economical vs scotch what difference

what is difference between economical and scotch

English

Alternative forms

  • economicall (obsolete)
  • œconomical (archaic)
  • œconomicall (obsolete)

Etymology

economic +‎ -al

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˌɛkəˈnɒmɪkəl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌɛkəˈnɑmɪkəl/

Adjective

economical (comparative more economical, superlative most economical)

  1. Careful with money so as not to spend too much; prudent; thrifty.
    He was an economical person by nature.
  2. Saving money or resources.
  3. (dated) Relating to economy in any other sense.
    • 1922, Eugen von Böhm-Bawerk, Capital and Interest: A Critical History of Economical Theory, page 218:
      By Use, then, in the sense given it by the Say-Hermann school, we have to think of an objective useful element which proceeds from goods, and acquires independent economical existence as well as independent economical value.
    • 2007, Who’s Who in the Arab World, page 312:
      Doctor in Economical Sciences.
    • 2010, New Techniques and Technologies in Mining, page 20:
      Economical function usually has anti-crisis orientation and forms stable economical development of the state.

Usage notes

Modern usage prefers economic when describing the economy of a region or country (and when referring to personal or family budgeting). Economical is preferred when referring to thrift or value for money. Cf. the adjective economy.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • economic


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /skɒtʃ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /skɑtʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒtʃ

Etymology 1

From Middle English scocchen (to cut), perhaps from Anglo-Norman escocher (to notch), from es- (intensive prefix) (from Latin ex-) + Old French coche (notch). Not related to Scotch.

Noun

scotch (plural scotches)

  1. A surface cut or abrasion.
  2. A line drawn on the ground, as one used in playing hopscotch.
  3. A block for a wheel or other round object; a chock, wedge, prop, or other support, to prevent slipping.
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 4
      He was like the scotch in the smooth, happy machinery of the home. And he was always aware of this fall of silence on his entry, the shutting off of life, the unwelcome.
Derived terms
  • hopscotch
Translations

Verb

scotch (third-person singular simple present scotches, present participle scotching, simple past and past participle scotched)

  1. (transitive) To cut or score; to wound superficially.
  2. (transitive) To prevent (something) from being successful.
    Synonyms: foil, put the kibosh on, thwart
  3. (transitive) To debunk or discredit an idea or rumor.
  4. (transitive) To block a wheel or other round object.
    Synonyms: chock, block
    • 1911, Arnold Bennett, The Card: A Story of Adventure in the Five Towns, London: Methuen Publishing, OCLC 492063506; republished Toronto, Ont.: William Briggs, 1910s, OCLC 225424669, page 69:
      The pantechnicon was running away. It had perceived the wrath to come and was fleeing. Its guardians had evidently left it imperfectly scotched or braked, and it had got loose.
  5. (transitive) To dress (stone) with a pick or pointed instrument.
  6. (transitive, textile manufacturing) To beat yarn in order to break up slugs and align the threads.
    Yarn is scotched immediately after it has been dried and while it is still warm. [1]
  7. (transitive, obsolete) To clothe or cover up.
Translations

Etymology 2

Adjective

scotch (comparative more scotch, superlative most scotch)

  1. Alternative form of Scotch (Scottish)

Noun

scotch (countable and uncountable, plural scotches)

  1. Alternative form of Scotch (whisky)

Etymology 3

From 3M’s Scotch tape.

Noun

scotch (uncountable)

  1. Scotch tape

Verb

scotch (third-person singular simple present scotches, present participle scotching, simple past and past participle scotched)

  1. (transitive, Australian rhyming slang) To rape.

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /skɔtʃ/

Etymology 1

From English scotch.

Noun

scotch m (plural scotchs)

  1. scotch (whisky)

Etymology 2

From 3M’s Scotch tape. Genericized trademark.

Noun

scotch m (uncountable)

  1. Scotch tape, sticky tape
    Synonyms: papier collant, ruban adhésif
Derived terms
  • scotcher

Further reading

  • “scotch” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈskɔt͡ʃ/

Noun

scotch m (invariable)

  1. scotch (whiskey)
  2. adhesive tape
    Synonym: nastro adesivo

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial