effort vs sweat what difference

what is difference between effort and sweat

English

Etymology

From Middle French effort, from Old French esfort, deverbal of esforcier (to force, exert), from Vulgar Latin *exfortiō, from Latin ex + fortis (strong).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɛfət/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɛfɚt/

Noun

effort (plural efforts)

  1. The work involved in performing an activity; exertion.
  2. An endeavor.
  3. A force acting on a body in the direction of its motion.
    • 1858, Macquorn Rankine, Manual of Applied Mechanics
      the two bodies between which the effort acts

Usage notes

  • Adjectives often used with “effort”: conscious, good, poor, etc.

Synonyms

  • struggle

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

effort (third-person singular simple present efforts, present participle efforting, simple past and past participle efforted)

  1. (uncommon, intransitive) To make an effort.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To strengthen, fortify or stimulate

French

Etymology

From Middle French, from Old French esfort, from esforcier; morphologically, deverbal of efforcer. Compare Spanish esfuerzo, Catalan esforç, Portuguese esforço, Italian sforzo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /e.fɔʁ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔʁ

Noun

effort m (plural efforts)

  1. effort

Derived terms

  • après l’effort, le réconfort
  • effort de guerre
  • loi du moindre effort

Related terms

  • efforcer

Descendants

  • Romanian: efort

Further reading

  • “effort” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • offert

Middle French

Etymology

Old French.

Noun

effort m (plural effors)

  1. strength; might; force
  2. (military) unit; division

References

  • effort on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330–1500) (in French)

Old French

Noun

effort m (oblique plural efforz or effortz, nominative singular efforz or effortz, nominative plural effort)

  1. Alternative form of esfort


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: swĕt, IPA(key): /swɛt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Etymology 1

From Middle English swete, swet, swate, swote, from Old English swāt, from Proto-Germanic *swait-, *swaitą, from Proto-Indo-European *swoyd- (to sweat), o-grade of *sweyd- (to sweat). Cognate with West Frisian swit, Dutch zweet, German Schweiß, Danish sved, Swedish svett, Yiddish שוויצן(shvitsn) (English shvitz), Latin sudor, French sueur, Italian sudore, Spanish sudor, Persian خوید(xwēd, moist, fresh), Sanskrit स्वेद (svéda), Lithuanian sviedri, Tocharian B syā-, and Albanian djersë.

Noun

sweat (usually uncountable, plural sweats)

  1. Fluid that exits the body through pores in the skin usually due to physical stress and/or high temperature for the purpose of regulating body temperature and removing certain compounds from the circulation.
    Synonym: perspiration
  2. The state of one who sweats; diaphoresis.
  3. (Britain, slang, military slang, especially WWI) A soldier (especially one who is old or experienced).
  4. (historical) The sweating sickness.
    • 2009, Hilary Mantel, Wolf Hall, Fourth Estate 2010, page 131:
      When the sweat comes back this summer, 1528, people say, as they did last year, that you won’t get it if you don’t think about it.
  5. Moisture issuing from any substance.
  6. A short run by a racehorse as a form of exercise.
  7. (uncountable) Hard work; toil.
Synonyms
  • sudor
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Torres Strait Creole: swet
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English sweten, from Old English swǣtan, from Proto-Germanic *swaitijaną (to sweat). Compare Dutch zweten, German schwitzen, Danish svede. Doublet of shvitz.

Verb

sweat (third-person singular simple present sweats, present participle sweating, simple past and past participle sweated or sweat)

  1. (intransitive) To emit sweat.
    Synonym: perspire
  2. (transitive) To cause to excrete moisture through skin.
    1. To cause to perspire.
  3. (intransitive, informal) To work hard.
    Synonyms: slave, slog
  4. (transitive, informal) To extract money, labour, etc. from, by exaction or oppression.
  5. (intransitive, informal) To worry.
    Synonyms: fret, worry
  6. (transitive, colloquial) To worry about (something). [from 20th c.]
    • 2010, Brooks Barnes, “Studios battle to save Narnia”, The New York Times, 5 Dec 2010:
  7. (transitive) To emit, in the manner of sweat.
    • With exercise she sweat ill humors out.
    • 1980, Stephen King, The Mist
      I was sipping a third, but I had no kind of buzz on; apparently I had sweat the beer out as rapidly as I drank it.
  8. (intransitive) To emit moisture.
  9. (intransitive, plumbing) To solder (a pipe joint) together.
  10. (transitive, slang) To stress out.
  11. (transitive, intransitive, cooking) To cook slowly at low heat, in shallow oil and without browning, to reduce moisture content.
  12. (transitive, archaic) To remove a portion of (a coin), as by shaking it with others in a bag, so that the friction wears off a small quantity of the metal.
    • 1879, Richard Cobden, On the Probable Fall in the Value of Gold (originally by Michel Chevalier)
  13. (intransitive) To suffer a penalty; to smart for one’s misdeeds.
  14. (transitive) To scrape the sweat from (a horse).
Derived terms
Translations

Related terms

  • shvitz

Anagrams

  • Weast, awest, swate, tawse, waste, wetas

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English sweatshirt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /swit/

Noun

sweat m (plural sweats)

  1. sweatshirt

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