effect vs impression what difference

what is difference between effect and impression

English

Etymology

For noun: from Middle English effect, from Old French effect (modern French effet), from Latin effectus (an effect, tendency, purpose), from efficiō (accomplish, complete, effect); see effect as a verb. Replaced Old English fremming, fremednes from fremman.

For verb: from Middle English effecten, partly from Latin effectus, perfect passive participle of efficiō (accomplish, complete, do, effect), from ex (out) + faciō (do, make) (see fact and compare affect, infect) and partly from the noun effect.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪˈfɛkt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /əˈfɛkt/
  • (Malaysia, Singapore) IPA(key): /iˈfɛkt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt
  • Hyphenation: ef‧fect

Noun

effect (countable and uncountable, plural effects)

  1. The result or outcome of a cause.
  2. Impression left on the mind; sensation produced.
    • October 1832, unknown author, The Tears of Parents (in The Christian Observer Volume 32
      patchwork [] introduced for oratorical effect
    • 1832, Washington Irving, Tales of the Alhambra
      The effect was heightened by the wild and lonely nature of the place.
  3. Execution; performance; realization; operation.
    1. (uncountable) The state of being binding and enforceable, as in a rule, policy, or law.
  4. (cinematography) An illusion produced by technical means (as in “special effect”)
  5. (sound engineering) An alteration, or device for producing an alteration, in sound after it has been produced by an instrument.
  6. (physics, psychology, etc.) A scientific phenomenon, usually named after its discoverer.
  7. (usually in the plural) Belongings, usually as personal effects.
  8. Consequence intended; purpose; meaning; general intent; with to.
    • They spake to her to that effect.
  9. (obsolete) Reality; actual meaning; fact, as distinguished from mere appearance.
    • 1642, John Denham, Cooper’s Hill
      no other in effect than what it seems
  10. (obsolete) Manifestation; expression; sign.

Usage notes

Do not confuse with affect.

Adjectives often applied to “effect”:

  • biological, chemical, cultural, economic, legal, mental, moral, nutritional, personal, physical, physiological, political and social
  • actual, bad, beneficial, catastrophic, deleterious, disastrous, devastating, fatal, good, harmful, important, intended, likely, natural, negative, positive, potential, primary, real, secondary, significant, special, strong, undesirable and weak

Hyponyms

Derived terms

  • after-effect

Related terms

  • in effect
  • take effect
  • personal effects

Translations

References

Verb

effect (third-person singular simple present effects, present participle effecting, simple past and past participle effected)

  1. (transitive) To make or bring about; to implement.
  2. Misspelling of affect.

Usage notes

Effect is often confused with affect. The latter suggests influence over existing ideas, emotions and entities; the former indicates the manifestation of new or original ideas or entities:

  • “New governing coalitions have effected major changes” indicates that major changes were made as a result of new governing coalitions.
  • “New governing coalitions have affected major changes” indicates that before new governing coalitions, major changes were in place, and that the new governing coalitions had some influence over those existing changes.

Related terms

Translations

Further reading

  • effect in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • effect in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch effect, from Latin effectus. The sense ‘(equitable) security’ borrowed from German Effekt or French effet.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛˈfɛkt/
  • Hyphenation: ef‧fect
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt

Noun

effect n (plural effecten, diminutive effectje n)

  1. effect, impact
  2. (finance, usually in the plural) security, notably bond or stock
    Hypernym: waardepapier
  3. (ball games) spin (rotation of a ball)
  4. (obsolete) personal effect, belonging

Compounds

  • broeikaseffect
  • domino-effect
  • effectbal
  • effectenbeurs
  • effectenmakelaar
  • sneeuwbaleffect

Derived terms

  • effectief

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: effek
  • Indonesian: efek

References


Middle French

Alternative forms

  • effaict

Etymology

From Old French effect

Noun

effect m (plural effects)

  1. effect

Descendants

  • French: effet

Old French

Etymology

From Latin effectus

Noun

effect m (oblique plural effecz or effectz, nominative singular effecz or effectz, nominative plural effect)

  1. effect
  2. (law) judgment; decree
    • punir les contrevenantz solonc l’effect des estatut
      Punish the offender according to the decree of the statute

Descendants

  • English: effect
  • French: effet


English

Etymology

From Old French impression, from Latin impressio.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪmˈpɹɛʃən/
  • Rhymes: -ɛʃən

Noun

impression (plural impressions)

  1. The indentation or depression made by the pressure of one object on or into another.
  2. The overall effect of something, e.g., on a person.
  3. A vague recalling of an event, a belief.
  4. An impersonation, an imitation of the mannerisms of another individual.
  5. An outward appearance.
  6. (advertising) An online advertising performance metric representing an instance where an ad is shown once.
    • 2010, Dusty Reagan, Twitter Application Development For Dummies, John Wiley & Sons (→ISBN), page 329:
      Publishers are paid for each ad impression their site generates.
  7. (painting) The first coat of colour, such as the priming in house-painting etc.
  8. (engraving) A print on paper from a wood block, metal plate, etc.
  9. (philosophy) The vivid perception of something as it is experienced, in contrast to ideas or thoughts drawn from memory or the imagination.

Related terms

  • impressionability
  • impressionable
  • impressional
  • impressionism
  • impressionist
  • impressive
  • under the impression

Translations

Verb

impression (third-person singular simple present impressions, present participle impressioning, simple past and past participle impressioned)

  1. To manipulate a blank key within a lock so as to mark it with impressions of the shape of the lock, which facilitates creation of a duplicate key.
    • 2007, Graham Pulford, High-Security Mechanical Locks: An Encyclopedic Reference (page 55)
      The trick in impressioning a key is to remove only a small amount of the blank, by filing or cutting, from the pin positions where impressions have been left.

Anagrams

  • permission

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin impressiō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛ̃.pʁɛ.sjɔ̃/, /ɛ̃.pʁe.sjɔ̃/

Noun

impression f (plural impressions)

  1. an impression, the overall effect of something.
  2. the indentation or depression made by the pressure of one object on another.
  3. a print, print-out

Derived terms

  • faire bonne impression
  • impressionnant
  • impressionner
  • impressionnisme
  • impressionniste

Related terms

  • empreindre
  • imprimer
  • imprimerie
  • imprimante
  • imprimable

Descendants

  • Romanian: impresiune, impresie

Further reading

  • “impression” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • méprisions

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