embodiment vs incarnation what difference

what is difference between embodiment and incarnation

English

Etymology

embody +‎ -ment

Noun

embodiment (countable and uncountable, plural embodiments)

  1. The process of embodying.
  2. (countable) A physical entity typifying an abstract concept.
    You are the very embodiment of beauty.
    • 1880, W. S. Gilbert, Iolanthe
      The law is the true embodiment Of everything that’s excellent. It has no kind of fault or flaw, And I, my Lords, embody the law.
    • 2017 September 27, David Browne, “Hugh Hefner, ‘Playboy’ Founder, Dead at 91,” Rolling Stone
      And with his trademark smoking jackets and pipes – and the silk pajamas he would often wear to work – Hefner became the embodiment of a sexually adventurous yet urbane image and lifestyle, a seeming role model for generations of men.

Synonyms

  • incarnation

Derived terms

  • disembodiment
  • reembodiment

Translations



English

Etymology

From Middle English incarnacion, borrowed from Old French incarnacion, from Medieval Latin, Ecclesiastical Latin incarnatio, from Late Latin incarnari (to be made flesh).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌɪŋkɑː(ɹ)ˈneɪʃən/
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

Noun

incarnation (countable and uncountable, plural incarnations)

  1. An incarnate being or form.
    • 1815, Francis Jeffrey, Wordsworth’s White Doe (review)
      She is a new incarnation of some of the illustrious dead.
    • 1922, Baroness Orczy, The Triumph of the Scarlet Pimpernel
      Robespierre, the very incarnation of lustful and deadly Vengeance, stands silently by..
  2. A living being embodying a deity or spirit.
  3. An assumption of human form or nature.
  4. A person or thing regarded as embodying or exhibiting some quality, idea, or the like.
  5. The act of incarnating.
  6. The state of being incarnated.
  7. (obsolete) A rosy or red colour; flesh colour; carnation.
  8. (medicine, obsolete) The process of healing wounds and filling the part with new flesh; granulation.

Related terms

  • carnal
  • incarnate
  • reincarnate
  • reincarnation

Translations

Further reading

  • incarnation in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • incarnation in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Etymology

From Middle French incarnation, from Old French incarnacion, borrowed from Ecclesiastical Latin incarnātiō, incarnātiōnem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛ̃.kaʁ.na.sjɔ̃/

Noun

incarnation f (plural incarnations)

  1. embodiment (entity typifying an abstraction)

Related terms

  • incarner

Further reading

  • “incarnation” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French incarnacion, borrowed from Ecclesiastical Latin incarnātiō, incarnātiōnem.

Noun

incarnation f (plural incarnations)

  1. (Christianity) Incarnation. Specifically, the incarnation of God in the form of Jesus Christ.

Descendants

  • French: incarnation

References

  • incarnation on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330–1500) (in French)

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