embonpoint vs roundness what difference

what is difference between embonpoint and roundness

English

Etymology

Borrowed from French embonpoint.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: äɴbôɴpwĕɴ, IPA(key): /ɑ̃bɔ̃pwɛ̃/

Noun

embonpoint (countable and uncountable, plural embonpoints)

  1. Plumpness, stoutness, especially when voluptuous.
    • 1911, J.M. Barrie, Peter and Wendy:
      She was slightly inclined to embonpoint.
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses:
      The beautiful woman threw off her sabletrimmed wrap, displaying her queenly shoulders and heaving embonpoint.
    • 2002, Colin Jones, The Great Nation, Penguin 2003, p. 1:
      The patient’s physicians had always allowed him to indulge a gargantuan appetite, countering his intake and regulating his embonpoint by a heroic diet of purges and enemas.

Translations

Adjective

embonpoint (comparative more embonpoint, superlative most embonpoint)

  1. Plump, chubby, buxom.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:overweight, Thesaurus:voluptuous

Translations


French

Etymology

Univerbation of en bon point.

The rule in French is to write /n/ as /m/ in front of /m, p/ or /b/ – here the rule is applied to the first /n/ but not the second since the rule does not apply to the words derived from bon : bonbon, bonbonne and bonbonnière.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑ̃.bɔ̃.pwɛ̃/

Noun

embonpoint m (plural embonpoints)

  1. plumpness, stoutness
    Synonyms: obésité, surpoids

Further reading

  • “embonpoint” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Etymology

From Middle English roundnesse, equivalent to round +‎ -ness.

Noun

roundness (usually uncountable, plural roundnesses)

  1. The quality of being round; rotundity.

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial