elevated vs sublime what difference

what is difference between elevated and sublime

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛləveɪtɪd/
  • Hyphenation: el‧e‧vated

Verb

elevated

  1. simple past tense and past participle of elevate

Adjective

elevated (comparative more elevated, superlative most elevated)

  1. Raised, particularly above ground level.
  2. Increased, particularly above a normal level.
    the elevated language of poetry
  3. Of a higher rank or status.
  4. (computing) Running with administration rights granted
    Install all the required tools from an elevated console.
  5. (archaic, slang) intoxicated; drunk

Translations

Noun

elevated (plural elevateds)

  1. (US) An elevated railway.
    • 1934, Dashiell Hammett, The Thin Man, New York: Knopf, Chapter 16,[1]
      Mr. Nunheim’s home was on the fourth floor of a dark, damp, and smelly building made noisy by the Sixth Avenue elevated.
    • 2012, Roger P. Roess, Gene Sansone, The Wheels That Drove New York
      While the New York, Fordham, and Bronx Railway never built any elevateds, its franchise rights were valuable.


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /səˈblaɪm/
  • Rhymes: -aɪm

Etymology 1

From Middle English sublimen, borrowed from Old French sublimer, from Latin sublimō (to raise on high; to sublimate (in Medieval Latin)).

Verb

sublime (third-person singular simple present sublimes, present participle subliming, simple past and past participle sublimed)

  1. (chemistry, physics, transitive, intransitive) To sublimate.
  2. (transitive) To raise on high.
    • 1857, E. P. Whipple, Harper’s Magazine
      a soul sublimed by an idea above the region of vanity and conceit
  3. (transitive) To exalt; to heighten; to improve; to purify.
    Synonym: (archaic) sublimate
  4. (transitive) To dignify; to ennoble.
    • a. 1667, Jeremy Taylor, Clerus Domini, or, A discourse of the divine institution, necessity, sacredness, and separation of the office ministerial together with the nature and manner of its power and operation
      An ordinary gift cannot sublime a person to a supernatural employment.
Related terms
  • sublimation
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle French sublime, from Latin sublīmis (high), from sub- (up to, upwards) + a root of uncertain affiliation often identified with Latin līmis, ablative singular of līmus (oblique) or līmen (threshold, entrance, lintel)

Adjective

sublime (comparative sublimer, superlative sublimest)

  1. Noble and majestic.
    • 1842, Thomas De Quincey, Cicero (published in Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine)
      the sublime Julian leader
  2. Impressive and awe-inspiring, yet simple.
  3. (obsolete) Lifted up; high in place; exalted aloft; uplifted; lofty.
    • Sublime on these a tower of steel is reared.
  4. (obsolete) Elevated by joy; elated.
  5. Lofty of mien; haughty; proud.
Related terms
  • subliminal
Translations

Noun

sublime (plural sublimes)

  1. Something sublime.
Translations

Anagrams

  • blueism

Danish

Adjective

sublime

  1. definite of sublim
  2. plural of sublim

French

Etymology

From Middle French sublime, borrowed from Latin sublimis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sy.blim/
  • Rhymes: -im

Adjective

sublime (plural sublimes)

  1. sublime, extraordinary

Derived terms

  • Sublime Porte

Verb

sublime

  1. inflection of sublimer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading

  • “sublime” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

German

Pronunciation

Adjective

sublime

  1. inflection of sublim:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin sublimis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /suˈbli.me/

Adjective

sublime (plural sublimi)

  1. sublime

Related terms

  • sublimità

Latin

Adjective

sublīme

  1. vocative masculine singular of sublīmus

References

  • sublime in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sublime in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sublime in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.

Middle French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin sublīmus.

Adjective

sublime m or f (plural sublimes)

  1. sublime (noble, majestic, magnificent, etc.)

Descendants

  • French: sublime

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /su.ˈbli.mɪ/
  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /su.ˈbli.mɨ/
  • Hyphenation: su‧bli‧me

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin sublīmis.

Adjective

sublime m or f (plural sublimes, comparable)

  1. sublime

Noun

sublime m, f (plural sublimes)

  1. sublime

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

sublime

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of sublimar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of sublimar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of sublimar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of sublimar

Related terms


Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /suˈblime/, [suˈβ̞li.me]

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin sublimis.

Adjective

sublime (plural sublimes)

  1. sublime

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

sublime

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of sublimar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of sublimar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of sublimar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of sublimar.

Further reading

  • “sublime” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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