1989, Hilary Mantel, Fludd, New York: Henry Holt, 2000, Chapter 2, p. 25,[3]
      [] If you pray to St. Anne before twelve o’clock on a Wednesday, you’ll get a pleasant surprise before the end of the week.”
  2. (obsolete) Facetious, joking.
    • c. 1598, William Shakespeare, Henry V, Act I, Scene 2,[4]
      [] tell the pleasant prince this mock of his
      Hath turn’d his balls to gun-stones []
    • 1600, Thomas Dekker, The Shoemaker’s Holiday, London, Dedication,[5]
      [] I present you here with a merrie conceited Comedie, called the Shoomakers Holyday, acted by my Lorde Admiralls Players this present Christmasse, before the Queenes most excellent Maiestie. For the mirth and pleasant matter, by her Highnesse graciously accepted; being indeede no way offensiue.

Synonyms

  • agreeable
  • nice

Antonyms

  • disagreeable
  • nasty
  • unpleasant

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

pleasant (plural pleasants)

  1. (obsolete) A wit; a humorist; a buffoon.
    • 1603, Philemon Holland (translator), The Philosophie, commonlie called the Morals written by the learned philosopher Plutarch of Chæronea, London, p. 1144,[6]
      [] Galba was no better than one of the buffons or pleasants that professe to make folke merry and to laugh.
    • 1696, uncredited translator, The General History of the Quakers by Gerard Croese, London: John Dunton, Book 2, p. 96,[7]
      Yea, in the Courts of Kings and Princes, their Fools, and Pleasants, which they kept to relax them from grief and pensiveness, could not show themselves more dexterously ridiculous, than by representing the Quakers, or aping the motions of their mouth, voice, gesture, and countenance:

Anagrams

  • planates, platanes

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