em vs pica what difference

what is difference between em and pica

English

Etymology 1

The typographic em is named after the metal type for the capital M in early printing, whose body was square (the printed letter M is almost never one em in width).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: ĕm, IPA(key): /ɛm/
  • Rhymes: -ɛm

Noun

em (plural ems)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter M.
  2. (typography) A unit of measurement equal to the height of the type in use.
    Synonyms: quad, em quad, mutton, mut
Derived terms
  • emcee
  • em dash
  • em space
  • em quad
Translations

See also

  • (Latin-script letter names) letter; a, bee, cee, dee, e, ef, gee, aitch, i, jay, kay, el, em, en, o, pee, cue, ar, ess, tee, u, vee, double-u, ex, wye, zee / zed

Etymology 2

Determiner

em

  1. Alternative form of ’em

Etymology 3

Coined by Christine M. Elverson by removing the “th” from them, perhaps influenced by the pre-existing em/’em, now often perceived as apheretic forms of them (though originally unrelated).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛm/

Pronoun

em (third-person singular, gender-neutral, objective case, reflexive emself, possessive adjective eir, possessive pronoun eirs)

  1. (rare) A gender-neutral third-person singular object pronoun, the objective case of ey, equivalent to the singular them and coordinate with him and her.
Synonyms
  • see Appendix:English third-person singular pronouns
Derived terms
  • emself

Etymology 4

Compare um.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛ(ː)m/

Interjection

em

  1. (Scotland, Ireland) a form of hesitant speech, or an expression of uncertainty; um; umm; erm
    She was going to, em… the salon, I think.

Anagrams

  • -me-, /me, M&E, ME, Me, Me., me

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin , from Proto-Indo-European *(e)me-.

Pronoun

em (proclitic, contracted m’, enclitic me, contracted enclitic ‘m)

  1. me (direct or indirect object)

Declension

Usage notes

  • em is the reinforced (reforçada) form of the pronoun. It is used before verbs beginning with consonant.

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɛm]

Noun

em n

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter M.

Further reading

  • em in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • em in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /em/, [ɛ̃ˑ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /em/, [ɛm]

Etymology 1

Noun

em f (indeclinable)

  1. The name of the letter M.
Usage notes
  • Multiple Latin names for the letter M, m have been suggested. The most common is em or a syllabic m, although there is some evidence which also supports, as names for the letter, , əm, , and even (in the fourth- or fifth-century first Antinoë papyrus, which gives Greek transliterations of the Latin names of the Roman alphabet’s letters) ιμμε (imme).
Coordinate terms
  • (Latin-script letter names) littera; ā, bē, cē, dē, ē, ef, gē, hā / *acca, ī, kā, el, em, en, ō, pē, kū, er, es, tē, ū, ix / īx / ex, ȳ / ī graeca / ȳpsīlon, zēta

Etymology 2

Interjection

em

  1. of wonder or emphasis, there!

References

  • em in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • em in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • em in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[4], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • Arthur E. Gordon, The Letter Names of the Latin Alphabet (University of California Press, 1973; volume 9 of University of California Publications: Classical Studies), especially pages 30–31, 42–44, and 63

Latvian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɛm]

Noun

em m (invariable)

  1. The Latvian name of the Latin script letter M/m.

See also

  • Latvian letter names:
    a (A), garais ā (Ā), (B), (C), čē (Č), (D), e (E), garais ē (Ē), ef (F), (G), ģē (Ģ), (H), i (I), garais ī (Ī), (J), (K), ķē (Ķ), el (L), (Ļ), em (M), en (N), (Ņ), o (O), (P), er (R), es (S), (Š), (T), u (U), garais ū (Ū), (V), (Z), žē (Ž)

Luxembourgish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /em/, [əm]

Pronoun

em

  1. Reduced form of him

Declension


Marshallese

Pronunciation

  • (phonetic) IPA(key): [ɛmʲ]
  • (phonemic) IPA(key): /jɛmʲ/
  • Bender phonemes: {yem}

