edge vs march what difference

what is difference between edge and march

English

Etymology

From Middle English egge, from Old English eċġ, from Proto-West Germanic *aggju, from Proto-Germanic *agjō (compare Dutch egge, German Ecke, Swedish egg, Norwegian egg), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp) (compare Welsh hogi (to sharpen, hone), Latin aciēs (sharp), acus (needle), Latvian ašs, ass (sharp), Ancient Greek ἀκίς (akís, needle), ἀκμή (akmḗ, point), and Persian آس(ās, grinding stone)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛdʒ/
  • Hyphenation: edge
  • Rhymes: -ɛdʒ

Noun

edge (plural edges)

  1. The boundary line of a surface.
  2. (geometry) A one-dimensional face of a polytope. In particular, the joining line between two vertices of a polygon; the place where two faces of a polyhedron meet.
  3. An advantage.
    • 2017 August 25, Euan McKirdy et al, “Arrest warrant to be issued for former Thai PM Yingluck Shinawatra”, in edition.cnn.com, CNN:
      Thitinan said Yingluck’s decision to skip the verdict hearing will have “emboldened” the military government. “They would not have wanted to put her in jail, in this scenario, (but her not showing up today) puts her on the back foot and gives them an edge.”
  4. (also figuratively) The thin cutting side of the blade of an instrument, such as an ax, knife, sword, or scythe; that which cuts as an edge does, or wounds deeply, etc.
    • {{RQ:Shakespeare Cymbeline|3|4|line=1818|url=http://books.google.com.au/books?id=1T1SAAAAcAAJ&pg=RA3-PA49&dq=%22%5C+Whose+edge+is+sharper+than+the+sword%22&hl=en&sa=X&ei=fEqoUdyOPOeziQeSwoCICg&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=%22%5C%20Whose%20edge%20is%20sharper%20than%20the%20sword%22&f=false%7Cpassage=No, ’tis slander; / Whose edge is sharper than the sword;
    • 1833, Adam Clarke (editor), Revelations, II, 12, The New Testament, page 929:
      And to the angel of the church in Pergamos write; These things saith he which hath the sharp sword with two edges:
  5. A sharp terminating border; a margin; a brink; an extreme verge.
  6. Sharpness; readiness or fitness to cut; keenness; intenseness of desire.
    • a. 1667, Jeremy Taylor, Sermon X: The Faith and Patience of the Saints, Part 2, The Whole Sermons of Jeremy Taylor, 1841, page 69:
      Death and persecution lose all the ill that they can have, if we do not set an edge upon them by our fears and by our vices.
  7. The border or part adjacent to the line of division; the beginning or early part (of a period of time)
    • 1670, John Milton, The History of Britain, The Prose Works of John Milton, published 1853, Volume V, page 203
      supposing that the new general, unacquainted with his army, and on the edge of winter, would not hastily oppose them.
  8. (cricket) A shot where the ball comes off the edge of the bat, often unintentionally.
    • 2004 March 29, R. Bharat Rao Short report: Ind-Pak T1D2 Session 1 in rec.sports.cricket, Usenet
      Finally another edge for 4, this time dropped by the keeper
  9. (graph theory) A connected pair of vertices in a graph.
  10. In human sexuality, a level of sexual arousal that is maintained just short of reaching the point of inevitability, or climax; see also edging.

Synonyms

  • (advantage): advantage, gain
  • (sharp terminating border): brink, boundary, lip, margin, rim
  • (in graph theory): line

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Translations

References

  • edge on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

See also

  • Mathworld article on the edges of polygons
  • Mathworld article on the edges of polyhedra

Verb

edge (third-person singular simple present edges, present participle edging, simple past and past participle edged)

  1. (transitive) To move an object slowly and carefully in a particular direction.
  2. (intransitive) To move slowly and carefully in a particular direction.
  3. (usually in the form ‘just edge’) To win by a small margin.
  4. (cricket, transitive) To hit the ball with an edge of the bat, causing a fine deflection.
  5. (transitive) To trim the margin of a lawn where the grass meets the sidewalk, usually with an electric or gas-powered lawn edger.
  6. (transitive) To furnish with an edge; to construct an edging.
    • 2005, Paige Gilchrist, The Big Book of Backyard Projects: Walls, Fences, Paths, Patios, Benches, Chairs & More, Section 2: Paths and Walkways, page 181,
      If you’re edging with stone, brick, or another material in a lawn area, set the upper surfaces of the edging just at or not more than ½ inch above ground level so it won’t be an obstacle to lawn mowers.
  7. To furnish with an edge, as a tool or weapon; to sharpen.
  8. (figuratively) To make sharp or keen; to incite; to exasperate; to goad; to urge or egg on.
    • By such reasonings, the simple were blinded, and the malicious edged.
  9. (intransitive, slang) To delay one’s orgasm so as to remain almost at the point of orgasm.
    • 2012, Ryan Field, Field of Dreams: The Very Best Stories of Ryan Field, page 44
      His mouth was open and he was still jerking his dick. Justin knew he must have been edging by then.

