echo vs evoke what difference

what is difference between echo and evoke

English

Alternative forms

  • echoe (obsolete)
  • eccho (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English eccho, ecco, ekko, from Medieval Latin ecco, from Latin echo, from Ancient Greek ἠχώ (ēkhṓ), from ἠχή (ēkhḗ, sound).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: ĕkʹō
    • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɛkəʊ/
    • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɛkoʊ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛkəʊ

Noun

echo (countable and uncountable, plural echoes or echos)

  1. A reflected sound that is heard again by its initial observer.
  2. An utterance repeating what has just been said.
  3. (poetry) A device in verse in which a line ends with a word which recalls the sound of the last word of the preceding line.
  4. (figuratively) Sympathetic recognition; response; answer.
    • Fame is the echo of actions, resounding them.
    • 1878, Robert Louis Stevenson, Will o’ the Mill
      Many kind, and sincere speeches found an echo in his heart.
  5. (computing) The displaying on the command line of the command that has just been executed.
  6. Echo, the letter E in the ICAO spelling alphabet.
  7. (whist, bridge) A signal, played in the same manner as a trump signal, made by a player who holds four or more trumps (or, as played by some, exactly three trumps) and whose partner has led trumps or signalled for trumps.
  8. (whist, bridge) A signal showing the number held of a plain suit when a high card in that suit is led by one’s partner.
  9. (medicine, colloquial, uncountable) Clipping of echocardiography.
  10. (medicine, colloquial, countable) Clipping of echocardiogram.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

echo (third-person singular simple present echoes, present participle echoing, simple past and past participle echoed)

  1. (of a sound or sound waves, intransitive) To reflect off a surface and return.
  2. (transitive) To reflect back (a sound).
    • Those peals are echoed by the Trojan throng.
    • 1827, John Keble, The Christian Year, Christmas Day
      The wondrous sound / Is echoed on forever.
  3. (by extension, transitive) To repeat (another’s speech, opinion, etc.).
  4. (computing, transitive) To repeat its input as input to some other device or system.
  5. (intransitive, whist, bridge) To give the echo signal, informing one’s partner about cards one holds.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:imitate

Translations

Anagrams

  • Choe, HCEO, oche

Asturian

Verb

echo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of echar

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛxo/

Noun

echo n

  1. echo (reflected sound)

Synonyms

  • ozvěna

Further reading

  • echo in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • echo in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛ.xoː/
  • Hyphenation: echo

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch echo, from Latin ēchō, from Ancient Greek ἠχώ (ēkhṓ), from ἠχή (ēkhḗ, sound).

Noun

echo m (plural echo’s, diminutive echootje n)

  1. echo
    Synonym: weergalm
Derived terms
  • echoën
Descendants
  • Papiamentu: èko, echo

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

echo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of echoën
  2. imperative of echoën

Ladino

Noun

echo m (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling איג׳ו‎)

  1. work

Latin

Etymology

From Ancient Greek ἠχώ (ēkhṓ).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈeː.kʰoː/, [ˈeːkʰoː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈe.ko/, [ˈɛːkɔ]

Noun

ēchō f (genitive ēchūs); fourth declension

  1. echo

Declension

Fourth-declension noun (nominative/vocative singular in ).

Other forms:

  • Accusative singular ēchō and ēchōn; only these forms and the nominative singular are attested in ancient Latin, not the other forms mentioned above.

References

  • echo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • echo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • echo in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • echo in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • echo in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛ.xɔ/

Noun

echo n

  1. echo

Declension


Portuguese

Noun

echo m (plural echos)

  1. Obsolete spelling of eco (used in Portugal until September 1911 and in Brazil until the 1940s).

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈet͡ʃo/, [ˈe.t͡ʃo]
  • Homophone: hecho
  • Rhymes: -etʃo

Verb

echo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of echar.


English

Etymology

From French évoquer, from Latin ēvocō (to call out, summon), from ex (out) and vocō (call). Akin to voice.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -əʊk
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɪˈvəʊk/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪˈvoʊk/

Verb

evoke (third-person singular simple present evokes, present participle evoking, simple past and past participle evoked)

  1. To call out; to draw out or bring forth.
  2. To cause the manifestation of something (emotion, picture, etc.) in someone’s mind or imagination.
  3. To elicit a response.

Derived terms

  • evocable
  • reëvoke

Related terms

  • evocate

Translations


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