Alternative forms

  • im
  • -m

Conjunction

em

  1. and

References

  • Marshallese–English Online Dictionary

Middle English

Pronoun

em

  1. Alternative form of hem (them)

Northern Kurdish

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -em

Pronoun

em (oblique me)

  1. we; us (first-person plural personal pronoun)

Old Frisian

Alternative forms

  • ām, āme

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *auhaim (maternal uncle)

Noun

ēm m

  1. an uncle, mother’s brother

Inflection


Old Norse

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *immi (“am”; a form of the verb *wesaną (to be; dwell)), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésmi (I am, I exist). Cognate with English am, Gothic ???????? (im, am), Latin sum (am), Ancient Greek εἰμί (eimí), Albanian jam (I am), Sanskrit अस्मि (ásmi), Latvian esmu ((I) am), esam (we are).

Verb

em

  1. I am, first-person of vera (meaning “to be”)

Derived terms

  • emk

Pennsylvania German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛm/

Etymology

Compare German dem.

Article

em m (definite)

  1. the

Declension

Pronoun

em

  1. to him

Declension


Portuguese

Etymology

From Old Portuguese en, from Latin in (in), from Proto-Italic *en, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁én (in). Doublet of in.

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ɐ̃j̃/
    • Homophone: hem
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ẽj̃/, /ĩ/
    • Homophone: hein

Preposition

em

  1. in; inside; within (contained by)
  2. on; on top of (located just above the surface of)
    • 2003, J. K. Rowling, Lya Wyler, Harry Potter e a Ordem da Fênix, Rocco, page 417:
      Então o sorriso reapareceu em seu rosto […]

      Then the smile reappeared on his face […]
  3. in; at (located in a location)
  4. in (part of; a member of)
  5. in; into; inside (towards the inside of)
  6. indicates the target of an action
  7. in (pertaining to the particular thing)
  8. in (immediately after a period of time)
  9. in; during (within a period of time)
  10. at; in (in a state of)
  11. in (indicates means, medium, format, genre or instrumentality)
  12. in (indicates a language, script, tone etc. of writing, speaking etc.)
  13. in (wearing)
  14. (slang) indicates that the object deserves a given punishment

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:em.

Synonyms

  • (inside): dentro de
  • (on): sobre, em cima de
  • (part of): parte de
  • (into): para dentro de
  • (immediately after): logo depois/após
  • (during): consoante, durante
  • (wearing): de, vestido de, vestindo

Usage notes

When followed by an article, a pronoun, a demonstrative pronoun or adjective, em is combined with the next word to give the following combined forms:


Scots

Verb

em

  1. (South Scots) emphatic first-person singular simple present of ti be

See also

  • er
  • es
  • im

Swedish

Alternative forms

  • em.
  • e.m.
  • e. m.

Noun

em

  1. pm (indicating hours in the afternoon); Abbreviation of eftermiddagen.

Usage notes

  • Since the 1960s, Sweden primarily uses the 24 hour clock, making am/pm abbreviations unnecessary and less common

Antonyms

  • fm

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English him.

Pronoun

em

  1. The third person singular pronoun refers to a person or thing other than the speaker or the person being spoken to. Pronouns in Tok Pisin are not inflected for different cases.

Derived terms

  • em tasol

Related terms

  • -im

See also


Torres Strait Creole

Etymology

From English him.

Pronoun

em

  1. he/she/it (third-person singular pronoun)

Veps

Verb

em

  1. first-person plural present of ei

Vietnamese

Etymology

From Proto-Vietic *ʔɛːm, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *(sʔ)iəm; cognate with Pacoh a-em (younger sibling).

