effuse vs pour what difference

what is difference between effuse and pour

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French effuser, from Latin effusus, past participle of effundere (to pour out).

Pronunciation

  • (adjective) IPA(key): /ɪˈfjuːs/
  • (verb) IPA(key): /ɪˈfjuːz/

Adjective

effuse (comparative more effuse, superlative most effuse)

  1. Poured out freely; profuse.
    • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, The Nativity of our Lord tidings of great Joy (sermon)
      So should our joy be very effuse.
  2. Disposed to pour out freely; prodigal.
  3. (botany) Spreading loosely, especially on one side.
  4. (zoology) Having the lips, or edges, of the aperture abruptly spreading, as in certain shells.

Verb

effuse (third-person singular simple present effuses, present participle effusing, simple past and past participle effused)

  1. (transitive) To emit; to give off.
  2. (figuratively) To gush; to be excitedly talkative and enthusiastic about something.
  3. (intransitive) To pour out like a stream or freely; to cause to exude; to shed.
  4. (intransitive) To leak out through a small hole.

Translations

Noun

effuse

  1. (obsolete) effusion; loss

Derived terms

  • effuser

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /efˈfu.ze/
  • Rhymes: -uze

Verb

effuse

  1. third-person singular past historic of effondere

Participle

effuse f

  1. feminine plural of effuso

Latin

Participle

effūse

  1. vocative masculine singular of effūsus

References

  • effuse in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • effuse in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • effuse in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: , IPA(key): /pɔː/
  • (General American) enPR: pôr, IPA(key): /pɔɹ/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) enPR: pōr, IPA(key): /po(ː)ɹ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /poə/
  • (obsolete) enPR: pour, pouər, IPA(key): /paʊɹ/, /paʊəɹ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)
  • Homophone: pore; poor (in accents with the pour–poor merger); paw (non-rhotic accents with the horse–hoarse merger)

Etymology 1

From Middle English pouren (to pour), of uncertain origin. Likely to be of Celtic origin, from Celtic base *purr- (to jerk, throw (water)), akin to Welsh bwrw (to cast, strike, rain), Scottish Gaelic purr (to push, thrust, urge, drive), Irish purraim (I push, I jerk). Compare also the rare Dutch pouren (to pour).

Displaced Middle English schenchen, Middle English schenken (to pour) (from Old English sċenċan (to pour out), whence dialectal English shink, and Old Norse skenkja, whence dialectal English skink, and akin to Dutch schenken (to pour; to gift)), Middle English ȝeoten, Middle English yetten (to pour) (from Old English ġēotan (to pour) and akin to German gießen (to pour)), Middle English birlen (to pour, serve drink to) (from Old English byrelian (to pour, serve drink to)), Middle English hellen (to pour, pour out) (from Old Norse hella (to pour out, incline)). Largely displaced English teem, from Middle English temen (to pour out, empty) (from Old Norse tœma (to pour out, empty))

Verb

pour (third-person singular simple present pours, present participle pouring, simple past and past participle poured)

  1. (transitive) To cause (liquid, or liquid-like substance) to flow in a stream, either out of a container or into it.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To send out as in a stream or a flood; to cause (an emotion) to come out; to cause to escape.
    • [] I haue drunke neither wine nor strong drinke, but haue powred out my soule before the Lord.
    • Now will I shortly powre out my furie vpon thee, and accomplish mine anger vpon thee []
  3. (transitive) To send forth from, as in a stream; to discharge uninterruptedly.
    • 1733-1734, Alexander Pope, An Essay on Man
      Is it for thee the linnet pours his throat?
  4. (intransitive) To flow, pass or issue in a stream; to fall continuously and abundantly.
  5. (impersonal) To rain hard.
  6. (intransitive) Of a beverage, to be on tap or otherwise available for serving to customers.
  7. (intransitive) To move in a throng, as a crowd.
    • 1716, John Gay, Trivia: Or, The Art of Walking the Streets of London
      In the rude throng pour on with furious pace.
Synonyms
  • (pour a drink): shink, skink
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

pour (plural pours)

  1. The act of pouring.
  2. Something, or an amount, poured.
    • 2003, John Brian Newman, B. S. Choo, Advanced concrete technology: Volume 2
      Over this time period, the first concrete pour has not only lost workability but has started to set so that it is no longer affected by the action of a vibrator.
  3. (colloquial) A downpour, or flood of precipitation.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      But then one of Mr. Knott’s men would have had to put on his coat and hat and turn out, as likely as not in the pitch dark, and in torrents of rain in all probability, and grope his way in the dark in the pours of rain, with the pot of food in his hand, a wretched and ridiculous figure, to where the dog lay.
Translations

Etymology 2

Verb

pour

  1. Misspelling of pore.

References

Anagrams

  • puro, roup

Alemannic German

Alternative forms

  • pur, pür
  • Puur

Etymology

From Middle High German būre, gibūre, from Old High German gibūro, from būr (peasant). Cognate with German Bauer, Dutch buur, English bower.

Noun

pour m

  1. (Issime) farmer

References

  • “pour” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

French

Etymology

From Middle French pour, from Old French por, pur, from Vulgar Latin *por, from Latin prō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /puʁ/
  • Rhymes: -uʁ

Preposition

pour

  1. for (when followed by a noun or pronoun)
  2. to (when followed by a verb in the infinitive)

Derived terms

  • peser le pour et le contre
  • pour ainsi dire
  • pourboire m
  • pour ce qui est de
  • pour-cent m
  • pour-compte m
  • pour que

Further reading

  • “pour” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • prou

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French por, pur.

Preposition

pour

  1. for (indicates an intended aim or recipient)

Descendants

  • French: pour

Norman

Alternative forms

  • pouor (Jersey)

Etymology

From Old French por, from Vulgar Latin *por, from Latin prō.

Preposition

pour

  1. (Guernsey) for
  2. (Guernsey) in order to

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (peasant, farmer): pur (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Puter), paur (Vallader)
  • (pawn): pur (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Puter, Vallader)

Etymology

Of Germanic origin, cognate with German Bauer, Dutch boer.

Noun

pour m (plural pours)

  1. (Surmiran) peasant, farmer
  2. (Surmiran, chess) pawn

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