effect vs event what difference

what is difference between effect and event

English

Etymology

For noun: from Middle English effect, from Old French effect (modern French effet), from Latin effectus (an effect, tendency, purpose), from efficiō (accomplish, complete, effect); see effect as a verb. Replaced Old English fremming, fremednes from fremman.

For verb: from Middle English effecten, partly from Latin effectus, perfect passive participle of efficiō (accomplish, complete, do, effect), from ex (out) + faciō (do, make) (see fact and compare affect, infect) and partly from the noun effect.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪˈfɛkt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /əˈfɛkt/
  • (Malaysia, Singapore) IPA(key): /iˈfɛkt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt
  • Hyphenation: ef‧fect

Noun

effect (countable and uncountable, plural effects)

  1. The result or outcome of a cause.
  2. Impression left on the mind; sensation produced.
    • October 1832, unknown author, The Tears of Parents (in The Christian Observer Volume 32
      patchwork [] introduced for oratorical effect
    • 1832, Washington Irving, Tales of the Alhambra
      The effect was heightened by the wild and lonely nature of the place.
  3. Execution; performance; realization; operation.
    1. (uncountable) The state of being binding and enforceable, as in a rule, policy, or law.
  4. (cinematography) An illusion produced by technical means (as in “special effect”)
  5. (sound engineering) An alteration, or device for producing an alteration, in sound after it has been produced by an instrument.
  6. (physics, psychology, etc.) A scientific phenomenon, usually named after its discoverer.
  7. (usually in the plural) Belongings, usually as personal effects.
  8. Consequence intended; purpose; meaning; general intent; with to.
    • They spake to her to that effect.
  9. (obsolete) Reality; actual meaning; fact, as distinguished from mere appearance.
    • 1642, John Denham, Cooper’s Hill
      no other in effect than what it seems
  10. (obsolete) Manifestation; expression; sign.

Usage notes

Do not confuse with affect.

Adjectives often applied to “effect”:

  • biological, chemical, cultural, economic, legal, mental, moral, nutritional, personal, physical, physiological, political and social
  • actual, bad, beneficial, catastrophic, deleterious, disastrous, devastating, fatal, good, harmful, important, intended, likely, natural, negative, positive, potential, primary, real, secondary, significant, special, strong, undesirable and weak

Hyponyms

Derived terms

  • after-effect

Related terms

  • in effect
  • take effect
  • personal effects

Translations

References

Verb

effect (third-person singular simple present effects, present participle effecting, simple past and past participle effected)

  1. (transitive) To make or bring about; to implement.
  2. Misspelling of affect.

Usage notes

Effect is often confused with affect. The latter suggests influence over existing ideas, emotions and entities; the former indicates the manifestation of new or original ideas or entities:

  • “New governing coalitions have effected major changes” indicates that major changes were made as a result of new governing coalitions.
  • “New governing coalitions have affected major changes” indicates that before new governing coalitions, major changes were in place, and that the new governing coalitions had some influence over those existing changes.

Related terms

Translations

Further reading

  • effect in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • effect in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch effect, from Latin effectus. The sense ‘(equitable) security’ borrowed from German Effekt or French effet.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛˈfɛkt/
  • Hyphenation: ef‧fect
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt

Noun

effect n (plural effecten, diminutive effectje n)

  1. effect, impact
  2. (finance, usually in the plural) security, notably bond or stock
    Hypernym: waardepapier
  3. (ball games) spin (rotation of a ball)
  4. (obsolete) personal effect, belonging

Compounds

  • broeikaseffect
  • domino-effect
  • effectbal
  • effectenbeurs
  • effectenmakelaar
  • sneeuwbaleffect

Derived terms

  • effectief

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: effek
  • Indonesian: efek

References


Middle French

Alternative forms

  • effaict

Etymology

From Old French effect

Noun

effect m (plural effects)

  1. effect

Descendants

  • French: effet

Old French

Etymology

From Latin effectus

Noun

effect m (oblique plural effecz or effectz, nominative singular effecz or effectz, nominative plural effect)

  1. effect
  2. (law) judgment; decree
    • punir les contrevenantz solonc l’effect des estatut
      Punish the offender according to the decree of the statute

Descendants

  • English: effect
  • French: effet


English

Etymology 1

From Middle French event, from Latin ēventus (an event, occurrence), from ēveniō (to happen, to fall out, to come out), from ē (out of, from), short form of ex + veniō (come); related to venture, advent, convent, invent, convene, evene, etc.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈvɛnt/, /əˈvɛnt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Noun

event (plural events)

