elate vs uplift what difference

what is difference between elate and uplift

English

Etymology

From Middle English elat, elate, from Latin ēlātus (exalted, lofty), perfect passive participle of efferō (bring forth or out; raise; exalt), from ē (out of) (short form of ex) + ferō (carry, bear).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈleɪt/
  • Rhymes: -eɪt

Verb

elate (third-person singular simple present elates, present participle elating, simple past and past participle elated)

  1. (transitive) To make joyful or proud.
  2. (transitive) To lift up; raise; elevate.

Translations

Adjective

elate

  1. elated; exultant
    • 1895, Helen Hunt Jackson, The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine, Volume 28
      Our nineteenth century is wonderfully set up in its own esteem, wonderfully elate at its progress.
  2. (obsolete) Lifted up; raised; elevated.
    • c. 1707, Elijah Fenton, a letter to the Knight of the Sable Shield
      with upper lip elate
    • a. 1794, William Jones, an ode in imitation of Alcaeus
      And sovereign law, that State’s collected will, / O’er thrones and globes, elate, / Sits empress, crowning good, repressing ill.

Quotations

  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:elate.

Related terms

  • elated
  • elation
  • efferent

Anagrams

  • Atlee, Teela, alete, telae

Estonian

Verb

elate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of elama

Latin

Etymology 1

From ēlātus (exalted, lofty), perfect passive participle of efferō (bring forth or out; raise; exalt), from ē (out of), short form of ex, + ferō (carry, bear).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /eːˈlaː.teː/, [eːˈɫ̪äːt̪eː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /eˈla.te/, [ɛˈlɑːt̪ɛ]

Adverb

ēlātē (comparative ēlātus or ēlātius, no superlative)

  1. loftily, proudly
    • c. 177, Gellius: Noctes Atticae, Book 9, Chapter 15, Verse 4
      Introit adulescens et praefatur arrogantius et elatius, quam aetati eius decebat, ac deinde iubet exponi controversias.

      The young fellow entered the room, made some preliminary remarks in a more arrogant and presumptuous style than became his years, and then asked that subjects for debate be given him.
Related terms
  • ēlātiō
  • ēlātus

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Ancient Greek ἐλάτη (elátē).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈe.la.teː/, [ˈɛɫ̪ät̪eː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈe.la.te/, [ˈɛːlɑt̪ɛ]

Noun

elatē f (genitive elatēs); first declension

  1. A sort of fir
  2. The leaf of the palm bud
Declension

First-declension noun (Greek-type).

References

  • elate in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • elate in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • elate in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Middle English

Adjective

elate

  1. Alternative form of elat


English

Etymology

up- +‎ lift

Pronunciation

  • (verb) enPR: ŭplĭftʹ, IPA(key): /ʌpˈlɪft/
  • (adjective, noun) enPR: ŭpʹlĭft, IPA(key): /ˈʌplɪft/

Verb

uplift (third-person singular simple present uplifts, present participle uplifting, simple past and past participle uplifted)

  1. To raise something or someone to a higher physical, social, moral, intellectual, spiritual or emotional level.
  2. (law, of a penalty) To aggravate; to increase.
  3. (aviation, travel) To be accepted for carriage on a flight.
  4. (New Zealand) To remove (a child) from a damaging home environment by a social welfare organization.

Translations

Noun

uplift (plural uplifts)

  1. The act or result of being uplifted.
  2. (geology) A tectonic upheaval, especially one that takes place in the process of mountain building.
    • 1971, George Finiel Adams, Jerome Wyckoff, Landforms (page 143)
      Recent uplift of the Maine and Oregon coasts has not been enough to “undrown” the larger valleys; the shorelines are still submergent.
  3. (transport) The picking up and loading of goods to be transported by a mover.
  4. (colloquial) A brassiere that raises the breasts.

See also

  • improvement

Translations

Anagrams

  • lift up, liftup, pitful

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