effort vs try what difference

what is difference between effort and try

English

Etymology

From Middle French effort, from Old French esfort, deverbal of esforcier (to force, exert), from Vulgar Latin *exfortiō, from Latin ex + fortis (strong).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɛfət/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɛfɚt/

Noun

effort (plural efforts)

  1. The work involved in performing an activity; exertion.
  2. An endeavor.
  3. A force acting on a body in the direction of its motion.
    • 1858, Macquorn Rankine, Manual of Applied Mechanics
      the two bodies between which the effort acts

Usage notes

  • Adjectives often used with “effort”: conscious, good, poor, etc.

Synonyms

  • struggle

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

effort (third-person singular simple present efforts, present participle efforting, simple past and past participle efforted)

  1. (uncommon, intransitive) To make an effort.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To strengthen, fortify or stimulate

French

Etymology

From Middle French, from Old French esfort, from esforcier; morphologically, deverbal of efforcer. Compare Spanish esfuerzo, Catalan esforç, Portuguese esforço, Italian sforzo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /e.fɔʁ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔʁ

Noun

effort m (plural efforts)

  1. effort

Derived terms

  • après l’effort, le réconfort
  • effort de guerre
  • loi du moindre effort

Related terms

  • efforcer

Descendants

  • Romanian: efort

Further reading

  • “effort” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • offert

Middle French

Etymology

Old French.

Noun

effort m (plural effors)

  1. strength; might; force
  2. (military) unit; division

References

  • effort on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330–1500) (in French)

Old French

Noun

effort m (oblique plural efforz or effortz, nominative singular efforz or effortz, nominative plural effort)

  1. Alternative form of esfort


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: trī, IPA(key): /tɹaɪ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ

Etymology 1

From Middle English trien (to try a legal case), from Anglo-Norman trier (to try a case), Old French trier (to choose, pick out or separate from others, sift, cull), of uncertain origin. Believed to be a metathetic variation of Old French tirer (to pull out, snatch), from Gothic ???????????????????? (tiran, to tear away, remove), from Proto-Germanic *teraną (to tear, tear apart), from Proto-Indo-European *der- (to tear, tear apart), see tear. Related to Occitan triar (to pick out, choose from among others). Alternatively or by confluence, the Old French is from Gallo-Roman Vulgar Latin *triare, of unknown origin.

Replaced native Middle English cunnen (to try) (from Old English cunnian), Middle English fandien (to try, prove) (from Old English fandian), and Middle English costnien (to try, tempt, test) (from Old English costnian).

Alternative forms

  • trie (obsolete)

Verb

try (third-person singular simple present tries, present participle trying, simple past and past participle tried)

  1. To attempt; to endeavour. Followed by infinitive.
  2. (obsolete) To divide; to separate.
    1. To separate (precious metal etc.) from the ore by melting; to purify, refine.
    2. (one sort from another) To winnow; to sift; to pick out; frequently followed by out.
      • 1531, Thomas Elyot, The Boke named the Governour
    • the wylde corne, beinge in shap and greatnesse lyke to the good, if they be mengled, with great difficultie will be tried out
    1. (nautical) To extract oil from blubber or fat; to melt down blubber to obtain oil
    2. To extract wax from a honeycomb
  3. To test, to work out.
    1. To make an experiment. Usually followed by a present participle.
    2. To put to test.
      • 1922, E. F. Benson, Miss Mapp, p. 89:
        “So mousie shall only find tins on the floor now,” thought Miss Mapp. “Mousie shall try his teeth on tins.”
    3. (specifically) To test someone’s patience.
    4. (figuratively, chiefly used in the imperative) To receive an imminent attack; to take.
      • 1999, Mona the Vampire, “The X-Change Student” (season 1, episode 6a):
        Mona: Try this vampire bolt on for size!
        Cedric: Why don’t you try this alien bolt?
    5. To taste, sample, etc.
    6. To prove by experiment; to apply a test to, for the purpose of determining the quality; to examine; to prove; to test.
    7. (with indirect interrogative clause) To attempt to determine (by experiment or effort).
    8. (law) To put on trial.
      • 1900, Charles W. Chesnutt, The House Behind the Cedars, Chapter I:
        The murderer, he recalled, had been tried and sentenced to imprisonment for life, but was pardoned by a merciful governor after serving a year of his sentence.
      • 1987, Hadi Khorsandi, trans. Ehssan Javan, “It Didn’t Quite Work Out—2” in The Ayatollah and I:
        I sit in front of the mirror and try myself. I am no impartial judge, otherwise I would have had myself executed several times over by now.
  4. To experiment, to strive.
    1. To have or gain knowledge of by experience.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)
    2. To work on something.
    3. (obsolete) To do; to fare.
    4. To settle; to decide; to determine; specifically, to decide by an appeal to arms.
    5. (euphemistic, of a couple) To attempt to conceive a child.
  5. (nautical) To lie to in heavy weather under just sufficient sail to head into the wind.
  6. To strain; to subject to excessive tests.
  7. (slang, chiefly African-American Vernacular, used with another verb) To want
Usage notes
  • (to attempt): This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive. Conjugations unmarked for tense can take and instead of to, for which also see Citations:try.
  • (to make an experiment): This is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing).
  • See Appendix:English catenative verbs
  • In older forms of English, when the pronoun thou was in active use, and verbs used -est for distinct second-person singular indicative forms, the verb try had the form triest, and had triedst for its past tense.
  • Similarly, when the ending -eth was in active use for third-person singular present indicative forms, the form trieth was used.
Conjugation
Synonyms
  • (to attempt): attempt, endeavor, fand, mint, take a run at, take a stab at
  • (to taste, sample, etc): sample, taste
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Noun

try (plural tries)

  1. An attempt.
  2. An act of tasting or sampling.
  3. (rugby) A score in rugby league and rugby union, analogous to a touchdown in American football.
  4. (Britain, dialect, obsolete) A screen, or sieve, for grain.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holland to this entry?)
  5. (American football) a field goal or extra point
Synonyms
  • (an attempt): bash, go, stab, whirl
  • (an act of tasting or sampling): sampling, taste, tasting
  • (a score in rugby): touchdown (American football)
  • (the point after touchdown): extra point (American football)
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Probably from Old French trié.

Adjective

try (comparative more try, superlative most try)

  1. (obsolete) Fine, excellent.

Anagrams

  • Tyr

Cornish

Alternative forms

  • (Standard Written Form) trei
  • (Standard Written Form) tri

Etymology

From Proto-Brythonic *tri, from Proto-Celtic *trīs, from Proto-Indo-European *tréyes.

Numeral

try

  1. (Standard Cornish) three

Related terms

  • teyr

See also

  • (cardinal number): Previous: dew. Next: peswar

Portuguese

Noun

try m (plural tries)

  1. try (a score in rugby)
    Synonym: ensaio
  2. (programming) try (block of code that may trigger exceptions)

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • (North Wales) IPA(key): /trɨː/
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /triː/

Verb

try

  1. third-person singular present indicative/future of troi

Mutation


Westrobothnian

Numeral

try n

  1. neuter nominative/accusative of tri (three)

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