  1. An occurrence; something that happens.
  2. A prearranged social activity (function, etc.)
  3. One of several contests that combine to make up a competition.
  4. An end result; an outcome (now chiefly in phrases).
    • hard beginnings have many times prosperous events […].
    • 1707, Semele, by Eccles and Congrieve; scene 8
      Of my ill boding Dream / Behold the dire Event.
    • dark doubts between the promise and event
    In the event, he turned out to have what I needed anyway.
  5. (physics) A point in spacetime having three spatial coordinates and one temporal coordinate.
  6. (computing) A possible action that the user can perform that is monitored by an application or the operating system (event listener). When an event occurs an event handler is called which performs a specific task.
  7. (probability theory) A set of some of the possible outcomes; a subset of the sample space.
    If




    X


    {\displaystyle X}

    is a random variable representing the toss of a six-sided die, then its sample space could be denoted as {1,2,3,4,5,6}. Examples of events could be:




    X
    =
    1


    {\displaystyle X=1}

    ,




    X
    =
    2


    {\displaystyle X=2}

    ,




    X

    5
    ,
    X

    4
    ,


    {\displaystyle X\geq 5,X\not =4,}

    and




    X

    {
    1
    ,
    3
    ,
    5
    }


    {\displaystyle X\in \{1,3,5\}}

    .

  8. (obsolete) An affair in hand; business; enterprise.
  9. (medicine) An episode of severe health conditions.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations
Further reading
  • event in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • event in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Verb

event (third-person singular simple present events, present participle eventing, simple past and past participle evented)

  1. (obsolete) To occur, take place.
    • 1590, Robert Greene, Greene’s Never Too Late, in The Life and Complete Works in Prose and Verse of Robert Greene, Volume 8, Huff Library, 1881, p. 33,[1]
      [] I will first rehearse you an English Historie acted and evented in my Countrey of England []

Etymology 2

From French éventer.

Verb

event (third-person singular simple present events, present participle eventing, simple past and past participle evented)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To be emitted or breathed out; to evaporate.
    • c. 1597, Ben Jonson, The Case is Altered, Act V, Scene 8, in C. H. Herford and Percy Simpson (editors), Ben Jonson, Volume 3, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1927, p. 178,[2]
      ô that thou sawst my heart, or didst behold
      The place from whence that scalding sigh evented.
    • 1615, William Barclay, Callirhoe; commonly called The Well of Spa or The Nymph of Aberdene, Aberdeen, 1799, p. 12,[3]
      This is the reason why this water hath no such force when it is carried, as it hath at the spring it self: because the vertue of it consisteth in a spiritual and occulte qualitie, which eventeth and vanisheth by the carriage.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To expose to the air, ventilate.
    • 1559, attributed to William Baldwin, “How the Lorde Clyfford for his straunge and abhominable cruelty came to as straunge and sodayne a death” in The Mirror for Magistrates, Part III, edited by Joseph Haslewood, London: Lackington, Allen & Co., 1815, Volume 2, p. 198,[4]
      For as I would my gorget have undon
      To event the heat that had mee nigh undone,
      An headles arrow strake mee through the throte,
      Where through my soule forsooke his fylthy cote.
    • 1598, George Chapman, The Third Sestiad, Hero and Leander (completion of the poem begun by Christopher Marlowe),[5]
      [] as Phœbus throws
      His beams abroad, though he in clouds be clos’d,
      Still glancing by them till he find oppos’d
      A loose and rorid vapour that is fit
      T’ event his searching beams, and useth it
      To form a tender twenty-colour’d eye,
      Cast in a circle round about the sky []

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from English event, from Middle French event, from Latin ēventus (an event, occurrence), from ēveniō (to happen, to fall out, to come out), from ē (out of, from), short form of ex + veniō (come).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛˈvɛnt/

Noun

event

  1. An event, a prearranged social activity (function, etc.).

Declension

Related terms

  • begivenhed

See also

  • eventuel

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from English event, from Middle French event, from Latin ēventus (an event, occurrence), from ēveniō (to happen, to fall out, to come out), from ē (out of, from), short form of ex + veniō (come).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛˈvɛnt/

Noun

event n

  1. An event, a prearranged social activity (function, etc.).

Declension

Related terms

  • evenemang
  • eventuell

Anagrams

  • teven, veten

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