Translations

Derived terms

(See above.)

Quotations

  • 1925, Walter Anthony and Tom Reed (titles), Rupert Julian (director), The Phantom of the Opera, silent movie
    In Mlle. Carlotta’s correspondence there appeared another letter, edged in black!

Anagrams

  • geed


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /mɑːtʃ/
  • (US) enPR: märch, IPA(key): /mɑɹtʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)tʃ

Etymology 1

From Middle English marchen, from Middle French marcher (to march, walk), from Old French marchier (to stride, to march, to trample), from Frankish *markōn (to mark, mark out, to press with the foot), from Proto-Germanic *markōną (area, region, edge, rim, border), akin to Persian مرز(marz), from Proto-Indo-European *merǵ- (edge, boundary). Akin to Old English mearc, ġemearc (mark, boundary). Compare mark, from Old English mearcian.

Noun

march (plural marches)

  1. A formal, rhythmic way of walking, used especially by soldiers, bands and in ceremonies.
  2. A political rally or parade
    Synonyms: protest, parade, rally
  3. Any song in the genre of music written for marching (see Wikipedia’s article on this type of music)
  4. Steady forward movement or progression.
    Synonyms: process, advancement, progression
  5. (euchre) The feat of taking all the tricks of a hand.
Derived terms
Related terms
  • démarche
  • volksmarch
Translations

Verb

march (third-person singular simple present marches, present participle marching, simple past and past participle marched)

  1. (intransitive) To walk with long, regular strides, as a soldier does.
  2. (transitive) To cause someone to walk somewhere.
  3. To go to war; to make military advances.
  4. (figuratively) To make steady progress.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English marche (tract of land along a country’s border), from Old French marche (boundary, frontier), from Frankish *marku, from Proto-Germanic *markō, from Proto-Indo-European *merǵ- (edge, boundary).

Noun

march (plural marches)

  1. (now archaic, historical) A border region, especially one originally set up to defend a boundary.
    Synonyms: frontier, marchland
  2. (historical) A region at a frontier governed by a marquess.
  3. Any of various territories with similar meanings or etymologies in their native languages.
    Synonyms: county palatinate, county palatine
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Verb

march (third-person singular simple present marches, present participle marching, simple past and past participle marched)

  1. (intransitive) To have common borders or frontiers
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English merche, from Old English merċe, mereċe, from Proto-West Germanic *marik, from Proto-Indo-European *móri (sea). Cognate Middle Low German merk, Old High German merc, Old Norse merki (celery). Compare also obsolete or regional more (carrot or parsnip), from Proto-Indo-European *mork- (edible herb, tuber).

Noun

march (plural marches)

  1. (obsolete) Smallage.
    Synonym: smallage
See also
  • stanmarch (Smyrnium olusatrum, alexanders)
Translations

References

Anagrams

  • charm

Atong (India)

Alternative forms

  • mars

Etymology

From English March.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mart͡ɕ/

Noun

march (Bengali script মার্চ)

  1. March

Synonyms

  • choi•etja

References

  • van Breugel, Seino. 2015. Atong-English dictionary, second edition. Available online: https://www.academia.edu/487044/Atong_English_Dictionary. Stated in Appendix 5.

Danish

Etymology

From French marche, derived from the verb marcher (to march), a Frankish loanword, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *markōną (to mark, notice). The interjection is borrowed form the French imperative of this verb.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈmɑːɕ]

Noun

march c (singular definite marchen, plural indefinite marcher)

  1. march

Interjection

march

  1. march! (an order)

Welsh

Etymology

From Proto-Brythonic *marx, from Proto-Celtic *markos.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /marχ/

Noun

march m (plural meirch)

  1. horse, steed, stallion

Derived terms

  • marchog (knight, horserider)

Compounds

  • cadfarch (steed)
  • corfarch (pony)
  • dynfarch (centaur)
  • marchddanhadlen (horse nettle)
  • marchfacrell (horse mackerel)
  • marchfintys (horsemint)
  • marchfisglen (horse mussel)
  • cacwn meirch (hornets)
  • gwenyn meirch (wasps)

Mutation

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