According to Phan Kế Bính’s Việt Nam phong tục (1915), apparently the practice of calling each other anhem for those in relationship originated from the province of Quảng Nam:

Pronunciation

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [ʔɛm˧˧]
  • (Huế) IPA(key): [ʔɛm˧˧]
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [ʔɛm˧˧]

Noun

(classifier đứa, thằng, con) em • (㛪, 俺, 腌)

  1. a younger sibling
  2. someone who’s presumably a little younger than you, or old enough relative to you to be your younger sibling

Derived terms

Pronoun

em • (㛪, 俺, 腌)

  1. (familiar) I/me, someone who’s presumably a little younger than you, or old enough relative to you to be your younger sibling
  2. I/me, your girlfriend or wife
  3. I/me, your student who’s younger than you
  4. (familiar) you, someone who’s presumably a little younger than me, or old enough relative to me to be my younger sibling
  5. you, my girlfriend or wife
    Antonyms: anh, tôi
  6. you, my student who’s younger than me
  7. (education) you, the grade school or middle school student reading this textbook
    Synonyms: anh, chị

Synonyms

  • (in teacher-student relationship): con

Adjective

em • (㛪, 俺, 腌)

  1. small; smaller

See also

  • anh
  • chị

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛm/

Noun

em f (plural emiau)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter M.

Mutation

See also

  • (Latin-script letter names) llythyren; a, bi, ec, èch, di, èdd, e, èf, èff, èg, eng, aetsh, i/i dot, je, ce, el, èll, em, en, o, pi, ffi, ciw, er, rhi, ès, ti, èth, u/u bedol, fi, w, ecs, y, sèd (Category: cy:Latin letter names)


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpʌɪkə/
  • (US) enPR: pīkə, IPA(key): /ˈpaɪkə/
  • Rhymes: -aɪkə

Etymology 1

From Latin pīca (magpie, jay), from the idea that magpies will eat almost anything.

Noun

pica (usually uncountable, plural picas)

  1. (pathology) A disorder characterized by craving and appetite for non-edible substances, such as ice, clay, chalk, dirt, or sand.
    Synonyms: allotriophagy, chthonophagia, cittosis, geophagy
Translations

Further reading

  • pica (disorder) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

From Medieval Latin pica (pica: a service book), possibly from Latin pīca (magpie) after the piebald appearance of the typeset page (cf. pie (disordered type)). The relation to the printer’s measure is unclear, as no edition of the text in pica type is known. The French pica derives from English rather than vice versa.

Noun

pica (countable and uncountable, plural picas)

  1. (typography, printing, uncountable) A size of type between small pica and English, now standardized as 12-point.
    • 1790, James Boswell, in Danziger & Brady (eds.), Boswell: The Great Biographer, Yale 1989, p. 30:
      I had been at Baldwin’s before dinner in consequence of a letter from him which showed me that, by using a pica instead of an English letter in printing my book, I might comprise it within such a number of sheets as a guinea-volume should contain [] .
  2. (typography, uncountable, usually with qualifier) A font of this size.
  3. (typography, countable) A unit of length equivalent to 12 points, officially 3583 cm (0.166 in) after 1886 but now (computing) 16 in.
    Coordinate terms: cicero, em, en, point
  4. (uncommon, ecclesiastical) A pie or directory: the book directing Roman Catholic observance of saints’ days and other feasts under various calendars.
Derived terms
Translations

Further reading

  • pica (typography) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 3

Noun

pica (plural picas)

  1. Archaic form of pika (small lagomorph).
    • 1895, Richard Lydekker, The Royal Natural History (volume 3, page 190)
      Most travellers in the Himalaya are familiar with the pretty little Rodents, known as picas, tailless hares, or mouse-hares, which may be seen in the higher regions []

Etymology 4

From Latin

Noun

pica (plural picas)

  1. A magpie.

References

Anagrams

  • ACPI, APIC, apic, capi, paci

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /ˈpi.kə/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈpi.ka/

Etymology 1

Latin pīla (mortar), with an unexplained change from /l/ to /k/. Compare Spanish pila (sink, font).

Noun

pica f (plural piques)

  1. bowl
  2. sink
    Synonym: lavabo

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Spanish pica (pike).

