effort vs travail what difference

what is difference between effort and travail

English

Etymology

From Middle French effort, from Old French esfort, deverbal of esforcier (to force, exert), from Vulgar Latin *exfortiō, from Latin ex + fortis (strong).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɛfət/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɛfɚt/

Noun

effort (plural efforts)

  1. The work involved in performing an activity; exertion.
  2. An endeavor.
  3. A force acting on a body in the direction of its motion.
    • 1858, Macquorn Rankine, Manual of Applied Mechanics
      the two bodies between which the effort acts

Usage notes

  • Adjectives often used with “effort”: conscious, good, poor, etc.

Synonyms

  • struggle

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

effort (third-person singular simple present efforts, present participle efforting, simple past and past participle efforted)

  1. (uncommon, intransitive) To make an effort.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To strengthen, fortify or stimulate

French

Etymology

From Middle French, from Old French esfort, from esforcier; morphologically, deverbal of efforcer. Compare Spanish esfuerzo, Catalan esforç, Portuguese esforço, Italian sforzo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /e.fɔʁ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔʁ

Noun

effort m (plural efforts)

  1. effort

Derived terms

  • après l’effort, le réconfort
  • effort de guerre
  • loi du moindre effort

Related terms

  • efforcer

Descendants

  • Romanian: efort

Further reading

  • “effort” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • offert

Middle French

Etymology

Old French.

Noun

effort m (plural effors)

  1. strength; might; force
  2. (military) unit; division

References

  • effort on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330–1500) (in French)

Old French

Noun

effort m (oblique plural efforz or effortz, nominative singular efforz or effortz, nominative plural effort)

  1. Alternative form of esfort


English

Alternative forms

  • travel, travell (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • enPR: trə-vālʹ, trăvʹāl’, IPA(key): /tɹəˈveɪl/, /ˈtɹævˌeɪl/
  • Rhymes: -eɪl

Etymology 1

From Middle English travail, from Old French travail (suffering, torment), from Vulgar Latin *tripaliō (to torture; suffer, toil) from Late Latin trepālium (an instrument of torture) from Latin tripālis (held up by three stakes) from Proto-Italic *trēs + *pākslos from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂ǵ-.

Noun

travail (plural travails or travaux)

  1. (literary) Arduous or painful exertion; excessive labor, suffering, hardship. [from 13th c.]
    • 1597, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie, Book V, §21:
      But as every thing of price, so this doth require travail.
    • 1936, Djuna Barnes, Nightwood, Faber & Faber 2007, p. 38:
      He had thought of making a destiny for himself, through laborious and untiring travail.
  2. Specifically, the labor of childbirth. [from 13th c.]
    • 1607–08, William Shakespeare (?), Pericles, Prince of Tyre, Act III, Chorus:
      The lady shrieks and, well-a-near,
      Does fall in travail with her fear.
    • 1611, King James Version, Genesis 38:27–28:
      And it came to pass in the time of her travail, that, behold, twins were in her womb. And it came to pass, when she travailed, that the one put out his hand: and the midwife took and bound upon his hand a scarlet thread, saying, This came out first,
  3. (obsolete, countable) An act of working; labor (US), labour (British). [14th-18th c.]
  4. (obsolete) The eclipse of a celestial object. [17th c.]
  5. Obsolete form of travel.
  6. Alternative form of travois (a kind of sled)
Related terms
Translations
References
  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “travail”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN.
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “travail”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Etymology 2

From Middle English travailen, from Old French travaillier, from the noun (see above).

Verb

travail (third-person singular simple present travails, present participle travailing, simple past and past participle travailed)

  1. To toil.
    • 1552, Hugh Latimer, “Fourth Sermon on the Lord’s Prayer, Preached before Lady Katherine, Duchess of Suffolk”:
      [A]ll slothful persons, which will not travail for their livings, do the will of the devil.
    • 1611, King James Version, Job 15:20:
      The wicked man travaileth with pain all his days, and the number of years is hidden to the oppressor.
  2. To go through the labor of childbirth.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, John XIV:
      A woman when she traveyleth hath sorowe, be cause her houre is come: but as sone as she is delivered off her chylde she remembreth no moare her anguysshe, for ioye that a man is borne in to the worlde.
Translations

Further reading

  • Tripalium on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

French

Etymology

From Middle French travail, from the singular form from Old French travail from Vulgar Latin *tripaliō (to torture; suffer, toil) from Late Latin trepālium (an instrument of torture) from Latin tripālis (held up by three stakes). Compare Occitan trabalh, Catalan treball, English travail, Italian travaglio, Portuguese trabalho, Spanish trabajo.

The plural from Old French travauz, from travailz with l-vocalization before a consonant. The final -auz was later spelled -aux, and the sequence -au-, which once represented a diphthong, now represents an o sound.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʁa.vaj/
  • Rhymes: -aj
  • Homophones: travaille, travaillent, travailles

Noun

travail m (plural travaux)

  1. work; labor
  2. job
  3. workplace

Synonyms

  • boulot, taf, turbin, job

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “travail” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French travail.

Noun

travail m (plural travails)

  1. suffering; pain

Descendants

  • French: travail

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (travail, supplement)

Old French

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *tripaliō (to torture; suffer, toil) from Late Latin trepālium (an instrument of torture) from Latin tripālis (held up by three stakes). Compare Occitan trabalh, Catalan treball, Italian travaglio, Portuguese trabalho, Spanish trabajo.

Noun

travail m (oblique plural travauz or travailz, nominative singular travauz or travailz, nominative plural travail)

  1. suffering, torment

Descendants

  • English: travail
  • Middle French: travail
    • French: travail
  • Norman: travas

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