elevation vs superlative what difference

what is difference between elevation and superlative

English

Etymology

From Old French elevation, from Latin elevatio, equal to elevate +‎ -ion.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌɛlɪˈveɪʃən/
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

Noun

elevation (countable and uncountable, plural elevations)

  1. The act of raising from a lower place, condition, or quality to a higher; said of material things, persons, the mind, the voice, etc.
    the elevation of grain; elevation to a throne; elevation to sainthood; elevation of mind, thoughts, or character
  2. The condition of being or feeling elevated; heightened; exaltation.
  3. That which is raised up or elevated; an elevated place or station.
    A hill is an elevation of the ground.
  4. (astronomy) The distance of a celestial object above the horizon, or the arc of a vertical circle intercepted between it and the horizon; altitude.
    the elevation of the pole, or of a star
  5. The measured vertical distance from the peak of a mountain or hill to its bordering lowlands.
  6. The angle which the gnomon makes with the substylar line.
  7. The movement of the axis of a piece in a vertical plane; also, the angle of elevation, that is, the angle between the axis of the piece and the line of sight; distinguished from direction.
  8. (architecture) A geometrical projection of a building, or other object, on a plane perpendicular to the horizon; orthographic projection on a vertical plane; called by the ancients the orthography.
  9. (Christianity) The raising of the host—representing Christ’s body—in a mass or Holy Communion service.

Antonyms

  • disgust
  • demotion
  • depression
  • diminishment
  • reduction

Related terms

  • elevate
  • elevator
  • overelevation

Translations

See also

  • fasl
  • masl


English

Etymology

From Middle English superlatyf, from Old French superlatif, from Late Latin superlātīvus, from Latin superlātus (extravagant, of hyperbole), past participle of superfero (carry over), from super (above) + fero (bear, carry).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /suːˈpɜː.lə.tɪv/, /sjuːˈpɜː.lə.tɪv/
  • (US) IPA(key): /suˈpɝː.lə.tɪv/

Noun

superlative (plural superlatives)

  1. The extreme (e.g. highest, lowest, deepest, farthest, deepest, etc) extent or degree of something.
    Synonyms: acme, apex, height, zenith
  2. (grammar) The form of an adjective that expresses which of several items has the highest degree of the quality expressed by the adjective; in English, formed by appending “-est” to the end of the adjective (for some short adjectives only) or putting “most” before it.
  3. (informal) An adjective used to praise something exceptional.
    • 2019, Daniel Taylor, Lionel Messi magic puts Barcelona in command of semi-final with Liverpool (in The Guardian, 1 May 2019)[1]
      Sometimes it feels like there are no more superlatives left. Seriously, what else can be said about this little guy with the No 10 shirt and magic in his feet other than to ask, perhaps, whether there is anyone who wants to persist with the argument that Pelé, or Diego Maradona, or any of the others, have ever played this sport any better?

Synonyms

  • (highest degree): acme, peak

Hyponyms

  • absolute superlative
  • relative superlative

Related terms

  • superlative degree

Translations

Adjective

superlative (not comparable)

  1. Exceptionally good; of the highest quality; superb.
  2. (grammar) Of or relating to a superlative.

Usage notes

Rather formal, reflecting its Latin etymology; more colloquial alternatives include exceptional, fabulous, above and beyond, and others.

Synonyms

  • (exceptionally good): above and beyond, exceptional, extraordinary, superb

Translations

See also

  • absolute
  • comparative
  • elative

French

Adjective

superlative

  1. feminine singular of superlatif

Italian

Adjective

superlative

  1. feminine plural of superlativo

Latin

Adjective

superlātīve

  1. vocative masculine singular of superlātīvus

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