eclipse vs overshadow what difference

what is difference between eclipse and overshadow

English

Etymology

From Old French eclipse, from Latin eclīpsis, from Ancient Greek ἔκλειψις (ékleipsis, eclipse), from ἐκλείπω (ekleípō, I abandon, go missing, vanish), from ἐκ (ek, out) and λείπω (leípō, I leave behind).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈklɪps/, /iˈklɪps/
  • Hyphenation: eclipse

Noun

eclipse (countable and uncountable, plural eclipses)

  1. (astronomy) An alignment of astronomical objects whereby one object comes between the observer (or notional observer) and another object, thus obscuring the latter.
  2. Especially, an alignment whereby a planetary object (for example, the Moon) comes between the Sun and another planetary object (for example, the Earth), resulting in a shadow being cast by the middle planetary object onto the other planetary object.
  3. (ornithology) A seasonal state of plumage in some birds, notably ducks, adopted temporarily after the breeding season and characterised by a dull and scruffy appearance.
  4. Obscurity, decline, downfall
    • a. 1618, Walter Raleigh, quoted in Eclipse, entry in 1805, Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the English Language, Volume 2, unnumbered page,
      All the posterity of our first parents suffered a perpetual eclipse of spiritual life.
    • 1820, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Prometheus Unbound, 1839, The Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley, page 340,
      As in the soft and sweet eclipse,
      When soul meets soul on lovers’ lips.
    • 1929, M. Barnard Eldershaw, A House is Built, Chapter VIII, Section ii
      Nor were the wool prospects much better. The pastoral industry, which had weathered the severe depression of the early forties by recourse to boiling down the sheep for their tallow, and was now firmly re-established as the staple industry of the colony, was threatened once more with eclipse.
    • 1943, Fredric Brown, “The Geezenstacks”
      Aubrey was rapturous. All her other playthings went into eclipse and the doings of the Geezenstacks occupied most of her waking thoughts.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • occultation
  • syzygy

Verb

eclipse (third-person singular simple present eclipses, present participle eclipsing, simple past and past participle eclipsed)

  1. (transitive) Of astronomical bodies, to cause an eclipse.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To overshadow; to be better or more noticeable than.
    Synonym: upstage
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 3, Act 4, Scene 6, 1869, George Long Duyckinck (editor), The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, page 502,
      For, till I see them here, by doubtful fear / My joy of liberty is half eclips’d.
    • 2005, Sean Campbell, Introducing Microsoft Visual Basic 2005 for developers (page 56)
      The Util.System namespace eclipses the top-level System namespace.
    • 2007, Cincinnati Magazine (page 81)
      Everything about her year-old restaurant [] reflects her love of bringing people to the table for good, simple food that’s not eclipsed by bells and whistles.
  3. (Irish grammar) To undergo eclipsis.

Translations


Asturian

Etymology

From Latin eclīpsis.

Noun

eclipse m (plural eclipses)

  1. eclipse

Galician

Etymology

From Latin eclīpsis.

Noun

eclipse f (plural eclipses)

  1. eclipse

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /eˈkliːp.se/, [ɛˈklʲiːps̠ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /eˈklip.se/, [ɛˈklipsɛ]

Noun

eclīpse

  1. ablative singular of eclīpsis

Old French

Alternative forms

  • esclipse

Noun

eclipse m (oblique plural eclipses, nominative singular eclipses, nominative plural eclipse)

  1. eclipse

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (eclipse)

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /eˈklips(ə)/, /iˈklips(ə)/
  • Hyphenation: e‧clip‧se

Etymology 1

From Latin eclīpsis, from Ancient Greek ἔκλειψις (ékleipsis, eclipse).

Noun

eclipse m (plural eclipses)

  1. eclipse
Related terms
  • eclipsar

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

eclipse

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of eclipsar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of eclipsar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of eclipsar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of eclipsar

Further reading

  • “eclipse” in iDicionário Aulete.
  • “eclipse” in Dicionário inFormal.
  • “eclipse” in Dicionário infopédia da Língua Portuguesa. Porto: Porto Editora, 2003–2021.
  • “eclipse” in Michaelis Dicionário Brasileiro da Língua Portuguesa.
  • “eclipse” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /eˈklipse/, [eˈklip.se]

Etymology 1

From Latin eclīpsis.

Noun

eclipse m (plural eclipses)

  1. eclipse
  2. disappearance
Alternative forms
  • eclipsi (obsolete)
Derived terms
  • eclipse lunar
  • eclipse solar
Related terms
  • eclipsar

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

eclipse

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of eclipsar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of eclipsar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of eclipsar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of eclipsar.

Further reading

  • “eclipse” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.


English

Etymology

From Middle English overshadwen, overshadewen, from Old English ofersċeadwian (to overshadow), equivalent to over- +‎ shadow. Cognate with West Frisian oerskaduwe (to overshadow), Dutch overschaduwen (to overshadow), German überschatten (to overshadow), Gothic ???????????????????????????????????????????????? (ufarskadwjan, to overshadow). Compare also Old Norse yfirskyggja (to overshadow), Danish overskygge (to overshadow), Swedish överskugga (to overshadow), Old English ofersċūwan (to overshadow).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˌəʊ.vəˈʃæd.əʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌoʊ.vɚˈʃæd.oʊ/
  • Rhymes: -ædəʊ

Verb

overshadow (third-person singular simple present overshadows, present participle overshadowing, simple past and past participle overshadowed)

  1. (transitive) To obscure something by casting a shadow.
  2. (transitive) To dominate something and make it seem insignificant.
  3. (transitive) To shelter or protect.

Synonyms

  • (dominate): eclipse, outshadow, outshine, outdo, put to shame, upstage, surpass, outmatch, outstrip, dwarf

Translations


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