educator vs pedagogue what difference

what is difference between educator and pedagogue

English

Etymology

From Latin ēducātor; synchronically analyzable as educate +‎ -or.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɛdʒəkeɪtɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɛdʒʊkeɪtə/, /ˈɛdjʊkeɪtə/
  • Hyphenation: ed‧u‧ca‧tor

Noun

educator (plural educators)

  1. A person distinguished for his/her educational work, a teacher.

Translations

Anagrams

  • aeroduct, outraced

Latin

Etymology

From ēducō (bring up, rear, educate, train, or produce) +‎ -tor (agent suffix)

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /eː.duˈkaː.tor/, [eːd̪ʊˈkäːt̪ɔɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /e.duˈka.tor/, [ɛd̪uˈkɑːt̪ɔr]

Noun

ēducātor m (genitive ēducātōris, feminine ēducātrīx); third declension

  1. educator, tutor
  2. foster father

Declension

Third-declension noun.

Related terms

  • ēducātrīx

Descendants

  • Catalan: educador
  • Galician: educador
  • Italian: educatore
  • Portuguese: educador
  • Spanish: educador

Verb

ēducātor

  1. second-person singular future passive imperative of ēducō
  2. third-person singular future passive imperative of ēducō

References

  • educator in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • educator in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • educator in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Romanian

Etymology

From French éducateur, from Latin ēducātor.

Noun

educator m (plural educatori, feminine equivalent educatoare)

  1. educator

Declension



English

Alternative forms

  • pædagogue
  • pedagog
  • paedagogue

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French pedagogue, from Latin paedagōgus, from Ancient Greek παιδαγωγός (paidagōgós), from παῖς (paîs, child) + ἀγωγός (agōgós, guide) (from ἄγω (ágō, lead)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɛdəɡɒɡ/

Noun

pedagogue (plural pedagogues)

  1. A teacher or instructor of children; one whose occupation is to teach the young.
    • Jones chid the pedagogue for his interruption, and then the stranger proceeded.
  2. A pedant; one who by teaching has become overly formal or pedantic in his or her ways; one who has the manner of a teacher.
    • a. 1774, Oliver Goldsmith, essay
      And now I have gone thus far, perhaps you will think me some pedagogue, willing, by a well-timed puff, to increase the reputation of his own school
  3. (historical, Ancient Greece) A slave who led the master’s children to school, and had the charge of them generally.

Related terms

Translations

See also

Verb

pedagogue (third-person singular simple present pedagogues, present participle pedagoguing, simple past and past participle pedagogued)

  1. To teach.

References

  • Pedagogue in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Middle French

Etymology

First attested circa 1371, borrowed from Latin paedagōgus, from Ancient Greek παιδαγωγός (paidagōgós).

Noun

pedagogue m (plural pedagogues)

  1. pedagogue (one who teaches a child)

References


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