eclipsis vs ellipsis what difference

what is difference between eclipsis and ellipsis

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Ancient Greek ἔκλειψις (ékleipsis, disappearance, abandoning).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈklɪpsɪs/

Noun

eclipsis (countable and uncountable, plural eclipses)

  1. (obsolete) An omission of words needed to fully express the sense of a phrase
  2. A line or dash used to show that text has been omitted
  3. (Irish grammar) A mutation of the initial sound of a word by which voiceless sounds become voiced, voiced stops become nasal consonants, and vowels acquire a prothetic nasal consonant: see Appendix:Irish mutations#Eclipsis.

Synonyms

  • (mutation in Irish grammar): nasalization

Related terms

  • eclipse

Translations

References

  • Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.

Catalan

Verb

eclipsis

  1. second-person singular present subjunctive form of eclipsar

Latin

Etymology

From Ancient Greek ἔκλειψις (ékleipsis, absence, abandoning).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /eˈkliːp.sis/, [ɛˈklʲiːps̠ɪs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /eˈklip.sis/, [ɛˈklipsis]

Noun

eclīpsis f (genitive eclīpsis); third declension

  1. a solar eclipse

Declension

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

Related terms

  • eclipticus

Descendants

References

  • eclipsis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Occitan

Noun

eclipsis

  1. plural of eclipsi


English

Etymology

From Latin ellipsis, from Ancient Greek ἔλλειψις (élleipsis, omission). Doublet of ellipse.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈlɪpsɪs/

Noun

ellipsis (countable and uncountable, plural ellipses)

  1. (typography) A mark consisting of (in English) three periods, historically or more formally with spaces in between, before, and after them “ . . . ”, or more recently a single character “…” Ellipses are used to indicate that words have been omitted in a text or that they are missing or illegible.
    Synonyms: (colloquial) dot dot dot, suspension dots, suspension points
    • 2006, Danielle Corsetto, Girls with Slingshots: 114
      CARD: Hey Baby. Thanks for the … last night. Love you!
      HAZEL: Wow. I’ve never despised an ellipsis so much in my life.
  2. (grammar, rhetoric) The omission of a word or phrase that can be inferred from the context.
  3. (film) The omission of scenes in a film that do not advance the plot.
    • 2002, David Blanke, The 1910s: 219
      It was now possible for writers and directors to cut scenes that did not further the plot; called “ellipses” by filmmakers.
  4. (obsolete, geometry) An ellipse.

Translations

See also

Punctuation


Latin

Etymology

From Ancient Greek ἔλλειψις (élleipsis, omission).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /elˈliːp.sis/, [ɛlˈlʲiːps̠ɪs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /elˈlip.sis/, [ɛlˈlipsis]

Noun

ellīpsis f (genitive ellīpsis); third declension

  1. ellipsis
  2. ellipse
    • 1644, René Descartes, Principia philosophiae
      Unde sequitur ambitum ABCD non esse circulum perfectum, sed magis ad ellipsis figuram accedere

Declension

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

Descendants

References

  • ellipsis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ellipsis in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

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