easygoing vs soft what difference

what is difference between easygoing and soft

English

Alternative forms

  • easy-going

Etymology

easy +‎ going

Adjective

easygoing (comparative more easygoing, superlative most easygoing)

  1. (of a person) calm, relaxed, casual and informal
  2. (of a journey or pace) unhurried

Translations



English

Etymology

From Middle English softe, from Old English sōfte, alteration of earlier sēfte (soft), from Proto-West Germanic *samftī (level, even, smooth, soft, gentle) (compare *sōmiz (agreeable, fitting)), from Proto-Indo-European *semptio-, *semtio-, from *sem- (one, whole). Cognate with West Frisian sêft (gentle; soft), Dutch zacht (soft), German Low German sacht (soft), German sanft (soft, yielding), Old Norse sœmr (agreeable, fitting), samr (same). More at seem, same.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: sŏft, IPA(key): /sɒft/
    • (Conservative RP) IPA(key): /sɔːft/
  • (General American) enPR: sôft, IPA(key): /sɔft/
  • (cotcaught merger, Canada) IPA(key): /sɑft/, enPR: sŏft
  • Rhymes: -ɒft

Adjective

soft (comparative softer, superlative softest)

  1. Easily giving way under pressure.
  2. (of cloth or similar material) Smooth and flexible; not rough, rugged, or harsh.
  3. (of a sound) Quiet.
  4. Gentle.
    There was a soft breeze blowing.
    • c. 1533, William Tyndale, An exposicion upon of Mathew
      The meek or soft shall inherit the earth.
  5. Expressing gentleness or tenderness; mild; conciliatory; courteous; kind.
    • 1815, William Wordsworth, To a Highland Girl
      A face with gladness overspread, / Soft smiles, by human kindness bred.
  6. Gentle in action or motion; easy.
  7. Weak in character; impressible.
    • 1665, Joseph Glanvill, Scepsis Scientifica
      The deceiver soon found this soft place of Adam’s.
  8. Requiring little or no effort; easy.
    • 1892, Robert Louis Stevenson, The Beach of Falesá
      Before that they had been a good deal on the move, trekking about after the white man, who was one of those rolling stones that keep going round after a soft job.
  9. Not bright or intense.
  10. Having a slight angle from straight.
  11. (linguistics) Voiced; sonant.
    • 1954, J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings
      DH represents the voiced (soft) th of English these clothes.
  12. (linguistics, rare) voiceless
  13. (linguistics, Slavic languages) palatalized
  14. (slang) Lacking strength or resolve; not tough, wimpy.
  15. (of water) Low in dissolved calcium compounds.
  16. (Britain, colloquial) Foolish.
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Essential Anatomy of Melancholy
      He made soft fellows stark noddies, and such as were foolish quite mad.
  17. (physics) Of a ferromagnetic material; a material that becomes essentially non-magnetic when an external magnetic field is removed, a material with a low magnetic coercivity. (compare hard)
  18. (of a person) Physically or emotionally weak.
  19. Incomplete, or temporary; not a full action.
  20. (Britain, of a man) Effeminate.
    • 1650, Jeremy Taylor, The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living
      A longing after sensual pleasures is a dissolution of the spirit of a man, and makes it loose, soft, and wandering.
  21. Agreeable to the senses.
  22. Not harsh or offensive to the sight; not glaring or jagged; pleasing to the eye.
    • 1673, Edward Browne, A Brief Account of some Travels in Hungaria, Styria, Bulgaria, Thessaly, Austria, Serbia, Carynthia, Carniola, and Friuli
      The sun, shining upon the upper part of the clouds [] made the softest lights imaginable.
  23. (photography, of light) Made up of nonparallel rays, tending to wrap around a subject and produce diffuse shadows.
  24. (computing) Emulated with software; not physically real.
  25. (of a drug) Not likely to cause addiction.

Synonyms

  • (giving way under pressure): see Thesaurus:soft
  • (of a cloth): non-abrasive, fluffy
  • (gentle): gentle, light, nesh
  • (of a sound): quiet
  • (lacking strength or resolve): meek, mild, wimpy, nesh
  • (foolish): daft, foolish, silly, stupid

Antonyms

  • (giving way under pressure): hard, resistant, solid, stony
  • (of a cloth): abrasive, scratchy
  • (gentle): harsh, rough, strong
  • (acute): hard
  • (of a sound): loud
  • (lacking strength or resolve): firm, strict, tough
  • (of water): hard
  • (foolish): sensible

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • mollify

Interjection

soft

  1. (archaic) Be quiet; hold; stop; not so fast.

Adverb

soft (comparative more soft, superlative most soft)

  1. (obsolete) Softly; without roughness or harshness; gently; quietly.
    • There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger’s weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.

Noun

soft (plural softs)

  1. A soft or foolish person; an idiot.
    • 1859, George Eliot, Adam Bede Part I, Chapter 9
      It’ll do you no good to sit in a spring-cart o’ your own, if you’ve got a soft to drive you: he’ll soon turn you over into the ditch.
  2. (motorsports) Ellipsis of soft tyre (A tyre whose compound is softer than mediums, and harder than supersofts.)
  3. (colloquial) A soft sound or part of a sound.
    • 2012, Sam McGuire, Paul Lee, The Video Editor’s Guide to Soundtrack Pro (page 103)
      The expander doesn’t really make the louds louder and the softs softer in one step []

Czech

Etymology

Borrowed from English soft(ware).

Noun

soft m

  1. (colloquial) software, program
    • 18 March 1999, CD-R 74min X 80min, Group cz.comp.ibmpc:
      Zajimalo by mne, zda jsou tyto CD schopna pracovat na plnou kapacitu s normalnimi vypalovackami a beznym softem nebo je na ne potreba mit extra vypalovadlo i soft?
    • 19 March 2009, Zalohovaci SW, Group cz.talk:
      Pokud těch dat máte víc, pak tím TARem stačí zálohovat základ systému a zbytek řešit zálohovacím softem, kterej umí dělit archiv na několik pásek.
    • 2 April 2010, gsm modul / telefon, Group cz.comp.linux:
      ma nekdo nejake zkusenosti s takovym zarizenim ci softem kterym to ovladat?

Declension

Further reading

  • soft in Kartotéka Novočeského lexikálního archivu
  • soft in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English soft.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɔft/

Noun

soft m (plural softs)

  1. (sexuality) soft porn
  2. (computing, uncountable) Software.
  3. (computing, countable) A piece of software.

Adjective

soft (plural softs)

  1. softcore (pornography)

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English soft.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɔft/

Adjective

soft (invariable)

  1. soft (tone etc; temporary (computing))

References


Polish

Etymology

Borrowed from English soft(ware).

Noun

soft m inan

  1. (colloquial) software, program

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