eliminate vs obviate what difference

what is difference between eliminate and obviate

English

Etymology

From Latin eliminatus, past participle of eliminare (to turn out of doors, banish), from e (out) + limen (a threshold), akin to limes (a boundary); see limit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈlɪməneɪt/

Verb

eliminate (third-person singular simple present eliminates, present participle eliminating, simple past and past participle eliminated)

  1. (transitive) To completely remove, get rid of, put an end to.
  2. (transitive, slang) To kill (a person or animal).
    a ruthless mobster who eliminated his enemies
  3. (transitive, intransitive, physiology) To excrete (waste products).
  4. (transitive) To exclude (from investigation or from further competition).
    Bill was eliminated as a suspect when the police interviewed witnesses.
    John was eliminated as a contestant when it was found he had gained, rather than lost, weight.
  5. (accounting) To record amounts in a consolidation statement to remove the effects of inter-company transactions.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:destroy, abrogate, abolish
  • (excrete): See Thesaurus:urinate and Thesaurus:defecate

Related terms

  • eliminable
  • eliminant
  • elimination
  • eliminative
  • eliminator
  • eliminatory

Hyponyms

  • give the chop to
  • give the boot to
  • give the sack to
  • give the walking papers to

Translations

Further reading

  • eliminate in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • eliminate in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

References

Anagrams

  • itameline

Italian

Verb

eliminate

  1. inflection of eliminare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of eliminato

Anagrams

  • eliantemi

Latin

Verb

ēlīmināte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of ēlīminō


English

Etymology

From Latin obviāre (to block, to hinder).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɒbviˌeɪt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɑbviˌeɪt/
  • Hyphenation: ob‧vi‧ate

Verb

obviate (third-person singular simple present obviates, present participle obviating, simple past and past participle obviated)

  1. (transitive) To anticipate and prevent or bypass (something which would otherwise have been necessary or required).
  2. (transitive) To avoid (a future problem or difficult situation).
    • 1826, Richard Reece, A Practical Dissertation on the Means of Obviating & Treating the Varieties of Costiveness, page 181:
      A mild dose of a warm active aperient to obviate costiveness, or to produce two motions daily, is generally very beneficial.
    • 2004, David J. Anderson, Agile Management for Software Engineering, page 180:
      Some change requests, rather than extend the scope, obviate some of the existing scope of a project.
    • 2008, William S. Kroger, Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis: In Medicine, Dentistry, and Psychology, page 163:
      Thus, to obviate resistance, the discussion should be relevant to the patient′s problems.
    • 2019, Gary Younge, Shamima Begum has a right to British citizenship, whether you like it or not, in the Guardian.[1]
      A government that thinks it can take on the world with Brexit can’t take back a bereaved teenaged mother with fundamentalist delusions. Moreover, the risk does not obviate two crucial facts in this case. First and foremost, she is a citizen … Second, when Begum went to Syria she was a child.

Usage notes

  • Garner’s Modern American Usage (2009) notes that phrases like obviate the necessity or obviate the need are sometimes considered redundant, but “these phrases are not redundancies, for the true sense of obviate the necessity is ‘to prevent the necessity (from arising),’ hence to make unnecessary.”

Translations

Noun

obviate (plural obviates)

  1. (linguistics) Synonym of obviative

Adjective

obviate (not comparable)

  1. (linguistics) Synonym of obviative
    • 1995, Michael Darnell, “Preverbal nominals in Colville-Okanagan” in Pamela Downing and Michael P. Noonan (eds.), Word Order in Discourse, page 91:
      Colville has a rich deictic system with forms which distinguish, for example, between source and location, with each possibility characterized as proximate and obviate as well (Mattina, 1973).
    • 1999, Edgar C. Polomé, Carol F. Justus, and Winfred Philipp Lehmann, Language Change and Typological Variation: Language change and phonology, page 115:
      The renovated system involved an obviate-proximate pronominal alternation (yu- vs. mu- respectively in Tolowa; see Bommelyn 1997), with the pronouns coming most likely out of the deictic pronoun system.
    • 2009, Nikolas Coupland and Adam Jaworski, Sociolinguistics: The sociolinguistics of culture, page 410:
      This use of the obviate deictic category—that, there, those—contrasts sharply with the use of the proximate in the body of the narrative— this, here, these.

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ob.u̯iˈaː.te/, [ɔbu̯iˈäːt̪ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ob.viˈa.te/, [ɔbviˈɑːt̪ɛ]

Verb

obviāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of obviō

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