ecumenical vs general what difference

what is difference between ecumenical and general

English

Alternative forms

  • œcumenical
  • oecumenical

Etymology

From ecumenic +‎ -al. 

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌiːk.jʊˈmɛ.nɪ.kəl/, /ˌɛk.jʊˈmɛ.nɪ.kəl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌɛk.jʊˈmɛ.nɪ.kəl/

Adjective

ecumenical (not comparable)

  1. (ecclesiastical) Pertaining to the universal Church, representing the entire Christian world; interdenominational; sometimes by extension, interreligious. [from 16th c.]
    • 1999, Dr Martyn Percy, The Guardian, 5 Jun 1999:
      Within Europe, the church’s ecumenical partnerships have demonstrated that ecclesial unity may have political resonances.
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity, Penguin 2010, p. 215:
      Nicaea has always been regarded as one of the milestones in the history of the Church, and reckoned as the first council to be styled ‘general’ or ‘oecumenical’.
    • 2010, ‘Britain’s ancient shame in Slovenia’, The Economist, 30 Oct 2010:
      Rather touchingly, an ecumenical mass of reparation for the victims of the massacres was held on October 29, in the very English village of Great Missenden in Buckinghamshire. The service was led by the Catholic bishop of Northampton, with Archbishop Metropolitan Stres from Ljubljana and the Anglican bishop of Buckingham.
  2. General, universal, worldwide. [from 17th c.]

Synonyms

  • (general, universal): universal, worldwide

Derived terms

Translations

References



English

Alternative forms

  • generall (chiefly archaic)

Etymology

From Middle English general, in turn from Anglo-Norman general, generall, Middle French general, and their source, Latin generālis, from genus (class, kind) + -ālis (-al).

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈd͡ʒɛnɹəl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈd͡ʒɛnəɹəl/
  • Hyphenation: gene‧ral, gen‧er‧al

Adjective

general (comparative more general, superlative most general)

  1. Including or involving every part or member of a given or implied entity, whole etc.; as opposed to specific or particular. [from 13th c.]
  2. (sometimes postpositive) Applied to a person (as a postmodifier or a normal preceding adjective) to indicate supreme rank, in civil or military titles, and later in other terms; pre-eminent. [from 14th c.]
  3. Prevalent or widespread among a given class or area; common, usual. [from 14th c.]
  4. Not limited in use or application; applicable to the whole or every member of a class or category. [from 14th c.]
  5. Giving or consisting of only the most important aspects of something, ignoring minor details; indefinite. [from 16th c.]
  6. Not limited to a specific class; miscellaneous, concerned with all branches of a given subject or area. [from 16th c.]

Synonyms

  • (involving every part or member): broad, generic; see also Thesaurus:generic
  • (prevalent or widespread): typical; see also Thesaurus:common

Antonyms

  • (involving every part or member): particular, specific; see also Thesaurus:specific
  • (prevalent or widespread): abnormal, uncommon

Derived terms

Related terms

  • universal
  • common

Translations

Noun

general (countable and uncountable, plural generals)

  1. (now rare) A general fact or proposition; a generality. [from 16th c.]
  2. (military) The holder of a senior military title, originally designating the commander of an army and now a specific rank falling under field marshal (in the British army) and below general of the army or general of the air force in the US army and air forces. [from 16th c.]
  3. A great strategist or tactician. [from 16th c.]
  4. (Christianity) The head of certain religious orders, especially Dominicans or Jesuits. [from 16th c.]
  5. (nautical) A commander of naval forces; an admiral. [16th-18th c.]
  6. (colloquial, now historical) A general servant; a maid with no specific duties. [from 19th c.]
  7. (countable) A general anesthetic.
  8. (uncountable) General anesthesia.
  9. (uncountable, insurance) The general insurance industry.
Usage notes

When used as a title, it is always capitalized.

Example: General John Doe.

The rank corresponds to pay grade O-10. Abbreviations: GEN.

Coordinate terms

  • (insurance industry): health, life, pensions

Translations

See also

  • hetman

Verb

general (third-person singular simple present generals, present participle generalling or generaling, simple past and past participle generalled or generaled)

  1. To lead (soldiers) as a general.

Adverb

general (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) In a general or collective manner or sense; in most cases; upon the whole.

Anagrams

  • enlarge, gleaner, reangle

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin generālis.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /ʒə.nəˈɾal/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /d͡ʒe.neˈɾal/

Adjective

general (masculine and feminine plural generals)

  1. general

Noun

general m (plural generals, feminine generala)

  1. (military) general

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “general” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “general” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “general” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “general” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Danish

Noun

general c (singular definite generalen, plural indefinite generaler)

  1. general

Inflection


Ladin

Adjective

general m (feminine singular generala, masculine plural generai, feminine plural generales)

  1. general

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • generall, generale

Etymology

From a mixture of Anglo-Norman general, Middle French general, and Latin generālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʒɛnəˈraːl/, /ˈdʒɛnəral/

Adjective

general

  1. universal, complete
  2. comprehensive, wide-ranging
  3. general, widely useable or applicable
  4. common, widely present

Descendants

  • English: general
  • Scots: general

References

  • “ǧenerāl, adj. & n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-01.

Noun

general (plural generals)

  1. genus, class, group

References

  • “ǧenerāl, adj. & n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-01.

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

general m (definite singular generalen, indefinite plural generaler, definite plural generalene)

  1. (military) a general

Derived terms

  • generalguvernør

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

general m (definite singular generalen, indefinite plural generalar, definite plural generalane)

  1. (military) a general

Derived terms

  • generalguvernør

Old French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin generālis.

Noun

general m (oblique plural generaus or generax or generals, nominative singular generaus or generax or generals, nominative plural general)

  1. (military) general

Adjective

general m (oblique and nominative feminine singular generale)

  1. general (not limited in use or application; applicable to the whole or every member of a class or category)

Declension

Descendants

  • English: general
  • French: général

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin generālis. See also geral, from the same source.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ge‧ne‧ral
  • Rhymes: -al, -aw

Noun

general m (plural generais, feminine generala, feminine plural generalas)

  1. (military) general

Descendants

  • Tetum: jenerál

Further reading

  • “general” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French général, from Latin generālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d͡ʒe.neˈral/

Noun

general m (plural generali)

  1. general

Declension

Adjective

general m or n (feminine singular generală, masculine plural generali, feminine and neuter plural generale)

  1. general

Declension

Related terms


Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From German General, from Latin generālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡeněraːl/
  • Hyphenation: ge‧ne‧ral

Noun

genèrāl m (Cyrillic spelling генѐра̄л)

  1. (military) general

Declension


Slovene

Etymology

From German General, from Latin generālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɛnɛráːl/

Noun

generȃl m anim (female equivalent generȃlica or generȃlka)

  1. (military) general

Inflection


Spanish

Etymology

From Latin generālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xeneˈɾal/, [xe.neˈɾal]

Adjective

general (plural generales)

  1. general

Derived terms

Noun

general m (plural generales, feminine generala, feminine plural generalas)

  1. (military) general

Descendants

  • Cebuano: heneral
  • Tagalog: heneral

Further reading

  • “general” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Etymology

From German General, from Old French general, from Latin generālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jɛn(ɛ)ˈrɑːl/

Noun

general c

  1. a general; a military title
  2. an Air Chief Marshal

Declension

Descendants

  • Finnish: kenraali

References


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