ego vs self what difference

what is difference between ego and self

English

Etymology

From Latin ego (I). Chosen by Freud’s translator as a translation of his use of German Ich as a noun for this concept from the pronoun ich (I). Doublet of I and Ich.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈiːɡəʊ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈiɡoʊ/
  • Rhymes: -iːɡəʊ

Noun

ego (countable and uncountable, plural egos)

  1. The self, especially with a sense of self-importance.
    • 1998, Eckhart Tolle, A New Earth
      When every thought absorbs your attention completely, when you are so identified with the voice in your head and the emotions that accompany it that you lose yourself in every thought and every emotion, then you are totally identified with form and therefore in the grip of ego. Ego is a conglomeration of recurring thought forms and conditioned mental-emotional patterns that are invested with a sense of I, a sense of self.
  2. (psychology, Freudian) The most central part of the mind, which mediates with one’s surroundings.
    • 1954, Calvin S. Hall, “A Primer of Freudian Psychology”
      In the well adjusted person the ego is the executive of the personality and is governed by the reality principle.
    • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, p. 19:
      ‘Everything begins with “I”, you mean. Which is ego,’ said Tom, placing an ankle behind his ear, ‘not id.’

Synonyms

  • I, Ich

Coordinate terms

  • (Freudian self): id, superego

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • EOG, GEO, GOE, Geo., Goe, geo, geo-, goe

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin ego. Doublet of jo.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈe.ɡo/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /ˈe.ɡu/

Noun

ego m (plural egos)

  1. ego (the self)
    Synonym: jo

Related terms

  • egoisme
  • egoista

Further reading

  • “ego” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Czech

Etymology

From Latin ego (I).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛɡo/

Noun

ego n

  1. ego
  2. (psychoanalysis) ego

Declension

Synonyms

See also

  • superego
  • id

Dutch

Etymology

Learned borrowing from Latin egō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈeː.ɣoː/
  • Hyphenation: ego

Noun

ego n (plural ego’s, diminutive egootje n)

  1. ego, self

Derived terms

  • egodocument

Related terms

  • egoïsme, egoïst, egoïstisch

Anagrams

  • oge

Finnish

Etymology

From Latin egō (I).

Noun

ego

  1. ego
  2. (psychoanalysis) ego

Declension

Anagrams

  • geo-

Ido

Etymology

Borrowed from English egoFrench égoGerman EgoItalian egoRussian э́го (égo)Spanish ego. Decision no. 693, Progreso IV.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈe.ɡo/

Noun

ego (invariable)

  1. ego

Derived terms


Indonesian

Etymology

From Latin ego (I), from Proto-Italic *egō, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Doublet of eke.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈeɡo]
  • Hyphenation: égo

Noun

ego (first-person possessive egoku, second-person possessive egomu, third-person possessive egonya)

  1. (psychology) ego.

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “ego” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Italian

Etymology

From Latin ego.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛ.ɡo/
  • Rhymes: -ɛɡo

Noun

ego m (invariable)

  1. ego

Further reading

  • ego in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Anagrams

  • geo-, goe

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *egō, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈe.ɡoː/, [ˈɛɡoː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈe.ɡo/, [ˈɛːɡɔ]

(with iambic shortening)

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈe.ɡo/, [ˈɛɡɔ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈe.ɡo/, [ˈɛːɡɔ]

Pronoun

ego or egō (first person, nominative, plural nōs)

  1. I; first person singular personal pronoun, nominative case
    • 4th century, St Jerome, Vulgate, Tobit 3:19
      et aut ego indigna fui illis aut illi mihi forsitan digni non fuerunt quia forsitan viro alio conservasti me

      And either I was unworthy of them, or they perhaps were not worthy of me: because perhaps thou hast kept me for another man

Declension

1st and 2nd person personal pronouns declension together with the possessive and reflexive pronouns.
is, ea, id (he, she, it) is not included here.

Derived terms

  • mecum
  • egomet, meimet, mihimet, memet
  • proximus egomet mihi

Descendants

See also

References

  • ego in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ego in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ego in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • ego in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.

Latvian

Noun

ego m (invariable)

  1. ego

Noun

ego m (invariable)

  1. eglantine

Synonyms

  • smaržlapu roze

Polish

Etymology

From Latin ego (I). Chosen by Freud’s translator as a translation of his use of German Ich as a noun for this concept from the pronoun ich (I).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛ.ɡɔ/

Noun

ego n (indeclinable)

  1. (psychoanalysis) ego (the most central part of the mind, which mediates with one’s surroundings)

Further reading

  • ego in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • ego in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin ego (I). Doublet of eu.