Noun

pica f (plural piques)

  1. (weaponry) pike
  2. (card games) spade

Etymology 3

Latin pīca (magpie)

Noun

pica f (uncountable)

  1. (pathology) pica (disorder characterized by craving and appetite for non-edible substances)

Etymology 4

Deverbal of picar

Noun

pica f (plural piques)

  1. peak, summit
    Synonyms: pic, cim, cima

Etymology 5

From French pika, from an Evenki word.

Noun

pica f (plural piques)

  1. pika (small, furry mammal)

Further reading

  • “pica” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “pica” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Galician

Noun

pica m (plural picas)

  1. pipit
  2. (card games) spade (a playing card of the suit spades, picas)

Verb

pica

  1. third-person singular present indicative of comer
  2. second-person singular imperative of comer

Italian

Noun

pica f (plural piche)

  1. picacismo
  2. magpie

Anagrams

  • capi, capì, paci

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European *(s)peyk- (woodpecker; magpie), whence also Latin pīcus (woodpecker). Romance forms in -e- might reflect a different etymon, such as the Umbrian peico (acc.sg.), where the product of /ei/’s monophthongisation coincided with the latin /ē/. Cognate to Sanskrit पिक (piká, cuckoo), German Specht (woodpecker), Swedish spett (crowbar, skewer; kind of woodpecker).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈpiː.ka/, [ˈpiːkä]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈpi.ka/, [ˈpiːkɑ]

Noun

pīca f (genitive pīcae); first declension

  1. magpie

Declension

First-declension noun.

Related terms

  • pīcus

Descendants

References

  • von Wartburg, Walther (1928–2002), “pīca”, in Französisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), volume 80, page 420

Further reading

  • pica in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pica in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pica in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

Latvian

Noun

pica f (4th declension)

  1. pizza

Declension


Old Polish

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *piťa.

Noun

pica f

  1. fodder, forage

Descendants

  • Polish: picować originally “to forage (demand fodder for army)”, then “to bother someone”, now “to try and dupe someone”, “to pull the wool over someone’s eyes”
    • Polish: pic back-formation from “picować”

Portuguese

Etymology 1

Back-formation from picar

Noun

pica f (plural picas)

  1. (Brazil, slang) dick; prick; penis
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:penis/translations
  2. (Portugal, childish) jab (medical injection)
    Synonym: vacina
  3. (Portugal, colloquial) energy; power
  4. (Portugal, colloquial) enthusiasm, will

pica m (plural picas)

  1. (Portugal, informal) ticket inspector
    Synonym: revisor

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English pic.

Noun

pica f (plural picas)

  1. (Brazil, Internet slang) pic (short for picture, meaning image)

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

pica

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of picar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of picar

Romanian

Etymology

From pic. Compare also Aromanian chicu, chicare.

Verb

a pica (third-person singular present pică, past participle picat1st conj.

  1. (of a liquid) to drip
    Synonym: picura
  2. (literally and figuratively) to fall
    Synonym: cădea
  3. to fail
  4. to come unexpectedly

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • picătură

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology 1

Hypocoristic form derived from pízda (cunt).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pǐːtsa/
  • Hyphenation: pi‧ca

Noun

píca f (Cyrillic spelling пи́ца)

  1. (vulgar, hypocoristic) cunt, pussy
Declension

Etymology 2

From Italian pizza.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pîtsa/
  • Hyphenation: pi‧ca

Noun

pȉca f (Cyrillic spelling пи̏ца)

  1. pizza
Declension

Slovene

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian pizza.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pìːt͡sa/, /píːt͡sa/

Noun

pīca f

  1. pizza

Inflection

Further reading

  • pica”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpika/, [ˈpi.ka]

Noun

pica f (plural picas)

  1. pike, lance
  2. pick (digging tool)
  3. (card games) spade (a playing card of the suit spades, picas)

Derived terms

  • poner una pica en Flandes
  • sacar picas

See also

Verb

pica

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of picar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of picar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of picar.

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