edacious vs esurient what difference

what is difference between edacious and esurient

English

Etymology

From Latin edācī (gluttonous, greedy) + -ous (adjectival suffix), from edō (to eat).

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -eɪʃəs

Adjective

edacious (comparative more edacious, superlative most edacious)

  1. Having an insatiable appetite; voracious, ravenous, piggish.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:voracious

Translations

Anagrams

  • acedious


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin ēsurient, ēsurientem, from ēsuriēns (hungering), present participle of ēsuriō (to be hungry, to hunger for something), a desiderative verb from edō (to eat) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁édti (to eat)) + -turiō (suffix indicating a desire for an action).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪˈsjʊə.ɹɪ.ənt/, /ɪˈʃʊə.ɹi.ənt/, /iː-/, /ɛ-/, /ə-/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɪˈsʊ.ɹi.ənt/, /ə-/, /-ˈzʊ-/
  • Hyphenation: esu‧ri‧ent

Adjective

esurient (comparative more esurient, superlative most esurient)

  1. (formal, now often humorous) Very greedy or hungry; ravenous; (figuratively) avid, eager. [from late 17th c.]
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:voracious

Derived terms

  • esurience
  • esuriently

Related terms

  • esurine

Translations

Noun

esurient (plural esurients)

  1. One who is greedy or hungry.

Translations

See also

  • esculent

References

Anagrams

  • Turinese, neurites, retinues, reunites, unitrees, uterines

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /eːˈsu.ri.ent/, [eːˈs̠ʊɾiɛn̪t̪]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /eˈsu.ri.ent/, [ɛˈs̬uːriɛn̪t̪]

Verb

ēsurient

  1. third-person plural future active indicative of ēsuriō

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