electrify vs wire what difference

what is difference between electrify and wire

English

Etymology

From electric +‎ -ify

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈlɛktɹɪfaɪ/

Verb

electrify (third-person singular simple present electrifies, present participle electrifying, simple past and past participle electrified)

  1. (transitive) To supply electricity to; to charge with electricity.
  2. (transitive) To cause electricity to pass through; to affect by electricity; to give an electric shock to.
  3. (transitive) To adapt (a home, farm, village, city, industry, railroad) for electric power.
  4. (transitive) To strongly excite, especially by something delightful or inspiring; to thrill.
    Her performance in the play electrified the audience.
    • 1848, Thomas Babington Macaulay, The History of England from the Accession of James II Chapter I
      If the sovereign were now to immure a subject in defiance of the writ of habeas corpus [] the whole nation would be instantly electrified by the news.
  5. (intransitive) To become electric.

Derived terms

  • electrification

Related terms

  • electric
  • electricity

Translations

Further reading

  • electrify in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • electrify in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • electrify at OneLook Dictionary Search


English

Etymology

From Middle English wir, wyr, from Old English wīr (wire, metal thread, wire-ornament), from Proto-Germanic *wīraz (wire), from Proto-Indo-European *weh₁iros (a twist, thread, cord, wire), from *weh₁y- (to turn, twist, weave, plait).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /waɪə(ɹ)/
  • (US) enPR: wīʹər, wīr, IPA(key): /ˈwaɪɚ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪə(ɹ)

Noun

wire (countable and uncountable, plural wires)

  1. (uncountable) Metal formed into a thin, even thread, now usually by being drawn through a hole in a steel die.
  2. A piece of such material; a thread or slender rod of metal, a cable.
  3. A metal conductor that carries electricity.
  4. A fence made of usually barbed wire.
  5. (sports) A finish line of a racetrack.
  6. (informal) A telecommunication wire or cable.
  7. (by extension) An electric telegraph; a telegram.
  8. (slang) A hidden listening device on the person of an undercover operative for the purposes of obtaining incriminating spoken evidence.
  9. (informal) A deadline or critical endpoint.
  10. (billiards) A wire strung with beads and hung horizontally above or near the table which is used to keep score.
  11. (usually in the plural) Any of the system of wires used to operate the puppets in a puppet show; hence, the network of hidden influences controlling the action of a person or organization; strings.
    to pull the wires for office
  12. (archaic, thieves’ slang) A pickpocket who targets women.
  13. (slang) A covert signal sent between people cheating in a card game.
  14. (Scotland) A knitting needle.
  15. The slender shaft of the plumage of certain birds.

Synonyms

  • (thin thread of metal): cable, steel wire, thread
  • (metal conductor that carries electricity): conducting wire
  • (fencing made of usually barbed wire): barbed wire
  • (informal: telegraph): See telegraph
  • (informal: message transmitted by telegraph): See telegram
  • (object used to keep the score in billiards): score string

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Translations

Descendants

  • Gulf Arabic: واير(wāyir)

See also

  • filament
  • hawser
  • cable

Verb

wire (third-person singular simple present wires, present participle wiring, simple past and past participle wired)

  1. To fasten with wire, especially with reference to wine bottles, corks, or fencing.
    • 1934, Rex Stout, Fer-de-Lance, 1992 Bantam edition, →ISBN, page 222:
      I could see him in his plane flying low over the river or a reservoir, dropping the club out with a chunk of lead wired to the shaft.
  2. To string on a wire.
  3. To equip with wires for use with electricity.
    Do you know how to wire a plug?
  4. To add something into an electrical system by means of wiring; to incorporate or include something.
    I’ll just wire your camera to the computer screen.
  5. (figuratively, usually passive) To fix or predetermine (someone’s personality or behaviour) in a particular way.
    There’s no use trying to get Sarah to be less excitable. That’s just the way she’s wired.
  6. To send a message or monetary funds to another person through a telecommunications system, formerly predominantly by telegraph.
  7. (slang) To make someone tense or psyched up. See also adjective wired.
  8. (slang) To install eavesdropping equipment.
  9. To snare by means of a wire or wires.
  10. (transitive, croquet) To place (a ball) so that the wire of a wicket prevents a successful shot.

Synonyms

  • (equip for use with electricity): electrify
  • (informal: send a message or funds by telecommunications): cable, telegraph

Antonyms

  • (to fasten with wire): unwire

Troponyms

  • (to fasten with wire): rewire
  • (equip for use with electricity): rewire

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Weir, weir, wier

Javanese

Romanization

wire

  1. Romanization of ꦮꦶꦫꦺ

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

wire m (definite singular wiren, indefinite plural wirer, definite plural wirene)

  1. Alternative spelling of vaier

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

wire m (definite singular wiren, indefinite plural wirar, definite plural wirane)

  1. Alternative spelling of vaier

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