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈɛ.ɣu/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈɛ.ɡu/
  • (South Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈɛ.ɡo/

Noun

ego m (plural egos)

  1. ego (the self)
  2. (psychology) ego (most central part of the mind)

Derived terms

  • massagear o ego

Related terms


Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Latin ego.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /êːɡo/
  • Hyphenation: e‧go

Noun

ȇgo m (Cyrillic spelling е̑го)

  1. ego

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

From Latin ego (I). Doublet of yo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈeɡo/, [ˈe.ɣ̞o]

Noun

ego m (plural egos)

  1. ego
    Synonym: yo

Related terms

Further reading

  • “ego” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Turkish

Etymology

From Latin ego (I).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈe.ɡo/

Noun

ego (definite accusative egou, plural egolar)

  1. ego (the self, especially with a sense of self-importance)

Related terms

  • egosantrik


English

Alternative forms

  • (obsolete) selfe,
  • (obsolete, rare) silf, silfe

Etymology

From Middle English self, silf, sulf, from Old English self, seolf, sylf, from Proto-Germanic *selbaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛlf/
  • Rhymes: -ɛlf

Pronoun

self

  1. (obsolete) Himself, herself, itself, themselves; that specific (person mentioned).
    This argument was put forward by the defendant self.
  2. (commercial or humorous) Myself.
    I made out a cheque, payable to self, which cheered me up somewhat.

Noun

self (plural selves or selfs)

  1. One individual’s personality, character, demeanor, or disposition.
  2. The subject of one’s own experience of phenomena: perception, emotions, thoughts.
    • c. 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act II scene ix[1]:
      Portia:
      To these injunctions every one doth swear
      That comes to hazard for my worthless self.
    • Thanks to that penny he had just spent so recklessly [on a newspaper] he would pass a happy hour, taken, for once, out of his anxious, despondent, miserable self. It irritated him shrewdly to know that these moments of respite from carking care would not be shared with his poor wife, with careworn, troubled Ellen.
  3. An individual person as the object of the person’s own reflective consciousness (plural selves).
    • 1859, Sir William Hamilton, Lectures on Metaphysics and Logic Lecture IX
      The self, the I, is recognized in every act of intelligence as the subject to which that act belongs. It is I that perceive, I that imagine, I that remember, I that attend, I that compare, I that feel, I that will, I that am conscious.
  4. Self-interest or personal advantage.
  5. Identity or personality.
  6. (botany) A seedling produced by self-pollination (plural selfs).
  7. (botany) A flower having its colour uniform as opposed to variegated.
  8. (molecular biology, immunology) Any molecule, cell, or tissue of an organism’s own (belonging to the self), as opposed to a foreign (nonself) molecule, cell, or tissue (for example, infective, allogenic, or xenogenic).

Antonyms

  • (immunology) nonself

Synonyms

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • self-
  • person
  • I
  • ego

Verb

self (third-person singular simple present selfs, present participle selfing, simple past and past participle selfed)

  1. (botany) To fertilise by the same individual; to self-fertilise or self-pollinate.
  2. (botany) To fertilise by the same strain; to inbreed.

Antonyms

  • outcross

Adjective

self

  1. Having its own or a single nature or character throughout, as in colour, composition, etc., without addition or change; of the same kind; unmixed.
    a self bow: one made from a single piece of wood
    a self flower or plant: one which is wholly of one colour
  2. (obsolete) Same, identical.
    • c. 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act I scene i[2]:
      I owe you much, and, like a wilful youth
      That which I owe is lost; but if you please
      To shoot another arrow that self way
      Which you did shoot the first, I do not doubt,
      As I will watch the aim, or to find both,
      Or bring your latter hazard back again,
      And thankfully rest debtor for the first.
    • c. 1605, William Shakespeare, King Lear, Act I scene i[3]:
      I am made of that self mettle as my sister.
    • But were it granted, yet the heighth of these Mountains is far under the supposed place of Paradise; and on these self Hills the Air is so thin []
    • 1700, John Dryden, Palamon and Arcite
      At that self moment enters Palamon
      The gate of Venus []
  3. (obsolete) Belonging to oneself; own.
  4. (molecular biology, immunology) Of or relating to any molecule, cell, or tissue of an organism’s own (belonging to the self), as opposed to a foreign (nonself) molecule, cell, or tissue (for example, infective, allogenic, or xenogenic).

Antonyms

  • (immunologic sense) nonself

Further reading

  • self in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • self in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • Self in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)
  • “self”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • FLES, LSFE, elfs

Danish

Alternative forms

  • self.

Adverb

self

  1. (Internet slang) Abbreviation of selvfølgelig (of course).

Maltese

Etymology

From Arabic سَلَف(salaf).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛlf/

Noun

self m

  1. loan

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • silf, sulf

Etymology

From Old English self, from Proto-Germanic *selbaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛlf/, /silf/

Adjective

self

  1. (the) (very/self) same, (the) aforementioned
  2. Intensifies the pronoun or noun it follows or precedes; very
  3. (+genitive) own

Descendants

  • English: self
  • Scots: self, sel

References

  • “self, adj., n., & pron.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-03-31.

Pronoun

self

  1. themself, themselves; a reflexive pronoun
  2. that, this

Descendants

  • English: self (obsolete in most pronominal senses)
  • Scots: self, sel
  • Yola: zil

References

  • “self, adj., n., & pron.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-03-31.

Noun

self (plural selfs)

  1. (the) same thing, (the) aforementioned thing

References

  • “self, adj., n., & pron.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-03-31.

Old English

Alternative forms

  • seolf, sylf

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *selbaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /self/, [seɫf]

Pronoun

self

  1. self

Derived terms

  • selflīċ

Descendants

  • Middle English: self, silf, sulf
    • English: self
    • Scots: self

Old Saxon

Alternative forms

  • selvo

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *selbaz.

Pronoun

self

  1. self

Descendants

  • Low German: sulv

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