eloquent vs facile what difference

what is difference between eloquent and facile

English

Etymology

From Old French eloquent, from Latin eloquens (speaking, having the faculty of speech, eloquent), present participle of eloqui (to speak out), from e (out) + loqui (to speak).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɛl.əˌkwənt/

Adjective

eloquent (comparative more eloquent, superlative most eloquent)

  1. fluently persuasive and articulate
  2. effective in expressing meaning by speech

Usage notes

Eloquent expresses stronger praise than do articulate or well-spoken.

Synonyms

  • articulate
  • well-spoken

Derived terms

  • eloquently

Related terms

Translations

Further reading

  • eloquent in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • eloquent in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French éloquent, from Latin ēloquēns.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌeː.loːˈkʋɛnt/
  • Hyphenation: e‧lo‧quent
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Adjective

eloquent (comparative eloquenter, superlative eloquentst)

  1. eloquent

Inflection

Synonyms

  • bespraakt (uncommon)
  • welbespraakt
  • welsprekend

Related terms

  • elocutie
  • eloquentie

German

Pronunciation

Adjective

eloquent (comparative eloquenter, superlative am eloquentesten)

  1. eloquent

Declension

Synonyms

  • redegewandt

Related terms

  • Eloquenz

Further reading

  • “eloquent” in Duden online

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French eloquent, from Latin eloquens (speaking, having the faculty of speech, eloquent), present participle of eloqui (to speak out), from e (out) + loqui (to speak).

Adjective

eloquent m (feminine singular eloquente, masculine plural eloquents, feminine plural eloquentes)

  1. eloquent

Related terms

  • eloquence


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French facile, from Latin facilis (easy to do, easy, doable), from faciō (I do, make). Compare Spanish fácil (“easy”).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfa.sʌɪl/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfæ.səl/

Adjective

facile (comparative more facile, superlative most facile)

  1. Easy, now especially in a disparaging sense; contemptibly easy. [from 15th c.]
    • , vol.I, New York, 2001, p.243:
      as he that is benumbed with cold sits shaking, that might relieve himself with a little exercise or stirring, do they complain, but will not use the facile and ready means to do themselves good […].
  2. (now rare) Amiable, flexible, easy to get along with. [from 16th c.]
    His facile disposition made him many friends.
  3. Effortless, fluent (of work, abilities etc.). [from 17th c.]
    • 1932, Duff Cooper, Talleyrand, Folio Society 2010, p. 54:
      we can learn the impression that he made upon a stranger and a foreigner at this period, thanks to the facile pen of Fannu Burney.
    • 1974, Graham Greene, The Honorary Consul, Pocket Books, New York, p.54:
      “Discipline,” Jorge Julio Saavedra was repeating, “is more necessary to me than to other more facile writers.
    • 1990, Peter Hopkirk, The Great Game, Folio Society 2010, p. 372:
      A facile and persuasive writer, he also turned out countless newspaper articles on Russian aims in Central Asia and how best these could be thwarted.
  4. Lazy, simplistic (especially of explanations, discussions etc.). [from 19th c.]
    • 2012, Chris Huhne, The Guardian, 3 May 2012:
      There is a facile view that our green commitments – to tackling climate change, avoiding air and water pollution, protecting natural habitats – are an obstacle to growth. The message of the commodity markets is surely different.
  5. (chemistry) Of a reaction or other process, taking place readily.
    Decarboxylation of beta-keto acids is facile

Synonyms

  • (skillful): See also Thesaurus:skillful

Related terms

  • facilitation
  • facilitative
  • facilitate
  • facilitator
  • facilitatory
  • facility

Translations

  • Kyrgyz: жеңил (ky) (jeñil), тил алгыч (ky) (til alğıç), көнгүч (ky) (köngüç), элпек (ky) (elpek)

Further reading

  • facile in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • facile in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • facile at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • fecial

Esperanto

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faˈtsi.le/

Adverb

facile

  1. easily

Antonyms

  • malfacile (with difficulty)

Related terms

  • facila (easy)
  • facili (to be easy)

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin facilis (easy), from faciō (I do, make).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fa.sil/
  • Homophone: faciles
  • Hyphenation: fa‧cile

Adjective

facile (plural faciles)

  1. easy, simple
    Antonym: difficile (difficult)
  2. (derogatory, chiefly of women) easy, promiscuous (consenting readily to sex)

Usage notes

The preposition de is used with an impersonal subject, and à with a non-impersonal one.

Derived terms

  • avoir la gâchette facile
  • fille facile
  • plus facile à dire qu’à faire

Related terms

  • faire

Further reading

  • “facile” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • ficela

Interlingua

Adjective

facile (comparative plus facile, superlative le plus facile)

  1. easy

Antonyms

  • difficile

Italian

Etymology

Probably borrowed from Latin facilis (easy), from faciō (I do, make).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfa.t͡ʃi.le/
  • Rhymes: -atʃile

Adjective

facile (plural facili, superlative facilissimo)

  1. easy
  2. cosy
  3. effortless

Derived terms

  • facilmente

Related terms

  • facilità
  • facilitare
  • facilone
  • fare

Anagrams

  • cefali, faleci, fecali

Latin

Etymology 1

From the neuter accusative case form of facilis.

Alternative forms

  • facul (anteclass.)

Adverb

facile (comparative facilius, superlative facillimē)

  1. easily
    Synonym: faciliter

Antonyms

  1. vix
  2. aegre

Etymology 2

Adjective

facile

  1. nominative neuter singular of facilis
  2. accusative neuter singular of facilis
  3. vocative neuter singular of facilis

References

  • facile in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • facile in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.

Middle French

Etymology

1441, borrowed from Latin facilis.

Adjective

facile m or f (plural faciles)

  1. easy (not difficult)

References


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