egregious vs rank what difference

what is difference between egregious and rank

English

Etymology

From Latin ēgregius, from e- (out of), + grex (flock), + English adjective suffix -ous, from Latin suffix -osus (full of); reflecting the positive connotations of “standing out from the flock”.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈɡɹiː.dʒəs/, /əˈɡɹiː.dʒi.əs/
  • Rhymes: -iːdʒəs

Adjective

egregious (comparative more egregious, superlative most egregious)

  1. conspicuous, exceptional, outstanding; usually in a negative sense.
    • 16thC, Christopher Marlowe, Ignoto,
      I cannot cross my arms, or sigh “Ah me,” / “Ah me forlorn!” egregious foppery! / I cannot buss thy fill, play with thy hair, / Swearing by Jove, “Thou art most debonnaire!”
    • c1605, William Shakespeare, All’s Well That Ends Well, Act 2, Scene 3,
      My lord, you give me most egregious indignity.
    • 22 March 2012, Scott Tobias, AV Club The Hunger Games[1]
      When the goal is simply to be as faithful as possible to the material—as if a movie were a marriage, and a rights contract the vow—the best result is a skillful abridgment, one that hits all the important marks without losing anything egregious.
  2. Outrageously bad; shocking.

Usage notes

The negative meaning arose in the late 16th century, probably originating in sarcasm. Before that, it meant outstanding in a good way. Webster also gives “distinguished” as an archaic meaning, and notes that contemporary usage often has an unpleasant connotation (for example, “an egregious error”). It generally precedes such epithets as ass, blunderer, rascal, and rogue. The Italian as well as Spanish cognate egregio has retained a strictly positive sense, as has the Portuguese cognate egrégio.

Related terms

  • egregia cum laude

Derived terms

  • egregiously
  • egregiousness

Translations



Translingual

Symbol

rank

  1. (mathematics) The symbol for rank.

English

Alternative forms

  • ranck (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɹæŋk/
  • Rhymes: -æŋk

Etymology 1

From Middle English rank (strong, proud), from Old English ranc (proud, haughty, arrogant, insolent, forward, overbearing, showy, ostentatious, splendid, bold, valiant, noble, brave, strong, full-grown, mature), from Proto-West Germanic *rank, from Proto-Germanic *rankaz (straight), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃reǵ- (straight, direct). Cognate with Dutch rank (slender, slim), Low German rank (slender, projecting, lank), Danish rank (straight, erect, slender), Swedish rank (slender, shaky, wonky), Icelandic rakkur (straight, slender, bold, valiant).

Adjective

rank (comparative ranker or more rank, superlative rankest or most rank)

  1. Strong of its kind or in character; unmitigated; virulent; thorough; utter (used of negative things).
  2. Strong in growth; growing with vigour or rapidity, hence, coarse or gross.
    • And, behold, seven ears of corn came up upon one stalk, rank and good.
  3. Suffering from overgrowth or hypertrophy; plethoric.
  4. Causing strong growth; producing luxuriantly; rich and fertile.
  5. Strong to the senses; offensive; noisome.
  6. Having a very strong and bad taste or odor.
    Synonyms: stinky, smelly, (UK) pong
    • 1661, Robert Boyle, The Sceptical Chymist
      Divers sea fowls taste rank of the fish on which they ordinarily feed.
  7. Complete, used as an intensifier (usually negative, referring to incompetence).
    Synonyms: complete, utter
  8. (informal) Gross, disgusting.
  9. (obsolete) Strong; powerful; capable of acting or being used with great effect; energetic; vigorous; headstrong.
  10. (obsolete) lustful; lascivious
Derived terms
  • outrank
  • ranken
  • rankful
Translations

Adverb

rank (comparative more rank, superlative most rank)

  1. (obsolete) Quickly, eagerly, impetuously.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.iii:
      The seely man seeing him ryde so rancke, / And ayme at him, fell flat to ground for feare […].
    • That rides so rank and bends his lance so fell.

