eldritch vs weird what difference

what is difference between eldritch and weird

English

Alternative forms

  • eldrich, elrich, elritch

Etymology

From the earlier form elritch, of uncertain origin. The second element, -ritch, is generally taken to be Old English rīċe (realm, kingdom) (see riche). Some think the first element, el-, derives from an Old English root meaning “foreign, strange, other” (related to Old English ellende and modern English else); others think it derives from elf. Reintroduced into popular literature by the writings of H. P. Lovecraft.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛldɹɪtʃ/

Adjective

eldritch (comparative more eldritch, superlative most eldritch)

  1. Unearthly, supernatural, eerie.

References



English

Alternative forms

  • weïrd, wierd (obsolete)
  • weyard, weyward (obsolete, Shakespeare)

Etymology

From Middle English werde, wierde, wirde, wyrede, wurde, from Old English wyrd (fate), from Proto-West Germanic *wurdi, from Proto-Germanic *wurdiz, from Proto-Indo-European *wert- (to turn, wind). Cognate with Icelandic urður (fate). Related to Old English weorþan (to become). Doublet of wyrd. More at worth.

Weird was extinct by the 16th century in English. It survived in Scots, whence Shakespeare borrowed it in naming the Weird Sisters, reintroducing it to English. The senses “abnormal”, “strange” etc. arose via reinterpretation of Weird Sisters and date from after this reintroduction.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈwɪəd/, /ˈwiːəd/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈwiɚd/, /ˈwɪɚd/
  • Rhymes: -ɪə(r)d

Adjective

weird (comparative weirder, superlative weirdest)

  1. Having an unusually strange character or behaviour.
  2. Deviating from the normal; bizarre.
  3. (archaic) Of or pertaining to the Fates.
    (Can we find and add a quotation to this entry?)
  4. (archaic) Connected with fate or destiny; able to influence fate.
  5. (archaic) Of or pertaining to witches or witchcraft; supernatural; unearthly; suggestive of witches, witchcraft, or unearthliness; wild; uncanny.
    • Those sweet, low tones, that seemed like a weird incantation.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      It may be in that dark hour at the burn-foot, before the spate caught her, she had been given grace to resist her adversary and fling herself upon God’s mercy. And it would seem that it had been granted; for when he came to the Skerburnfoot, there in the corner sat the weird wife Alison, dead as a stone.
    • 1912, Victor Whitechurch, Thrilling Stories of the Railway
      Naphtha lamps shed a weird light over a busy scene, for the work was being continued night and day. A score or so of sturdy navvies were shovelling and picking along the track.
  6. (archaic) Having supernatural or preternatural power.

Synonyms

  • (having supernatural or preternatural power): eerie, spooky, uncanny
  • (unusually strange in character or behaviour): odd, oddball, peculiar, strange, whacko; see also Thesaurus:insane
  • (deviating from the normal): bizarre, fremd, odd, out of the ordinary, strange; see also Thesaurus:strange
  • (of or pertaining to the Fates): fateful

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

weird (plural weirds)

  1. (archaic) Fate; destiny; luck.
  2. A prediction.
  3. (obsolete, Scotland) A spell or charm.
    • 1813, Walter Scott, The Bridal of Triermain
      Thou shalt bear thy penance lone
      In the Valley of Saint John,
      And this weird shall overtake thee
  4. That which comes to pass; a fact.
  5. (archaic, in the plural) The Fates (personified).

Synonyms

  • (fate; destiny): kismet, lot, orlay, wyrd
  • (luck): fortune, luck; see also Thesaurus:luck
  • (prediction): foretale, foretelling, prognostication; see also Thesaurus:prediction
  • (spell or charm): enchantment, incantation, cantrip
  • (fact):
  • (The Fates): The Norns

Derived terms

  • dree one’s weird
  • weirdless

Verb

weird (third-person singular simple present weirds, present participle weirding, simple past and past participle weirded)

  1. (transitive) To destine; doom; change by witchcraft or sorcery.
  2. (transitive) To warn solemnly; adjure.

Adverb

weird (not comparable)

  1. (nonstandard) In a strange manner. [from 1970s]

Usage notes

As an adverb, weird is only used to modify verbs, and is always positioned after the verb it modifies. Unlike weirdly it cannot modify an adjective (as in “She was weirdly generous.”) or an entire sentence (as in “Weirdly, no-one spoke up.”).

Synonyms

  • funny (adverb), strangely, weirdly

Anagrams

  • Dwire, wider, wierd, wired, wride, wried

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English weird.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wiɚd/

Adjective

weird (plural weirds)

  1. (Quebec, Louisiana, informal) weird, bizarre.

Scots

Alternative forms

  • wierd

Etymology

From Old English wyrd (fate, destiny), from Proto-Germanic *wurdiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wird/, [wiːrd]

Noun

weird (plural weirds)

  1. fate, fortune, destiny, one’s own particular fate or appointed lot
  2. event destined to happen, a god’s decree, omen, prophecy, prediction
  3. wizard, warlock, one having deep or supernatural skill or knowledge

Derived terms

Adjective

weird (comparative mair weird, superlative maist weird)

  1. troublesome, mischievous, harmful

Verb

weird (third-person singular present weirds, present participle weirdin, past weirdit, past participle weirdit)

  1. to ordain by fate, destine, assign a specific fate or fortune to, allot
  2. to imprecate, invoke
  3. to prophesy, prognosticate the fate of, warn ominously

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