economy vs saving what difference

what is difference between economy and saving

English

Alternative forms

  • oeconomy, œconomy (archaic)

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin oeconomia, from Ancient Greek οἰκονομία (oikonomía, management of a household, administration), from οἶκος (oîkos, house) + νέμω (némō, distribute, allocate) (surface analysis eco- +‎ -nomy). The first recorded sense of the word economy, found in a work possibly composed in 1440, is “the management of economic affairs”, in this case, of a monastery.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /iːˈkɒn.ə.mi/
  • (General American) enPR: ĭkŏnʹəmē, əkŏnʹəmē IPA(key): /iːˈkɑn.ə.mi/, /ɪˈkɑn.ə.mi/, /əˈkɑn.ə.mi/
  • Rhymes: -ɒnəmi

Noun

economy (countable and uncountable, plural economies)

  1. Effective management of a community or system, or especially its resources.
    1. (obsolete) The regular operation of nature in the generation, nutrition and preservation of animals or plants.
      animal economy, vegetable economy
    2. (obsolete) System of management; general regulation and disposition of the affairs of a state or nation, or of any department of government.
    3. (obsolete) A system of rules, regulations, rites and ceremonies.
      the Jewish economy
    4. (obsolete) The disposition or arrangement of any work.
      the economy of a poem
  2. The study of money, currency and trade, and the efficient use of resources.
  3. Frugal use of resources.
    economy of word
    • April 5, 1729, Jonathan Swift, letter to St. John
      I have no other notion of economy than that it is the parent to liberty and ease.
  4. The system of production and distribution and consumption. The overall measure of a currency system; as the national economy.
  5. (theology) The method of divine government of the world. (See w:Economy (religion).)
  6. (US) The part of a commercial passenger airplane or train reserved for those paying the lower standard fares; economy class.
  7. (archaic) Management of one’s residency.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • economics
    • macroeconomics
    • microeconomics

Translations

Adjective

economy (not comparable)

  1. Cheap to run; using minimal resources; representing good value for money; economical.
    He bought an economy car.
    Economy size.

Adverb

economy (not comparable)

  1. (US) In or via the part of a commercial passenger airplane reserved for those paying the lower standard fares.
    Numerous web sites have tips on how to fly economy.

Translations

Anagrams

  • monoecy


English

Etymology

From save +‎ -ing.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈseɪv.ɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪvɪŋ

Noun

saving (countable and uncountable, plural savings)

  1. A reduction in cost or expenditure.
  2. (countable, usually in the plural) Something (usually money) that is saved, particularly money that has been set aside for the future.
  3. (uncountable) The action of the verb to save.
  4. (law, obsolete) Exception; reservation.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

saving

  1. present participle of save

Adjective

saving (comparative more saving, superlative most saving)

  1. (theology) That saves someone from damnation; redemptive. [from 14th c.]
  2. Preserving; rescuing.
    • He is the saving strength of his anointed.
  3. Thrifty; frugal. [from 15th c.]
    a saving cook
    • 1932, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Sunset Song, Polygon 2006 (A Scots Quair), p. 14:
      Three of her bairns were drowned at sea, fishing off the Bervie braes they had been, but the fourth, the boy Cospatric, him that died the same day as the Old Queen, he was douce and saving and sensible, and set putting the estate to rights.
  4. Bringing back in returns or in receipts the sum expended; incurring no loss, though not gainful.
    a saving bargain
    The ship has made a saving voyage.
  5. Making reservation or exception.
    a saving clause
  6. (in compound adjectives) Relating to making a saving.

Derived terms

Translations

Preposition

saving

  1. With the exception of; except; save.
    • And in the stone a new name written, which no man knoweth saving he that receiveth it.
  2. Without disrespect to.
    • a. 1796, Robert Burns, The Carle of Kellyburn Braes
      Saving your presence.

Anagrams

  • Givans, vignas

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