Etymology 2

From Middle English rank (line, row), from Old French ranc, rang, reng (line, row, rank) (Modern French rang), from Frankish *hring (ring), from Proto-Germanic *hringaz (something bent or curved).

Akin to Old High German (h)ring, Old Frisian hring, Old English hring, hrincg (ring) (Modern English ring), Old Norse hringr (ring, circle, queue, sword; ship). More at ring.

Noun

rank (countable and uncountable, plural ranks)

  1. A row of people or things organized in a grid pattern, often soldiers.
    Antonym: file
    The front rank kneeled to reload while the second rank fired over their heads.
  2. (chess) One of the eight horizontal lines of squares on a chessboard (i.e., those identified by a number).
    Antonym: file
  3. (music) In a pipe organ, a set of pipes of a certain quality for which each pipe corresponds to one key or pedal.
  4. One’s position in a list sorted by a shared property such as physical location, population, or quality.
    Based on your test scores, you have a rank of 23.
    The fancy hotel was of the first rank.
  5. The level of one’s position in a class-based society.
  6. (typically in the plural) A category of people, such as those who share an occupation or belong to an organisation.
    a membership drawn from the ranks of wealthy European businessmen
  7. A hierarchical level in an organization such as the military.
    Private First Class (PFC) is the second-lowest rank in the Marines.
    He rose up through the ranks of the company, from mailroom clerk to CEO.
  8. (taxonomy) A level in a scientific taxonomy system.
    Phylum is the taxonomic rank below kingdom and above class.
  9. (mathematics) The dimensionality of an array (computing) or tensor.
  10. (linear algebra) The maximal number of linearly independent columns (or rows) of a matrix.
  11. (algebra) The maximum quantity of D-linearly independent elements of a module (over an integral domain D).
  12. (mathematics) The size of any basis of a given matroid.
Derived terms
  • break rank
  • cab off the rank
  • cab rank
  • cab-rank rule
  • close ranks
  • pull rank
  • taxi rank
Translations

Verb

rank (third-person singular simple present ranks, present participle ranking, simple past and past participle ranked)

  1. To place abreast, or in a line.
  2. To have a ranking.
    Their defense ranked third in the league.
  3. To assign a suitable place in a class or order; to classify.
    • 1725, Isaac Watts, Logick, or The Right Use of Reason in the Enquiry After Truth With a Variety of Rules to Guard
      Ranking all things under general and special heads.
    • 1726, William Broome, The Odyssey (by Homer)
      Poets were ranked in the class of philosophers.
    • 1667, Richard Allestree, The Causes of the Decay of Christian Piety
      Heresy [is] ranked with idolatry, witchcraft, hatred, murders, and other sins of the flesh.
  4. (US) To take rank of; to outrank.
Derived terms
  • misrank
  • outrank
Translations

References

  • rank at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • rank in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • ARNK, Karn, karn, knar, kran, nark

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rɑŋk/
  • Hyphenation: rank
  • Rhymes: -ɑŋk

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch ranc, from Proto-Germanic *rankaz.

Adjective

rank (comparative ranker, superlative rankst)

  1. slender, svelte

Derived terms

  • rankgebouwd
Inflection

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch ranc, ranke, from Old Dutch *rank, from Frankish hranca.

Noun

rank f (plural ranken, diminutive rankje n)

  1. tendril, a thin winding stem
  2. name of various vines
  3. an object or ornamental pattern resembling a stem

Derived terms

  • bosrank
  • hechtrank
  • ranken (verb)
  • rankerig
  • wijnrank

Anagrams

  • karn

References


German

Etymology

From Middle Low German rank, ranc, from Proto-Germanic *rankaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁaŋk/

Adjective

rank (comparative ranker, superlative am ranksten)

  1. (poetic, dated, except in the phrase rank und schlank) lithe, lissome

Declension

Related terms

  • rahn

Verb

rank

  1. singular imperative of ranken

Further reading

  • “rank” in Duden online

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