emancipate vs liberate what difference

what is difference between emancipate and liberate

English

Etymology

From Latin ēmancipātus, past participle of ēmancipō (to declare (a son) free and independent of the father’s power by the thrice-repeated act of mancipātiō and manumissiō, give from one’s own power or authority into that of another, give up, surrender), from ē (out) + mancipō (to transfer ownership in), from manceps (purchaser, a contractor, literally, one who takes in hand), from manus (hand) + capiō (to take). See manual, and capable.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈmænsɪpeɪt/

Verb

emancipate (third-person singular simple present emancipates, present participle emancipating, simple past and past participle emancipated)

  1. To set free from the power of another; to liberate; as:
    1. To set free, as a minor from a parent
    2. To set free from slavery or bondage; to give freedom to; to manumit
  2. To free from any controlling influence, especially from anything which exerts undue or evil influence
    • 1699, John Evelyn, Acetaria: A Discourse of Sallets
      From how many troublesome and slavish impertinences [] he had emancipated and freed himself.
    • 1879, Adolphus Ward, Chaucer, in English Men of Letters
      to emancipate the human conscience

Synonyms

  • liberate
  • manumit

Derived terms

  • emancipatory
  • emancipatrix

Related terms

  • emancipation
  • emancipator
  • emancipist

Translations

References

  • emancipate in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Adjective

emancipate (comparative more emancipate, superlative most emancipate)

  1. Freed; set at liberty.

Further reading

  • emancipate in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • emancipate in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Italian

Adjective

emancipate

  1. feminine plural of emancipato

Verb

emancipate

  1. inflection of emancipare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of emancipato

Latin

Verb

ēmancipāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of ēmancipō


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin līberātus, past participle of līberō (to set free, deliver), from līber (free); see liberal.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɪbəɹeɪt/
  • Hyphenation: lib‧er‧ate

Verb

liberate (third-person singular simple present liberates, present participle liberating, simple past and past participle liberated)

  1. (transitive) To set free, to make or allow to be free, particularly
    1. To release from slavery: to manumit.
    2. To release from servitude or unjust rule.
    3. To release from restraint or inhibition.
      • 1991 May 12, “Kidnapped!” Jeeves and Wooster, Series 2, Episode 5:
        Jeeves: Foreign travel often liberates emotions best kept in check, sir. The air of North America is notoriously stimulating in this regard, as witness the regrettable behavior of its inhabitants in 1776.
        B. Wooster: Hm? What happened in 1776, Jeeves?
        Jeeves: I prefer not to dwell on it, if it’s convenient to you, sir.
    4. (chemistry) To release from chemical bonds or solutions.
  2. (transitive, military, euphemistic) To acquire from an enemy during wartime, used especially of cities, regions, and other population centers.
  3. (transitive, euphemistic) To acquire from another by theft or force: to steal, to rob.

Synonyms

  • befree, free, set free

Related terms

  • liberation
  • liberator

Translations

Further reading

  • liberate in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • liberate in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • beertail, iterable, tierable

Italian

Verb

liberate

  1. inflection of liberare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

Anagrams

  • albereti, bilatere

Latin

Verb

līberāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of līberō

Participle

līberāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of līberātus

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