efface vs obliterate what difference

what is difference between efface and obliterate

English

Etymology

From Middle French effacer (erase), from Old French esfacier (remove the face).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /əˈfeɪs/, /ɪˈfeɪs/
  • Rhymes: -eɪs

Verb

efface (third-person singular simple present effaces, present participle effacing, simple past and past participle effaced)

  1. (transitive) To erase (as anything impressed or inscribed upon a surface); to render illegible or indiscernible.
    • 1825, Walter Scott, The Talisman, A.L. Burt Company (1832?), 15:
      An outline of the same device might be traced on his shield, though many a blow had almost effaced the painting.
  2. (transitive) To cause to disappear as if by rubbing out or striking out.
  3. (reflexive) To make oneself inobtrusive as if due to modesty or diffidence.
  4. (medicine) Of the cervix during pregnancy, to thin and stretch in preparation for labor.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • deface

Anagrams

  • Caffee

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /e.fas/

Noun

efface f (plural effaces)

  1. (Quebec) eraser

Verb

efface

  1. first-person singular present indicative of effacer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of effacer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of effacer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of effacer
  5. second-person singular imperative of effacer

Further reading

  • “efface” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Etymology

From Latin oblitterātus, perfect passive participle of oblitterō (blot out), from oblinō (smear over).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /əbˈlɪtəɹeɪt/

Verb

obliterate (third-person singular simple present obliterates, present participle obliterating, simple past and past participle obliterated)

  1. To remove completely, leaving no trace; to wipe out; to destroy.
    • 1876, William Black, Madcap Violet
      The harsh and bitter feelings of this or that experience are slowly obliterated.
    • Elbows almost touching they leaned at ease, idly reading the almost obliterated lines engraved there. ¶ “I never understood it,” she observed, lightly scornful. “What occult meaning has a sun-dial for the spooney? I’m sure I don’t want to read riddles in a strange gentleman’s optics.”

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:destroy

Related terms

  • obliteration

Translations


Italian

Verb

obliterate

  1. inflection of obliterare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of obliterato

Latin

Verb

obliterāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of obliterō

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