elf vs hob what difference

what is difference between elf and hob

English

Alternative forms

  • elve (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English elf, from Old English ielf, ælf, from Proto-West Germanic *albi, from Proto-Germanic *albiz. Ultimately probably derived from Proto-Indo-European *h₂elbʰós (white). Doublet of oaf.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: ĕlf, IPA(key): /ɛlf/
  • Rhymes: -ɛlf

Noun

elf (plural elves)

  1. (Norse mythology) A luminous spirit presiding over nature and fertility and dwelling in the world of Álfheim (Elfland). Compare angel, nymph, fairy.
  2. Any from a race of mythical, supernatural beings resembling but seen as distinct from human beings. They are usually delicate-featured and skilled in magic or spellcrafting; sometimes depicted as clashing with dwarves, especially in modern fantasy literature.
  3. (fantasy) Any of the magical, typically forest-guarding races bearing some similarities to the Norse álfar (through Tolkien’s Eldar).
  4. A very diminutive person; a dwarf.
  5. (South Africa) The bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix).

Synonyms

  • (supernatural creature): See goblin (hostile); fairy (small, mischievous)

Hyponyms

  • elfe
  • elven
  • wood elf, wood-elf

Derived terms

Related terms

  • elfin, elven, elvan
  • elvish

Descendants

  • Arabic: إِلْف(ʾilf)
  • Dutch: elf
  • German: Elf, Elfe
  • Japanese: エルフ (erufu)
  • Korean: 엘프 (elpeu)

Translations

Verb

elf (third-person singular simple present elfs, present participle elfing, simple past and past participle elfed)

  1. (now rare) To twist into elflocks (of hair); to mat.
    • c. 1605, William Shakespeare, King Lear
      My face I’ll grime with filth, blanket my loins, elf all my hairs in knots, and with presented nakedness outface the winds and persecutions of the sky.

See also

  • dark elf & light elf
  • fairy
  • brownie
  • dwarf
  • hobbit
  • Eldar

References

  • Marshall Jones Company (1930). Mythology of All Races Series, Volume 2 Eddic, Great Britain: Marshall Jones Company, 1930, pp. 220-221.

Anagrams

  • EFL

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch elf, from Middle Dutch ellef, elf, from Old Dutch *ellef, from Proto-Germanic *ainalif.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛlf/

Numeral

elf

  1. eleven

Catalan

Noun

elf m (plural elfs)

  1. elf

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɛlf]

Noun

elf m

  1. elf

Declension

Derived terms

  • elfí

Further reading

  • elf in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • elf in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛl(ə)f/
  • Hyphenation: elf
  • Rhymes: -ɛlf

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch ellef, elf, from Old Dutch *ellef, from Proto-Germanic *ainalif, a compound of *ainaz and *-lif. Compare German elf, West Frisian alve, English eleven, Danish elleve.

Numeral

elf

  1. eleven

Noun

elf f (plural elven, diminutive elfje n)

  1. The number eleven, or a representation thereof.
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: elf
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: alfu, elfu
  • Jersey Dutch: ālf
  • Negerhollands: elf, elef
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: elk

Etymology 2

Borrowed from German Elf, itself borrowed from English elf, from Old English ælf, from Proto-West Germanic *albi, from Proto-Germanic *albiz. Displaced native alf, from the same Germanic source.

Noun

elf m (plural elfen or elven, diminutive elfje n, feminine elve or elfin)

  1. elf, brownie (small folkloric creature)
  2. (fantasy) elf (humanoid pointy-eared creature in fantasy)
Synonyms
  • (mythical being): alf
Derived terms
  • boself
  • elfenbank
  • elfin
  • kerstelf
  • woudelf
Descendants
  • Papiamentu: èlfye (from the diminutive)

Anagrams

  • fel
  • lef

Dutch Low Saxon

Etymology

From Low German, from Middle Low German elvene, from Old Saxon ellevan. Related to German elf.

Numeral

elf

  1. eleven (11)

German

Alternative forms

  • eilf, eilff, eylff (dated/obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle High German einlif, eilef, elf, from Old High German einlif, from Proto-Germanic *ainalif, a compound of *ainaz and *-lif. Compare Dutch elf, West Frisian alve, English eleven, Danish elleve.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʔɛlf/

Numeral

elf

  1. eleven

Coordinate terms

Derived terms

  • Elf
  • elffach
  • Elfeck
  • elfeckig
  • elfstellig
  • elfstündig

Further reading

  • “elf” in Duden online

German Low German

Alternative forms

  • eleve, ölve, ölven

Etymology

From Middle Low German elvene, from Old Saxon ellevan.

