elephantine vs giant what difference

what is difference between elephantine and giant

English

Etymology

From Latin elephantīnus.

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ɛl.ə.ˈfæn.tin/, /ɛl.ə.ˈfæn.tɪn/, /ɛl.ə.ˈfæn.taɪn/

Adjective

elephantine (comparative more elephantine, superlative most elephantine)

  1. Of, pertaining to, or characteristic of elephants.
    • 1989, H. T. Willetts (translator), Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn (author), August 1914, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, →ISBN, page 179:
      This last summer Hanecki had captured Lenin’s imagination with his plans to found a trading company of his own in Europe, or take a partnership in some existing firm and make guaranteed monthly remittances to the Party out of his profits. This was not a Russian pipe dream: every move had been worked out with impressive precision. Kuba hadn’t thought of it himself, it was the brainchild of the elephantine genius Parvus, who had been writing to him from Constantinople. Parvus, once as poor as any other Social Democrat, had gone to Turkey to organize strikes, and now wrote frankly that he had all the money he needed (if rumor was right, he was fabulously wealthy) and that the time had come for the Party too to get rich.
  2. Very large.

Synonyms

  • (of or relating to elephants): elephantic, elephantlike
  • (very large): See also Thesaurus:gigantic

Derived terms

  • elephantine epoch
  • elephantine leprosy
  • elephantine tortoise

Translations

References


Latin

Adjective

elephantine

  1. vocative masculine singular of elephantinus


English

Alternative forms

  • giaunt (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English geaunt, geant, from Old French geant, gaiant (Modern French géant) from Vulgar Latin *gagās, gagant-, from Latin gigās, gigant-, from Ancient Greek γίγας (gígas, giant) Cognate to giga- (1,000,000,000).

Displaced native Middle English eten, ettin (from Old English ēoten), and Middle English eont (from Old English ent).

Compare Modern English ent (giant tree-man) and Old English þyrs (giant, monster, demon).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdʒaɪ.ənt/
    • (dialectal, nonstandard) IPA(key): /ˈdʒaɪnt/
  • Rhymes: -aɪənt
  • Hyphenation: gi‧ant

Noun

giant (plural giants)

  1. A mythical human of very great size.
  2. (mythology) Specifically:
    1. Any of the gigantes, the race of giants in the Greek mythology.
    2. A jotun.
  3. A very tall and large person.
  4. A tall species of a particular animal or plant.
  5. (astronomy) A star that is considerably more luminous than a main sequence star of the same temperature (e.g. red giant, blue giant).
  6. (computing) An Ethernet packet that exceeds the medium’s maximum packet size of 1,518 bytes.
  7. A very large organisation.
  8. A person of extraordinary strength or powers, bodily or intellectual.
    • 1988, Thomas Dolby, “Airhead”:
      she’s not the intellectual giant
  9. (gymnastics) A maneuver involving a full rotation around an axis while fully extended.

Synonyms

See also: Thesaurus:giant

Derived terms

  • Giant’s Causeway

Translations

Adjective

giant (not comparable)

  1. Very large.

Synonyms

  • colossal, enormous, gigantic, immense, prodigious, vast
  • See also Thesaurus:gigantic

Antonyms

  • dwarf
  • midget

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Ngāti, TA’ing, TAing, Taing, anti-g, tagin, tangi, tiang, tinga

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