Numeral

elf

  1. eleven

Maltese

Etymology

From Arabic أَلْف(ʾalf).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛlf/

Numeral

elf m or f (dual elfejn, plural eluf or elufijiet, paucal elef)

  1. thousand

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • elfe, helfe

Etymology

From Old English elf, Anglian form of ælf, from Proto-West Germanic *albi, from Proto-Germanic *albiz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂elbʰós (white).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛlf/

Noun

elf (plural elves)

  1. elf, fairy
  2. spirit, shade

Related terms

  • elven
  • elvyssh

Descendants

  • English: elf (see there for further descendants)
  • Scots: elf
  • Yola: elf

References

  • “elf, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-12.

Pennsylvania German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛlf/

Etymology

From Rhine Franconian, from Old High German einlif. Compare German elf, Dutch elf, English eleven.

Numeral

elf

  1. eleven

Polish

Etymology

From German Elf.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛlf/

Noun

elf m anim

  1. elf (mythical or fantasy creature)

Declension

Usage notes

The plural for the Tolkien creatures is usually elfowie.

Derived terms

  • (adjective) elfi

Further reading

  • elf in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • elf in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

Etymology

From French elfe.

Noun

elf m (plural elfi)

  1. elf

Declension


Yola

Etymology

From Middle English elf, from Old English ielf, from Proto-West Germanic *albi.

Noun

elf (plural elvès)

  1. fairy

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith


English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: hŏb, IPA(key): /hɑb/
  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: hŏb, IPA(key): /hɒb/
  • Rhymes: -ɒb

Etymology 1

Related to hub, but the ultimate origin of both words is obscure.

Noun

hob (plural hobs)

  1. A kind of cutting tool, used to cut the teeth of a gear.
  2. (historical) The flat projection or iron shelf at the side of a fire grate, where things are put to be kept warm.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Smart to this entry?)
    • 1898, Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities, Book the Second, Chapter V (The Jackal):
      They went into a dingy room lined with books and littered with papers, where there was a blazing fire. A kettle steamed upon the hob, and in the midst of the wreck of papers a table shone, with plenty of wine upon it, and brandy, and rum, and sugar, and lemons.
  3. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand) The top cooking surface on a cooker; a cooktop. It typically comprises several cooking elements (often four), also known as ‘rings’.
    • 1913, Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 2
      And the first sound in the house was the bang, bang of the poker against the raker, as Morel smashed the remainder of the coal to make the kettle, which was filled and left on the hob, finally boil.
  4. A rounded peg used as a target in several games, especially in quoits.
  5. A male ferret.
  6. The hub of a wheel.
    • August 31 1776, George Washington, letter to the President of Congress
      the wheels of the carriages sinking up to the hobs rendered it impossible for our whole force to drag them.
Synonyms
  • (cooking surface): cooktop, stovetop
Translations

Verb

hob (third-person singular simple present hobs, present participle hobbing, simple past and past participle hobbed)

  1. (transitive) To create (a gear) by cutting with a hob.
  2. (intransitive) To engage in the process of cutting gears with a hob.

Etymology 2

From Middle English Hob (a diminutive of Robin, an Old French [Term?] diminutive of Robert), through its connection with Robin Goodfellow and (later) the devil. Compare hobgoblin; see robin.

Noun

hob (plural hobs)

  1. (obsolete) A fairy; a sprite; an elf; a bogey.
    • From elves, hobs, and fairies, [] Defend us, good Heaven!
  2. (obsolete) A countryman; a rustic or yokel.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Nares to this entry?)
Synonyms
  • (supernatural creature): See goblin (hostile)
Derived terms
  • play hob with, raise hob

References

  • hob in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • BHO, BOH, HBO, boh

Danish

Etymology

From Old Danish hob, from Middle Low German hōp, from Old Saxon hōp, from Proto-West Germanic *haup (heap), cognate with English heap. Late Old Norse hópr and Swedish hop are also borrowed from Low German.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hoːˀb/, [ˈhoˀb̥]

Noun

hob c (singular definite hoben, plural indefinite hobe)

  1. crowd, multitude (a large amount of people or animals)
  2. (derogatory) common people
  3. heap
  4. (computer science) heap

Inflection

Derived terms

  • galaksehob
  • hoben (crowd, heap, noun)
  • hobe (to heap, verb)
  • til hobe (together, adverb)

German

Pronunciation

Verb

hob

  1. first/third-person singular preterite of heben

Lower Sorbian

Preposition

hob (with accusative)

  1. Obsolete spelling of wob

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